Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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CHAMPIONS TACKLING MS - AWARDS Dinner, Honoring Aaron Boster, MD and Jon e. Glaser, DDS - now open for registration. Visit www.events.msvn.org

Saturday, May 23, 2009

Synthetic Vitamin A-Like Molecule Blocks Early MS

Information for this article provided by Aileen in Delray Bch, Fl.
Source: Yahoo News

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- A synthetic vitamin A molecule has shown promise as an early treatment for multiple sclerosis.

In tests in mice, Christian Klemann and colleagues at the National Institute of Neuroscience in Tokyo found that the man-made retinoid AM80 prevents early symptoms of the autoimmune disease by blocking the function of Th17 T-cells, a type of immune cell known to play a role in the onset of multiple sclerosis. However, AM80 did not prevent chronic symptoms of the disease, according to the findings published in the June issue of the American Journal of Pathology.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) attacks the central nervous system. It severs communication between the brain and spinal cord, causing issues from mild numbness in the limbs to paralysis or loss of vision. The disabling disease affects about 2.5 million people globally, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

The treatment -- which unlike some popular MS treatments didn't suppress the immune system and thus subject the patient to infection and other disease -- could be a "considerable intervention strategy for the acute phase of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases such as MS," the researchers concluded.

More information

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has more about MS.

And / Or:

If not yet receiving the weekly MS Related e-newsletter, called "Stu's Views and MS Related News", then please click this link to complete the registration.

It will take less than 30 seconds and you will be rewarded with current MS information to your inbox each week.



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In India- Patients with multiple sclerosis to form human chain on May 27

May 23, 2009

MUMBAI: Diagnosed with a debilitating neurological disorder at the prime of his career, ad firm executive Nadeem Naqvi admits he was

near-suicidal a decade ago. On Friday, however, Naqvi offered the message of
hope as he joined fellow patients, actor-cum-model Milind Soman and eminent neurologists in spreading the word on a little-known condition called multiple sclerosis (MS).

The Multiple Sclerosis Society of India (MSSI), a support group, will organise a human chain at Masina Hospital on May 27 to spread the message of hope to those suffering.

MS is a chronic progressive incurable disease of the central nervous system. Naqvi said he was an active professional till he developed numbness on the left side of his body and was confined to bed for six months. "It was with the support of my family and friends that I was back on my feet,'' he said. Dadar resident Cawsi Randevia (54), too, said he would participate in the chain to encourage other patients that they could lead normal lives.

Neurologist Noshir Wadia said the condition generally affected youngsters and encouraged people to pay attention to symptoms like blurring of vision, weakness in limbs, fatigue and unsteadiness.

View source for this article, The Times of India


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Friday, May 22, 2009

From the MSRC-Uk : Tysabri User Diaries

Source: MSRC-UK

To aid those who may have been prescribed Tysabri® or those thinking of asking their Neurologist to prescribe Tysabri® we at the MSRC have enlisted the help of a number of people with MS who are now currently taking Tysabri® to provide some insight into how they went about getting given the drug and how the monthly infusions have changed, or not, their condition.

If you are currently taking Tysabri®, and would like to join our panel of "Diarists" please contact the MSRC Webmaster at squiffy@msrc.co.uk

View their website page to continue reading this interesting topic


( If not yet receiving our weekly MS Related e-newsletter, called "Stu's Views and MS Related News", then please click this link to complete the registration. It will take less than 30 seconds and you will be rewarded with current MS information to your inbox each week. )


Have something to share with others? If so, please use the post comment link found below. Your name and email address would be appreciated but is not necessary unless you want a response from others. Thank You
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Researchers identify pathway to reactivate myelin repair

Source - MSRC-Uk

UMDNJ researchers have identified a key pathway that could lead to new therapies to repair nerve cells’ protective coating stripped away as a result of autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). An article reporting their findings will appear in the May 13 online edition of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Myelin is fatty material that coats and protects the ends of nerve cells. The loss of myelin and myelin-producing cells impairs the ability of nerves to conduct signals. A severe loss may lead to erosion of nerve tissues and result in permanent damage.

“In people with MS that is relapsing-remitting, the body can replace myelin that has been stripped away,” explained Teresa L. Wood, Ph.D., the study’s lead investigator. “But, after repeated attacks, that process of replacement no longer functions well,” she added.

» Read More


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Protein identified as critical to insulating the body's wiring could also become treatment target in Multiple Sclerosis

source: MSRC

A new protein identified as critical to insulating the wiring that connects the brain and body could one day be a treatment target for divergent diseases, from rare ones that lower the pain threshold to cancer, Medical College of Georgia researchers say.

They report this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition that in the peripheral nervous system that controls arms and legs, the protein erbin regulates the protein neuregulin 1, stabilizing and interacting with the ErbB2 receptor on Schwann cells so they can make myelin, which insulates the wiring.

Their studies in mice have shown that when erbin is missing or mutated, the insulation is inadequate, slowing communication.

» Read More




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Infusion specialist likes getting to know Her patients

Chicago - Daily Herald - By Eileen O. Daday

On any given day, registered nurse Bev George may treat patients needing a simple blood transfusion, or deliver ongoing treatments to patients with multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease or rheumatoid arthritis.

It's all in a day's work for George, who works in the infusion center, located in the Physician's Treatment Center or outpatient area of Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield.

Continue to read this Bev George story from the Daily Herald article

( If not yet receiving our weekly MS Related e-newsletter, called "Stu's Views and MS Related News", then please click this link to complete the registration. It will take less than 30 seconds and you will be rewarded with current MS information to your inbox each week. )


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Thursday, May 21, 2009

National MS Society and MS Learn Online Presents: Health Services Research

Today's new Feature Presentation
Health Services Research
featuring Nicholas LaRocca, PhD
focuses on:
  • Defining health services research
  • What we are learning from health services research
  • Positive trends
Click here to view the webcasts, or
copy into your browser:

If you have a pop-up blocker, you will need to disable it prior to participating in a MS Learn Online webcast.


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MS patients welcome close monitoring of Tysabri use

From the Chicago Tribune
Balancing drug's Risk, Rewards
The drug was like a life preserver, as Daisy Roque describes it, the first effective ally she had found in her battle against multiple sclerosis.

But when Tysabri was taken from the market in 2005 due to the appearance of a rare but deadly side effect, that preserver was pulled away from Roque, leaving her back in the thrall of the disease's progressive damage.

"It was devastating," said Roque, 35, of Crystal Lake. "It was saying 'you can't do this,' even though the drug is so wonderful, even though it was two years of having my life back."

But after the development of a unique monitoring system that allows doctors -- and Tysabri's manufacturer -- to keep close watch on every single U.S. user of the drug, it was allowed to return to market. Now, in light of encouraging results from that monitoring system presented last month, Tysabri may serve as a model for how hazardous drugs could be used safely in treating serious chronic illnesses.

Continue reading article from: Baltimore Sun.com
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A New Source for information on Multiple Sclerosis Medications

NeedyMeds.org and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society announce a new source of information on multiple sclerosis medications and the financial help available for those living with the disease.

(Vocus/PRWEB ) May 21, 2009 -- NeedyMeds, a national nonprofit, added a new resource page to its Web site tailored for those with multiple sclerosis. The page is a multiple sclerosis-specific source of help for those looking for information on the disease and financial resources to help assist with the cost of medications.

Find help with the cost of medicine
Find help with the cost of medicine

The resource page, created in collaboration with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, provides information on this disease including an overview, frequently asked questions, research, and more. In addition, the page lists financial resources that help with the cost of the drugs used to treat multiple sclerosis, free clinics, and programs that provide other types of financial assistance.

This comprehensive information source is found at www.needymeds.org/resourcepages/ms.shtml or on the NeedyMeds homepage at needymeds.org.

NeedyMeds has the most comprehensive and reliable database of patient assistance programs available. All the information is free, easy to access, and updated regularly. There is no registration process or need for users to enter any personal information.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society offers an information and referral line, support groups, patient education and research. Links to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and its chapters, programs and services are also found on the resource page.

This collaboration of NeedyMeds and the National MS Society was created to reach a larger group of people needing support and assistance in a time of shrinking resources. Both organizations are committed to serving those in need.

About NeedyMeds:
NeedyMeds, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit, is a comprehensive and reliable source of information on assistance available for people having difficulties paying for their medications or health care. The Web site (www.needymeds.org) is visited by approximately 12,000 people each workday. All of NeedyMeds' information is always free, easy to access, and updated regularly. Unlike similar sites, NeedyMeds requires no registration. All the information is easily printed.

About the National Multiple Sclerosis Society:
The National MS Society is a collective of passionate individuals who want to do something about MS now — to move together toward a world free of multiple sclerosis. MS stops people from moving. We exist to make sure it doesn’t. Join the Movement at nationalMSsociety.org or 1-800-344-4867 (1-800-FIGHT-MS).

Contact:
Richard J. Sagall, MD
NeedyMeds.org
P.O. Box 219, Gloucester, MA 01931
Tel: 978-281-6666
Fax: 419-858-7221


source for this posting: PR WEB.com

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TWO WOMAN CLIMBERS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS NEAR SUMMIT OF MT EVEREST

TWO WOMAN CLIMBERS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS NEAR SUMMIT OF MT EVEREST IN LEAD UP TO FIRST WORLD MS DAY

Posted on:20 May 09

LEAD UP TO FIRST EVER WORLD MS DAY ON WEDNESDAY 27 MAY 2009

London Wednesday 20 May, 2009

American climbers Wendy Booker and Lori Schneider who both have Multiple Sclerosis are due to make their final assault on Mt Everest in the next 48 hours in the lead up to the first ever World MS Day.

Climbing in separate teams, they are believed to be the first people diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis to attempt to reach the top of Mt. Everest. If she succeeds, Lori Schneider intends unveiling a flag with the logo of World MS Day at the summit (www.worldmsday.org)

This first ever World MS Day (Wednesday 27 May 2009) aims to be a day of unity, strength and solidarity, where people affected by MS across the world are urged to come together to take positive action on MS. The goal is to mobilise and expand the global MS movement by encouraging people to talk about their MS experiences, donate to support people affected by MS and to fund research, join MS organisations and encourage politicians to take action. It has been organised by the London-based Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (www.msif.org) and by MS Societies in 54 countries around the world.

To continue reading this article and to get more information on World MS Day, click here

SHARE your worldly experiences by leaving a comment.

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Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Detecting Nervous System Repair in MS: International Workshop Findings Published

May 18, 2009 - Source : National MS Society

What if a new therapy was developed to protect brain cells from damage and even regenerate new cells to repair damage caused by MS, but there was no way to prove that it works? The question of how to detect nervous system protection and repair in people with MS – without having to wait possibly years to observe a person’s disease progression – was the theme of a workshop recently convened in Amsterdam by the National MS Society’s International Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials. The workshop, co-chaired by Frederik Barkhof, MD, PhD (VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam) and Peter Calabresi, MD (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore), included nearly 60 participants from North America and Europe who grappled with key questions about applying emerging technologies to clinical trials of repair and protection therapies. The workshop discussions and background literature formed the basis of a new paper published in the May 2009 issue of Nature Reviews Neurology 5, 256-266 – free access to all readers).

To finish reading this article, click here to read from the NMSS website

Have something to share with others? If so, please use the post comment link found below. Your name and email address would be appreciated but is not necessary unless you want a response from others. Thank You
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Clinical Trials in Multiple Sclerosis 2009

May 19, 2009 - Source: National MS Society

We’re pleased to present our annual listing of Clinical Trials in MS 2009 (PDF), featuring ongoing MS trials, as well as those that are being planned or that have been recently completed. This year’s list of 129 studies indicates an exciting time in MS research, with therapies progressing through the drug development pipeline.

This list is prepared from materials provided by investigators, published literature and public presentations. While we strive for accuracy and completeness, there are trials that were not included because we were unable to gather sufficient information about them, and there may be inaccuracies due to changes in protocol.

Because recruitment information changes frequently, we do not indicate which studies on this list are enrolling patients. Read more about studies that are recruiting people with MS, and make use of valuable tools for helping people to navigate the complicated process of clinical trials participation. Click here to continue directly fromthe MS Society's webpage for this topic then click their links to continue.


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Multiple Sclerosis patients managed by a specialty pharmacy program were more compliant with medication

Study reports MS medication possession ratio of 86 percent

ORLANDO, Fla.—May 19, 2009—Multiple sclerosis patients managed by a specialty pharmacy program were more compliant with medication, and had a lower risk of being hospitalized for their disease than those who were not managed by a specialty pharmacy program, according to a study completed by HealthCore, Inc.

HealthCore researcher Jingbo Yu presented the study today at the International Society of Pharmacoeconomic and Outcomes Research 14th Annual International Meeting in Orlando, Fla. The retrospective study analyzed medical and pharmacy claims data.

The HealthCore study compared 3,055 patients managed by PrecisionRx Specialty Solutions to 807 patients who were not part of a specialty pharmacy-managed group over a period of one year. PrecisionRx provided patient education materials, regularly scheduled nurse calls and refill reminders to its members.

To continue to read this wellpoint article, click here
source: Eureka Alerts


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Multiple Sclerosis: Non-Toxic Drugs? * vs. Needs for Quality of Life ! *

  1. First, is an email I received today from Julie Stachowiak, Ph.D. of ms.about.com.
  2. Following her email, is my response to what is presently going on with me on my choices.
  3. After that, it would be nice to receive your responses, for ME and for others who might feel the same as me. PLEASE DO RESPOND if you can.

Subject: About Multiple Sclerosis: Non-Toxic Drugs?
from Julie Stachowiak, Ph.D.
I spent the weekend writing some articles (will come out next week) on Novantrone and Tysabri. I'll start by saying that these drugs can have amazing effects for some people - restoring lost function, slowing disease progression to a crawl, and preventing or slowing further disability. However, both drugs come with "black box" warnings and fairly formidable lists of potential side effects, interactions and contraindications. Even people who swear by these drugs will usually admit to at least a little bit of worry about the risks involved, eventually coming to terms with the statistics.

Wouldn't it be great to have some new drugs in the arsenal that didn't involve each of us doing a risk-benefit calculation before making the decision to take them or not? I'm not saying that we have found the answers yet - we haven't - but I am happy to see that research is being done on some of these more "friendly" approaches. Take care of yourselves, my friends.

Stuart's Response: Here I am, in the midst of completing paperwork to get me started on Tysabri and then I have to receive this email of the "BLACK BOX" warnings.Scary as it is already and me questioning my decision. However, I have already been on Avonex, Copaxone and now completing 7 years two months on Rebif.

What other choice do I really have, when my condition seems to be worsening.. Many others also have no choice but to turn to Tysabri.

Sure it would be great to have new drugs on the market without the arsenal that you speak about. But they don't yet exist and it might be 10+ years before we see this.Meantime why scare the daylights out of those needing to turn to Tysabri.I keep telling myself that I want "QOL" ( Quality of Life).. I am still walking right now. Needing a cane most often, but yet still walking and if this means to do Tysabri to keep from a wheelchair, then this might be my only option...
So though, now I have to have an image of a black box, while wanting my "QOL" - .......... MS SUCKS !! Regards, Stuart Schlossman


By using the comments link, please post what YOU would or what you may have already done, or if you just want to also say that MS Sucks, be my guest !!



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re: MS related Tweets from Twitter

A Twitter Tweeted me with this information:

Blogging 'Multiple Sclerosis Associated With Lower Cancer Risk' http://bit.ly/EIXkR
Blogging 'Gray Matter Under Attack In Multiple Sclerosis: Protein Could Provoke Immune Attack On Several Cell Types' http://bit.ly/16lNyM

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

MSIF.org - MS research news ( 5- articles)

Magnetization transfer ratio abnormalities reflect clinically relevant grey matter damage in multiple sclerosis

MS has been considered as an inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, mainly affecting the white matter. However, the grey matter involvement has been shown to play an important role as well in this disease. Moreover, the exact mechanisms by which the increase of disability occurs in MS are not yet fully understood. In this study the authors have found that the grey matter damage, studied by means of the MTR, a relatively new technique of MRI, could be more strongly related to long-term disability than the white matter damage.

authors: Fisniku L, Altmann D, Cercignani M, Tozer D, Chard D, Jackson J, Miszkiel K, Schmierer K, Thompson A, Miller D

source: Mult Scler. 2009 May 12

read more

Accumulation of cortical lesions in MS: relation with cognitive impairment

The grey matter involvement in MS has been proven to be important. In this study the authors have studied the behaviour of grey matter lesions over time and their relationship with cognitive function. They concluded that the number of lesions appearing in the cortical grey matter seems to increase over time and, more interestingly, that these cortical lesions are related to cognitive decline.

authors: Roosendaal S, Moraal B, Pouwels P, Vrenken H, Castelijns J, Barkhof F, Geurts J

source: Mult Scler. 2009 May 12

read more

Diffusely abnormal white matter in chronic multiple sclerosis: imaging and histopathologic analysis

In MS, a disease characterised by the appearance of inflammatory-demyelinating lesions in the white matter, some abnormalities, generally diffuse and not well-defined, in the brain tissue which does not contain the typical lesions can also be seen with the conventional MRI techniques. The meaning of these diffuse abnormalities is not fully understood. In this article the authors have studied the brains (post-mortem) of people with MS and have looked at these regions containing diffuse abnormalities. They concluded that these regions reflect the chronic loss of myelin and axons. As these regions are likely to be contributing to disability in MS, the authors proposed that these abnormalities could be considered as MRI markers of disease progression.

authors: Seewann A, Vrenken H, van der Valk P, Blezer EL, Knol DL, Castelijns JA, Polman CH, Pouwels PJ, Barkhof F, Geurts JJ

source: Arch Neurol. 2009 May;66(5):601-9

read more

A single, early magnetic resonance imaging study in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

The diagnosis of MS is based on the demonstration of dissemination in space and time of the inflammatory-demyelinating processes characteristic of MS. Over the recent years the diagnostic procedure has evolved and has been simplified, but still at present is quite complex. While before 2001 at least two relapses were required to diagnose MS, since then, the demonstration that new lesions have appeared on the MRI, by comparing two different scans performed in different moments after the first relapse, was enough to have the diagnosis of MS. The authors of this study have demonstrated that with just a single MRI scan of the brain, even performed very early after the first episode, the diagnosis of MS can be made, when certain features indicating dissemination in space and time are present. The results of this work are very important because they might lead to a simplification of the current diagnostic criteria for MS.

authors: Rovira A, Swanton J, Tintoré M, Huerga E, Barkhof F, Filippi M, Frederiksen JL, Langkilde A, Miszkiel K, Polman C, Rovaris M, Sastre-Garriga J, Miller D, Montalban X

source: Arch Neurol. 2009 May;66(5):587-92

read more

Glatiramer acetate treatment in PPMS: Why males appear to respond favorably

In 2007, a clinical trial of glatiramer acetate (GA, Copaxone®) in primary progressive MS (PPMS) was carried out. Though GA did not turn out to be effective in PPMS, when only the male population was observed, some hints of efficacy of GA were suggested. In this article the authors aimed to investigate whether the effect of GA during the clinical trial could have caused different effects in men and in women. However, the authors finally concluded that GA would seem to have caused the same (not significant) clinical effects in men and women. Then, if some differences between both sexes were observed during the trial, these should be attributed to other incidental clinical factors apart from gender.

authors: Wolinsky JS, Shochat T, Weiss S, Ladkani D; for the PROMiSe Trial Study Group

source: J Neurol Sci. 2009 May 7

read more


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Glutamate identified as predictor of disease progression in multiple sclerosis

UCSF researchers have identified a correlation between higher levels of glutamate, which occurs naturally in the brain as a byproduct of metabolism, and greater disease burden in multiple sclerosis patients. The study is the first to measure glutamate toxicity in the brain over time and suggests an improved method for tracking the disease and predicting its course.

The research team employed a novel technique, developed by Radhika Srinivasan, PhD, study author and assistant researcher in the UCSF Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, to measure glutamate levels in clinical trial patients. The technique was based on a sophisticated form of imaging known as proton MR spectroscopy, which uses simple radio-frequency pulses targeting specific brain chemicals.

Study findings were presented today (April 29, 2009) during the American Academy of Neurology annual scientific meeting in Seattle.

To read more, click here, to read from the UCSF News office


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Two Birds with One Stone / Six Questions with David Lyons an MS Patient

Written by MSF Staff writer Kasey Minnis
19 May 2009

When I recently polled our readers about what you'd like to see in this blog (and thanks to those of you who responded), some of the options were "Interviews with interesting people with MS", "Links to other sites of interest to people with MS", and "Discussion topics." Well, I realized I can do several of those things at once! Why not just ask the interesting people with MS what sites they like to use, and what topics they would like to discuss?

So I give you now a new feature of this blog: Six Questions with...

While I'll probably end up doing interviews once or twice a month, I decided to kick things off in style. From now until World MS Day (one week left!), we will have an interview a day!
Starting with:
DAVID LYONS; TV/Film Executive Producer and founder of The MS Bodybuilding Challenge -- Click here to View David and read his replies to HIS Six Questions

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Multiple Sclerosis related: What's All the Fuss About Vitamin D?

After reading quite a bit about vitamin D deficiency in those of us with MS, I decided to ask for testing on my vitamin D levels at last week's physical.

The results are in! The "normal" or "healthy" measurement of Vitamin D is a number from 30 to 80. Mine was 9. Therefore, I will stop by the pharmacy on the way home from work to pick up my prescription-strength vitamin D pills. The doctor was not only concerned with the MS aspect of this, but also bone density issues.

CLICK here to read more of this Vitamin D story from Kelley, an MS Blogger


Have a story to share? Send it to me via facebook or leave a comment here
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If you had one chance to help reduce Multiple Sclerosis in Scotland, what would you do?

You Would Shine On Scotland

This is the question which Ryan McLaughlin, aged 14, from Glasgow, has an answer to. Watch the video to find out more, and please share this video on your Bebo, Facebook, MySpace pages. Help us protect future generations of Scots from Multiple Sclerosis by signing our e-petition and joining our walk to the Scottish Parliament on Tuesday 16th June 2009 to hand the petition to our MSPs.

CLICK THIS LINK to review the video that Ryan asks you to share

Ryan is aware of the effects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), as it impacts on the lives of 10,500 people in Scotland and one of of those affected is his Mum. His experience of MS made him determined to find a way to help the thousands of people who are fighting this chronic progressive disease, an illness which has no cure, and to lessen the impact of MS on future generations. So what is his answer?

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Have something to share with others? If so, please use the post comment link found below. Your name and email address would be appreciated but is not necessary unless you want a response from others. Thank You
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The Myelin Project Newsletter of May 19, 2009


See if you can find a familiar looking article with a name you might recognize:



Releases for 19-Apr-09 to 19-May-09

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL STUDENTS RAISE MONEY FOR MYELIN DISEASE RESEARCH
Author: Candace Root
Release Date: Thursday 14-May-09 10:00 AM
The Myelin Project Each year the student body raises money for The Myelin Project which was established in 1989 with the aim of... [More Info]
Posted by: Candace Root





MS NEWS - Ex-Salesman Uses Net to Inform, Persuade

Release Date: Thursday 7-May-09 11:00 AM
You may read the article in its entirety here ... [More Info]
Posted by: Candace Root


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Schoolboy petitions MSPs over vitamin D link to MS

May 19, 2009

A Times investigation into the links between vitamin D deficiency and multiple sclerosis led a 14-year-old boy whose mother has the disease to petition Holyrood to provide a vitamin supplement to all children and pregnant women.

Ryan McLaughlin, from Glasgow, decided he had to do something after he read an exclusive report in The Times showing there was a direct interaction between vitamin D and a common genetic variant, which increased the possibility of MS being inherited.

His mother, Kirsten, 34, became ill with MS three years ago and earlier this year Ryan underwent tests after he showed symptoms of the disease.

His campaign, Shine on Scotland, has started an e-petition and has already won the backing of J.K. Rowling.

Click the link to continue to read directly from The Times.
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An Inspirational film on a Young Bear Cub's Survival

Increible
Que bien filmada!
como lograron seguirles los pasos!
!!!!AUDIO!!!!
Incredible Film with a Happy ending
Of a Young Bear Cub

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An unusual case of 4-aminopyridine toxicity in a multiple sclerosis patient

Info provided by Karen D., in Coral Springs, Fl.

Acta Articles

epileptic disorder or toxic encephalopathy ?


We report the case of a 45-year old female multiple sclerosis patient, who accidentally was overdosed with 4-aminopyridine which resulted in dystonic, choreathetoid type abnormal movements in the four limbs, motoric distress, confusion and opisthotonus. There is little known about 4-aminopyridine toxicity. There are only a few reported cases ranging from mild paresthesias to tonic-clonic seizures. 4-aminopyridine enhances neuronal conduction at neuromuscular synapses and is indicated in the treatment of selected neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis, among others.

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Stupid ( Marriage ) Humor -- Definitely NOT MS related

Anger Management Joke provided by Sherry in Oh.


Husband says: When I get mad at you, you never fight back. How do you control your anger?

Wife says:
I clean the toilet.

Husband says:
How does that help?

Wife says:
I use your toothbrush.

Do you have something to share with others. To make them Laugh or smile or just to say that was horrible? Send and if at least G Rated and non-offensive, we can post...


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Monday, May 18, 2009

Stem Cell Progress not derailed by Controversy

Controversy doesn't derail stem cell progress
USA Today - By Dan Vergano,
- May 18, 2009

Almost unnoticed amid the revival of stem cell politics this year, progress and peril in the science behind the controversy continues to hum along.

Human embryonic stem cells, with their ability to turn into every kind of organ tissue in the body, have tantalized biomedical researchers ever since their 1998 isolation by University of Wisconsin scientists. Organ replacement tissues free from immune system rejection, grown from embryonic stem cells or from more recently discovered "induced" stem cells grown from skin cells, have been envisioned for a decade.

"At this moment, the full promise of stem cell research remains unknown, and it should not be overstated," President Obama said in March while announcing a lifting of the previous administration's restrictions of federal funding on human embryonic stem cell research. He added, "Scientists believe these tiny cells may have the potential to help us understand, and possibly cure, some of our most devastating diseases and conditions."

Continue to read at USA Today

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MS in the UK: Plea to Gordon Brown for stem-cell research millions

News.Scotsman.com
Published Date:
18 May 2009 -
PRIME Minister Gordon Brown has been urged to guarantee millions of pounds for research into stem-cell therapies for multiple sclerosis.

The MS society, which represents sufferers of the disease, said that without large-scale government support for clinical trials the new hope offered by stem-cell science may be lost.

It wants to see a specific injection of £3 million to move stem-cell technology from laboratories to hospitals. Four years ago the government announced £50 million for stem-cell science. But since then, the MS Society said, little has been done to promote research into practical stem-cell treatments for conditions such as multiple sclerosis.

Stem cells are immature cells that can develop along a number of different pathways. Scientists hope some of them may be used to create replacement neurons for brain and nervous system diseases.

Simon Gillespie, the chief executive of the MS Society, said: "Unless there's tangible funding of properly regulated clinical trials, people with MS will continue to see no option but to try potentially dangerous and unproven therapies abroad."
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Sunday, May 17, 2009

Give More, Give Back, Join the sMovement (not ms related)

Provided by Aileen W., in Delray Beach, Fl.

Aileen sent this to me thru facebook, saying: "I thought this might fit in nicely somewhere in your newsletter. Maybe it'll afford some other people an opportunity to brag about their hard work as well"!!
She knows I occasionally like to brag of my work...

Join the smovement. It's all about attitude & action. Mattering to the world all with a smile. Click : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tj0gs5Po_0 - to view this short video


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National MS Society Chairman Weyman Johnson says he was "born at the right time."

Information provided by Karen D in Coral Springs, FL.

Growing up in a family with MS, Weyman Johnson feels lucky to be born at the "right time" to get treatment. Today he's on the national board of the National MS Society, helping lead the fight against the disease.

That may seem odd for someone who has spent two decades battling a seemingly indomitable disease, but the Atlanta employment lawyer and adjunct professor of law has a unique vantage point on the MS movement's progress. His father and aunt lived with MS; his sister lives with MS; and Johnson received his own diagnosis in 1990.

Read More!

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