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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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Saturday, October 4, 2008

Pediatric Patients Have Higher Disease Burden at Time of MS Onset

Information provided by: Cherie C. Binns RN BS MSCN

(Below article, find a link to review a video of this subject)

Medscape

by: Allison Gandey

September 26, 2008 (Salt Lake City, Utah) — Magnetic resonance imaging findings for pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) can look misleadingly different from adult patients. These are the findings of a new study presented at the American Neurological Association 133rd Annual Meeting.

While the clinical course of MS is often similar between pediatric and adult patients, lead investigator Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, from the University of California, San Francisco, told the meeting that disease onset may be distinct. Childhood MS is estimated to represent up to 10% of cases.

"Children have a higher disease burden with more frequent posterior fossa involvement at MS onset than adults," Dr. Waubant noted.

» Read More

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Pivotal phase III MAESTRO-03 trial of dirucotide (MBP8298) in patients with Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis has completed a safety analysis..

Medical News Today

BioMS Medical's Phase III U.S. Multiple Sclerosis Trial
Receives Positive Safety Review
From Data Safety Monitoring Board



04 Oct 2008

BioMS Medical Corp. (TSX: MS), a leading developer in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), announced that the independent Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) for the Company's U.S. pivotal phase III MAESTRO-03 trial of dirucotide (MBP8298) in patients with secondary progressive MS has completed a safety analysis and recommended that the trial continue as per the protocol.

This was the third of several regularly scheduled reviews by the DSMB that will occur over the duration of the trial. The purpose of the DSMB is to provide objective, independent safety monitoring of the trial.

» Read More


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$5 Million for MS Research Secured in Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Information contributed by Dianne in Pa.

Federal Focus: Highlights of the 110th Congress

As the 110th Congress concludes, we must take time to celebrate our successes. Thanks to your enthusiasm and action, MS activists helped make significant progress on some key MS issues including: increased research funding; improvements to the ADA; passage of the stem cell legislation; introduction of a National MS Disease Registry Act; and, the establishment of the Congressional MS Caucus.



$5 Million for MS Research Secured in Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

As a result of your dedicated activism, MS was awarded a $5 million program within the FY2009 Department of Defense (DoD) appropriations bill under the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP). Many of you followed this piece of legislation as it made its way through Congress and, for the first time, the disease of MS received its own line item for research funding under the CDMRP. These dollars mark the beginning of new research possibilities.

Imperative to our success were our congressional champions on the House and Senate Appropriations Committees, who supported this request and helped make the $5 million research funding possible. Also of key importance are the 63 Representatives and 27 Senators who signed the Dear Colleague letter urging appropriators to fulfill this request (click here to find out which Members signed on).

Please take a moment to thank your Representative and/or Senators, who either serve on the Appropriations Committee or signed the Dear Colleague letter.

Many other legislators played an important role to support this request by a vote in favor of final passage of the defense bill, where the CDMRP is housed.



ADA Amendments Act of 2008 Becomes Law

MS activists worked passionately along side the disability community to help push the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) through Congress in 2008. President Bush signed this historic piece of legislation into law on September 25. The ADAAA will help ensure that there will no longer be discrimination against individuals with disabilities in the workplace by restoring the original intent of the ADA as signed into law in 1990.

Click here to learn more about the ADAAA bill (now Public Law No: 110-325).



Progress and Continued Hope for Stem Cell Legislation

Stem cell research, a hot topic during the 110th Congress, will likely continue as another major issue in the 111th Congress. Because stem cells have the unique ability to develop into many different cell types in the body, they are of great value to scientists and researchers looking for new ways to help cure diseases.

The Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act of 2007 (H.R. 3/S. 5) seeks to overturn the Administration's ban on federal funding for research on new embryonic stem cell lines and includes language to encourage the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pursue other forms of stem cell research. This legislation made notable progress during the first session of the 110th Congress. The bill passed on June 7, 2007 but was subsequently vetoed by President Bush, who now has twice vetoed stem cell legislation.

Click here to learn more about stem cell legislation.



Introduction of MS Registry Bill in Congress

Introduced in April, the National MS Disease Registry Act (H.R. 5874) seeks to establish a National Multiple Sclerosis Registry at the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Currently, a national coordinated system to collect and analyze data on MS in the United States does not exist. This registry would help us gain a better understanding of the disease and potentially shed light on possible genetic or environmental risk factors for MS.



Launch and Success of Congressional MS Caucus

This year, the Congressional MS Caucus was formed in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. The MS Caucus enables congressional champions of this cause to work collectively in order to help further the issues of importance to the MS community. The MS caucus co-chairmen are Congressmen Russ Carnahan (MO) and Michael Burgess, M.D. (TX) and Senators Byron Dorgan (ND) and Orrin Hatch (UT).

House and Senate MS Caucus achievements from the first year include: hosting three issue briefings on Capitol Hill; public recognition of MS awareness on the House floor; and, overall support for issues propelled by your MS activism.

Click here to visit the MS activist blog for an updated list of congressional MS Caucus members.


Thank you for being a MS activist. Join the movement at www.nationalMSsociety.org/advocacy.

To keep future MS activism messages out of your junk folder, add the following address to your contacts or safe sender list: MSActionNetwork@nmss.org






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Friday, October 3, 2008

Managing Your Symptoms

Today's new Feature Presentations are
Managing Your Symptoms: Fatigue
and
Managing Your Symptoms: Numbness, Dizziness, and Vertigo
featuring Dr. Patricia Coyle.
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Click here to view the webcasts, or copy into your browser:
If you have a pop-up blocker, you will need to disable it prior to participating in a MS Learn Online webcast.
More to come:

October 16
Managing Your Symptoms: Spasticity, Tremors, Seizures, and Loss of Balance
Join Our Mailing List

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Thursday, October 2, 2008

Stem Cell Therapeutics Announces Issuance of Australian Patent

SCT is granted intellectual property protection in Australia covering use of GM-CSF, IL-3 or IL-5 for Producing Oligodendrocytes

Last update: 11:31 a.m. EDT Oct. 1, 2008

CALGARY, ALBERTA, Oct 01, 2008 (MARKET WIRE via COMTEX) -- Stem Cell Therapeutics Corp. ("SCT") (CA:SSS: news, chart, profile) has been issued Australian Patent No. 2003250697, entitled "Oligodendrocyte Production from Multipotent Neural Stem Cells". This patent, issued on August 14, 2008, covers methods of producing oligodendrocytes from neural stem cells using granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin 3 (IL-3), or interleukin 5 (IL-5), either in vivo or in cell culture, as well as oligodendrocyte compositions produced by such methods. This is the first patent to issue in this patent family.

» Read More


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Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Be Your Own Health Care Advocate

Ask the MS Nurse:


We are often told that we need to advocate for ourselves when it comes to our health care. What does that mean and how do we go about that? There are a number of factors involved in advocating for yourself and knowledge of your body, your response to medications, diet, exercise, stress are all key in being a believable and adequate self-advocate.


Learn all you can about your illness. For those reading here it may be multiple sclerosis. I have heard from a number of MS Neurologists that the average MS patient today knows as much about their illness and the treatments available as they do and they see their role as a facilitator in the management process.


>>>>>> Click here to continue with this article.


Return to this page, to leave any questions for the MS Nurse

or to leave comments for your peers.

Thank you



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What Does "It Feel Like" to Have Multiple Sclerosis?

A “Creative Visualization” in to MS
By Julie Stachowiak, Ph.D., About.com
Updated: October 1, 2008

About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by Suman Jayadev, MD

Julie wrote: I was recently asked to give a talk to “team captains” for the MS15, the 150-mile bicycle tour between cities all over the United States that raises money for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. I don’t think any of the people in the audience actually had multiple sclerosis (MS), and only a few had loved ones with MS. These people take on an enormous amount of responsibility planning logistics for their company team and knowing a great deal about distance cycling, but not necessarily MS.

I wanted to let them know that their work was appreciated. I also wanted to let them know that “we” are everywhere. I wanted to let them know that just because I marched (rather than rolled) up to the podium, that I, and people like me, still hurt in ways that were difficult to see or understand.

» Read More

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Stress Management

STRESS MANAGEMENT

by: Susan Dorne, OT

With this crazy thing called life, everybody will feel stressed out at one time or another, and sometimes it can feel like forever! There are countless reasons that can cause stress starting from the time we wake up to the time we go to sleep. Some stressors are ongoing such as work/job, marriage/relationships, children, and finances; some may be sudden such as loss of job or death of family member; and some stressors can be positive, such as getting married or getting a promotion.


Stress management simply refers to the variety of techniques used to control and reduce tension that can occur in potentially challenging, frustrating, and threatening situations. The fact is too much stress can be harmful, regardless if you have MS or not.


READ MORE to continue with this story

Come back here, to leave your comments or to ask Susan Any Questions

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Back to Basics: 7 Easy Ways to Save $100 a Week

You're freaked out about money. Food prices are up, your home's value has depreciated and your job is on the line. While there's not much we can do to reduce the cost of fixed expenses like a mortgage and taxes, there's a great deal of miscellaneous savings staring us right in the face.

Here are some quick cash fixes that can save you at least $100 a week.

Limit Visits to the ATM
ATM transactions, on average, charge about $3 in fees. Take out cash from ATM machines that belong to your bank to limit fees, or ask for cash back (no fee) when you use your debit card at stores like Whole Foods (STOCK QUOTE: WFMI), Staples (STOCK QUOTE: SPLS) and Best Buy (STOCK QUOTE: BBY). Visit the ATM once a week – perhaps every Sunday afternoon before the work week kicks in - take out as much money you'll need for the next seven days and use that cash for your everyday expenses from gas to coffee, lunch and that must-have sweater that's on sale at J.Crew (STOCK QUOTE: GAP). Sticking to that cash with help you better budget and avoid the ATM during the week.
Weekly Savings: At least $3 to $10

Get Rid Of Your Landline

Use your cell phone plan exclusively and save at least $25 a month. If you need to make international calls, encourage your overseas friends and family to join you in signing up for Skype.com, which offers free VOIP (voice-over-internet-protocol) services.
Weekly Savings: At least $8-$15

Buy Generic Grocery Brands

Buying generic pharmaceuticals and filling your grocery cart with store-brand products instead of upscale labels can help save up to 50% on everyday goods. While the quality may not be identical, it's pretty hard to tell the difference between most products. Considering the average two-person household spends $200 a month on groceries, a single person could save a quick $50 just opting for basic brands. Want to cut another $30 to $50 a month? Reduce your eating out habits in half, since families spend more than 40% of their food budget on dining out, according to Consumer Reports.
Weekly Savings: At least $30

Self-Mani/Pedi
Beauty specialists suggest pampering your hand and toe nails about twice a month. That's at least $30 a visit, more if at a fancy spa. Instead by some white nail polish to give your French manicure tips your own touch-up, or go two weeks without a professional manicure – no one will think less of you. There's a much cheaper home remedy solution involving a nail file ($1) and nail polish ($6).
Weekly Savings: At least $15

Get a Library Card
It's free! From books to DVDs and WiFi, the library is a cheapskate's mecca, and makes Blockbuster (STOCK QUOTE: BBI) and Netflix (STOCK QUOTE: NFLX) look like highway robbers.
Weekly Savings: $5

Pre-Game
The markup on alcohol at a restaurant or bar is easily 100% more than the retail price at a liquor store. Next Saturday night when you plan on going out, first have a little cocktail party at your house to help limit how much you spend at the bars. And of course, drink responsibly.
Weekly Savings: At least $25

Nix the Gym

A UC Berkeley/Stanford University study found that average gym members visited their fitness clubs just four times a month – or once a week. That's hardly enough times to satisfy a $60 to $100 monthly membership. If you're not using your gym, lose it. Go for a run in the park, instead.
Weekly Savings: At least $15

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Tuesday, September 30, 2008

News from the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers

Contributed from: Cherie C. Binns RN BS MSCN on September 30, 2008

Multiple Sclerosis Resource - Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers


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MS Patients have higher spinal fluid levels of suspicious immune molecule

Published: Monday, 29-Sep-2008
Medical Research News

A protein that helps keep immune cells quiet is more abundant in the spinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), further boosting suspicion that the protein, TREM-2, may be an important contributor to the disease.

More of an immune-control protein might seem like a boon to MS sufferers, whose symptoms are caused by misdirected immune attacks on the protective lining that coats nerve cell branches. But researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found the extra TREM-2 was not in the right place to reduce aggression in immune cells, a revelation that could eventually lead scientists to new pharmaceutical targets for MS prevention.

» Read More

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Pumpkin Simulator -- Entertainment only

Provided by: Sherry in Ohio -
Giving you something "Creative" to do with your hands.

Pumpkin Simulator lol! give something to do....with your hands....lol!


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Monday, September 29, 2008

Todays Funny - "Memory's Going"

Memory's Going.... --- Contributed by Susan (our OT), in Miami

An eighty year old couple were having problems remembering things, so they decided to go to their doctor to make sure nothing was wrong with them. When they arrived at the doctor's office, they explained to the doctor about the problems they were having with their memory.

After checking the couple out, the doctor told them that they were physically okay but might want to start writing things down, making notes to help them remember things. The couple thanked the doctor and left.

Later that night while watching TV, the old man got up from his chair and his wife asked, "Where are you going?"

He replied, "To the kitchen."

She asked, "Will you get me a bowl of ice cream?"

"Sure."

Then his wife asked him, "Don't you think you should write it down so you can remember it?"

"No, I can remember that."

"Well, I also would like some strawberries on top. You had better write that down cause I know you'll forget that," his wife said.

"I can remember that, you want a bowl of ice cream with strawberries."

She replied, "Well, I also would like whipped cream on top. I know you will forget that. You had better write it down."

With irritation in his voice, he said, "I don't need to write that down, I can remember that." He went into the kitchen.

After about 20 minutes, he returned from the kitchen and handed her a plate of bacon and eggs.

She stared at the plate for a moment, became frustrated and then said, "You forgot my toast."


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MS Action Network Update

New Avenue for MS Research Secured in Defense Bill

Thanks to your help and activism, we are proud to announce that multiple sclerosis has been awarded a new $5 million research program within the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP). This is a tremendous victory and is the first time that multiple sclerosis has ever received its own line item for funding under the CDMRP.

The CDMRP is a program funded through the defense bill, which is currently attached to the Continuing Resolution (CR) that Congress passed over the weekend. The final step is the signature of President Bush, who is expected to sign early this week.

This movement is an example of the power of advocacy and the influence of a grassroots campaign. MS activists worked to steer this issue in the right direction and had confidence in the bold request for millions of dollars to establish a new program. Every activist played an important role in gaining this new ground, whether it was being a voice at a congressional meeting during the Public Policy Conference, being featured in the media, headlining informational briefings on Capitol Hill, participating in local town hall forums, or even testifying before Congress.

The Society owes a great deal of thanks to the other organizations that helped petition Congress for this new research funding. Those joining us in advocating for the new funding included: American Academy of Neurology, Paralyzed Veterans of America, United Spinal, AMVETs, Vietnam Veterans of America, and Disabled American Veterans.

Please join us in celebrating this enormous success. Without your dedication and participation, the establishment of a new avenue of research funding for MS would not be possible. Thank you for being one of our valuable MS activists.


Thank you for being a MS activist.

Join the movement at www.nationalMSsociety.org/advocacy.

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Sunday, September 28, 2008

Ask the MS Nurse...

Cherie C. Binns RN BS MSCN - is the MS Views and Related News / Stu's Views and MS News, Ask the MS Nurse columnist. Cherie knows that there are many who have questions and don't always know where to turn to ask, other than their doctor... Feel free to post messages here or to send her an email, that she will receive directly at her inbox: cheriebinns@cox.net

If leaving posted messages here, you can leave them anonymously, but will then need to check back for her reply.

Also, please post here if there is a topic you would like to see her write on, or respond to, in the upcoming weeks and months. She is quite open to suggestion.

So far, Cherie has heard from people asking more about the following
Depression
Fatigue
Insurance concerns
Disease modifying drugs
Symptom management

Are there other topics and what do you most need?

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