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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Myelin Patch for Multiple Sclerosis



Published Sept 10, 2014

Dr. Kantor talks with Professor Krzysztof Selmaj, Professor of Neurology at Lodz University, Poland about a study of Myelin in a patch for Multiple Sclerosis.




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“Everything You Wanted to Know about MS, BUT FORGOT to Ask” - Webinar


MS Views and News

Presenting a LIVE Q&A Webinar
Date: November 22, 2014
Program Time: 11:25am



“Everything You Wanted to Know about MS,
  BUT FORGOT to Ask”  

                    


Register now for our upcoming MS 
-Q&A Webinar on 11.22.14 - 

 “Everything You Wanted to Know about MS,  BUT FORGOT to Ask” - 



This program is for Anybody, anywhere in the world, with internet access. You can watch and ask Multiple Sclerosis related questions (in English or Spanish) during this event as we will be Live-Streaming this program 


 To Register in advance, click: http://goo.gl/Iex51v




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Pros and Cons of Functional Electrical Stimulation for MS-Related Foot Drop

Nerve damage often leads to MS foot drop, causing people to drag their foot behind them. Functional electrical stimulation devices aim to end that.


© 2014 Bioness Inc.

FES devices aren't for everyone with MS-related foot drop, but knowing the benefits and risks can help make an informed decision.




Foot drop is one of the scourges of multiple sclerosis. You can have so much weakness in the front of your foot that it’s hard to walk without dragging your toes, making you more prone to falling. Enter functional electrical stimulation (FES) devices.

They can help people with MS-related foot drop walk normally again or at least with a much-improved gait. Though FES devices aren’t for everyone, they’re something to consider.

Functional Electrical Stimulation and MS Foot Drop
Foot drop usually results from damage to the peroneal nerve, the nerve that helps control the muscles on the front and sides of the legs and the top of the foot, and affects how well you can lift your foot at the ankle. People with foot drop often overcompensate and lift their leg higher when walking, which becomes exhausting and can lead to pain.

Most of my patients have foot drop, whether mild or more severe, says Nesanet Mitiku, MD, PhD, an assistant professor at the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for MS at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. It's a very prevalent MS occurrence.

An FES device has electrodes that directly stimulate the leg in order to correct foot drop. It’s strapped around the leg just below the knee and sends low levels of electrical stimulation to the peroneal nerve, telling it to lift the foot as you walk. Current devices are the WalkAide, Bioness L300, and Odstock Dropped Foot Stimulator Pace.

The Latest FES Research
There’s limited research on how well FES devices work for people with MS. Most studies have been done on people who've had a stroke, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. However, two small studies on FES devices and MS found very positive results.


In one, researchers looked at 40 people with MS who were on a rehabilitation program that included cycling with an FES. They noted improved motor skills and stability after the therapy in 75 percent of those with primary progressive MS, 71 percent of those with secondary progressive MS, and 55 percent of those with relapsing-remitting MS.

CONTINUE READING



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HOW TO RECOGNIZE MS RELAPSE SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

HOW TO RECOGNIZE MS RELAPSE SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

Because each multiple sclerosis relapse can be different, symptoms can vary too. Common symptoms that can appear and worsen include:
  • Bladder problems
  • Bowel problems
  • Coordination problems (tripping, dropping things)
  • Difficulty walking
  • Dizziness/poor balance
  • Fatigue
  • Hand/arm weakness
  • Issues with chewing or swallowing
  • Leg/foot weakness
  • Memory problems
  • Muscle tightness or stiffness
  • Numbness/tingling
  • Pain, burning, itching
  • Sexual problems
  • Speech changes
  • Vision loss

Information source: H.P.ACTHAR - MS relapse


Acthar is indicated for the treatment of acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in adults. Controlled clinical trials have shown Acthar to be effective in speeding the resolution of acute relapses of multiple sclerosis. However, there is no evidence that it affects the ultimate outcome or natural history of the disease.

CLICK to Learn More




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Learn how to recognize MS relapse symptoms


Itʼs a time for change.

As the leaves turn color and the weather gets cooler, itʼs important to remember that as the seasons change so can multiple sclerosis relapse symptoms. We canʼt decide how the shifting seasons may affect how often we experience relapses, but we can be prepared to effectively manage relapses.

Prepare for change.

Learn how to recognize MS relapse symptoms.

There is no blueprint for how seasons may affect MS relapses and Acthar wonʼt prevent potential seasonal effects, but it may help speed your recovery from an MS relapse
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Be ready, regardless of the season.

Find out more about how you can manage the various symptoms of an MS relapse.



PS: Want to hear the stories of others with MS?
Sign up now to attend an Acthar live program near you.



–Your Questcor Team











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UNDERSTAND MS RELAPSES


UNDERSTAND MS RELAPSES


As a person with multiple sclerosis (MS), you know firsthand the profound impact MS relapses can have on your life. MS relapses vary from person to person. For you it may appear as mild symptoms such as numbness in your limbs. Or it could affect your ability to walk or your vision.
Yet as unpredictable as MS flare ups are, treatment options do exist.
Learning more about MS relapses—and how Acthar may help you treat yours—is the first step toward taking a more active role in your management of MS relapses.

What are MS Relapses?

MS is caused by damage to the protective covering that surrounds your nerve cells. This covering is called the myelin sheath.
MS nerve damage is caused by inflammation. This inflammation occurs when the body's own immune cells attack the nervous system. Damage can happen in:
  • Any area of the brain
  • The optic nerve
  • The spinal cord
For an attack to be considered an MS relapse, it must meet the following criteria:
  • Old symptoms of MS become worse or new symptoms appear
  • New or worsening symptoms last at least 24 hours
  • Symptoms occur at least 30 days after the last relapse
  • There is no other explanation of the symptoms
MS flare ups can last anywhere from days to weeks, but they may last for months. They can result in permanent disability.
Talk to your doctor about your symptoms to find out if you may be experiencing an MS relapse. And ask your doctor about Acthar. Together you may be able to determine if it's a good treatment option for you











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Sunday, September 21, 2014

Discomfort by a disabled person from the silent stares received in public

Solid Stigma

We have shared thoughts and compared experiences about how the chronically healthy view those of us with obvious disability. This is about discomfort, the silent stares or averted eyes as a wheelchair or even a walker come around the corner and into view. But then there are our brothers and sisters, friends with a different disease, those who face pure discrimination each day.

Mental illness is just another chronic condition, plain and simple. It is no different from MS, lupus or Crohn’s Disease. Except diseases of the mind are dramatically different and have been demonized in books and films, even from the pulpit throughout our history. How the mentally ill are treated provides a useful frame of reference for dealing with the world around us and coping with our own conditions.
I wrote about Larry Fricks in Strong at the Broken Places. His adult life could have become a movie. Larry traveled in and out of psychiatric lockups and jails. He communicated directly with God, driving his car into his house to kill Satan. He swam across a lake to rescue children he believed were buried in a landfill and attempted to fly to South America to confront the major drug cartels.

And on and on. Larry lost a marriage and all his financial resources and descended to the depths of depression. He not only survived but found help and with extraordinary strength of will, pulled himself up and out of a deeper hole than I, for one, expect to ever know. Today, Larry is a rock of stability and leader in the mental health movement. But along the way, he has paid a price, both before and after recovery.

As with all of us, Larry has had to deal with the world around him. “How people view those of us with a mental illness may be worse than than the disease itself,” he told Today a few years ago. He called the common attitude, “the soft discrimination of low expectations.” Larry went on to say that people have assumed his brain is broken and he cannot be trusted again. “Look,” he told me, “the stigma is unbelievable,” adding, “people fight a psychiatric diagnosis because of what comes with it.”

So, I say to say to fellow soldiers fighting any neurodegenerative disease, think twice before feeling put upon or judged harshly by the world. I have to frequently say that to the guy in the mirror. We are but a piece of an extraordinary tapestry, not the center of the universe. We should look up and see all the stars in the sky.

the story written above is by Richard Cohen.


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Saturday, September 20, 2014

How is your sense of smell, demyelination in olfactory bulb.



September 20, 2014 

DeLuca GC, Joseph A, George J, Yates RL, Hamard M, Hofer M, Esiri MM. Olfactory Pathology in Central Nervous System Demyelinating Diseases. Brain Pathol. 2014 Sep. doi: 10.1111/bpa.12209. [Epub ahead of print]


Olfactory dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Olfactory bulb and tract pathology in MS and other demyelinating disease remains unexplored. A human autopsy cohort of pathologically confirmed cases encompassing the spectrum of demyelinating disease (MS; n=17), neuromyelitis optica (NMO); n=3), and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM); n=7)) was compared to neuroinflammatory (herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE); n=3), neurodegenerative (Alzheimer's disease (AD); n=4), and non-neurologic (n=8) controls. For each case, olfactory bulbs and/or tracts were stained for myelin, axons, and inflammation. Inferofrontal cortex and hippocampus were stained for myelin in a subset of MS and ADEM cases.

Olfactory bulb/tract demyelination was frequent in all demyelinating diseases (MS 12/17 (70.6%); ADEM 3/7 (42.9%); NMO 2/3 (66.7%)) but was absent in HSE, AD, and non-neurologic controls. Inflammation was greater in the demyelinating diseases compared to non-neurologic controls. Olfactory bulb/tract axonal loss was most severe in MS where it correlated significantly with the extent of demyelination (r=0.610, P=0.009) and parenchymal inflammation (r=0.681, P=0.003). The extent of olfactory bulb/tract demyelination correlated with that found in the subjacent adjacent inferofrontal cortex but not hippocampus. We provide unequivocal evidence that olfactory bulb/tract demyelination is frequent, can occur early and be highly inflammatory, and is specific to demyelinating disease.



The olfactory system is your concerned with your sense of smell and in rodents it contains stem cells capable of remyelination (olfactory ensheathing cells) In this study they looked MSers and non MSer and found demyelination was common in parts of the brain associated with sense of smell. There was also nerve loss too.This effect was common and was found in 70%of people. How's your sense of smell. ProfHawkes is our smelly neuro and carries around "scratch and sniff" cards in his pocket...how weird is that?

Source: Multiple Sclerosis Research



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Accelerated Cure Project for MS, EMD Serono To Study Treatment Outcomes

The nonprofit organization Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis is going to sponsor the launch of the Optimizing Treatment – Understanding Progression (OPT-UP) study in collaboration with biopharmaceutical company EMD Serono, Inc, a subsidiary of the german Merck KGaA. The study will enroll 2,500 MS patients, which will be followed for five years in order to understand the main treatment outcomes suffered.
Optimizing Treatment - Understanding Progression Study
The new agreement is aimed at supporting the creation of a database of the factors that afflict MS patients regarding treatment outcomes through a U.S.-based, multicenter longitudinal clinical research. The purpose of the study is to help physicians in their therapeutic decisions and interventions, as well as provide knowledge and tolls for the development of new strategies and treatments for MS.
“We have been working diligently with leading MS clinicians, people living with MS, biopharma companies, and foundations to design a study that addresses the most critical medical needs in MS today,” stated the president and CEO of the Accelerated Cure Project for MS, Robert McBurney. “We are thrilled that EMD Serono, a leader in the area of MS therapeutics, has chosen to take a lead founding sponsor role, providing the support needed to implement this important study.”




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Friday, September 19, 2014

Detailed results from Biogen Idec and Abbvie’s pivotal phase 3 decide study further define the efficacy and safety profile of Zinbryta™

Publication date: 18 September 2014

Today Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) and AbbVie (NYSE: ABBV) announced the full results from the Phase 3 DECIDE clinical trial, which show ZINBRYTA™ (daclizumab high-yield process), dosed subcutaneously once a month, demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in reducing disease activity in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) compared to AVONEX® (interferon beta-1a).1

These results are being presented at the Sixth Triennial Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis and the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS) in Boston.

“The full results from DECIDE demonstrate that ZINBRYTA significantly improved key measures of multiple sclerosis disease activity compared to AVONEX, including reducing annualized relapse rate and new brain lesion development,” said Ludwig Kappos, M.D., chair,  Department of Neurology and head, MS-Research Group, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland, and lead investigator for DECIDE. “These results help us better understand ZINBRYTA as a potential treatment option for people with relapsing-remitting MS.”

DECIDE Detailed Efficacy Results1

DECIDE was a two- to three-year, Phase 3, global, randomized, double-blind study that evaluated whether ZINBRYTA would provide superior outcomes for certain clinical endpoints compared to AVONEX. The study enrolled more than 1,800 patients with RRMS.
Primary Endpoint:1
  • Patients on ZINBRYTA demonstrated a statistically significant 45 percent reduction in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared to patients treated with AVONEX (p<0.0001).
Secondary Endpoints:1
  • ZINBRYTA demonstrated superiority in reducing the number of new or newly enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions at week 96, with a 54 percent reduction relative to AVONEX (p<0.0001).
  • The risk of three-month confirmed disability progression, as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), was reduced by 16 percent in patients treated with ZINBRYTA compared to those on AVONEX (p=0.16). This was not statistically significant.
  • Seventy-three percent of ZINBRYTA patients were relapse-free compared to 59 percent of AVONEX patients (p<0.0001) at week 96.
  • The risk of meaningful worsening in the physical impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) (> 7.5 point worsening in the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale [MSIS-29] physical score) was reduced by 24 percent in the ZINBRYTA group compared to the AVONEX group (p=0.018).
Continue


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