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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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Friday, June 18, 2010

Living with MS - A Day in the Life with Richard Cohen / Also David Osmond's Battle with MS

Top Story Living With MS:
A Day in the Life
 

When you're managing a chronic illness,
simply getting out of bed can be a challenge.
Richard Cohen tells his story. Watch Video

Also See:
  • 14 Common Causes of Fatigue
  • David Osmond: My Battle With MS
  


Source WebMD
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Primary-Progressive MS: Perspectives on Moving Forward

The National MS Society and MS Learn Online Present:


A new Feature Presentation:

Parts four, five, and six of a six-part video webcast series that explores:
  • Emotional and psychological issues
  • Family and social issues
  • Planning ahead
Click here to view the webcasts, or copy into your browser: http://www.nationalmssociety.org/multimedia-library/webcasts--podcasts/index.aspx
If you have a pop-up blocker, you will need to disable it prior to participating in a MS Learn Online webcast


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Wednesday, June 16, 2010

A simple blood test that can predict multiple sclerosis up to nine years before symptoms appear is being developed by scientists

June 16, 2010 - By Richard Alleyne, Science Correspondent - Telegraph-UK



Experts predict that the discovery could lead to early treatment to prevent the disease harming patients.
At present doctors have no way of picking up MS before symptoms develop and patients are frequently diagnosed quite late.
But now a team of Israeli doctors and scientists have found "chemical markers" on blood that will lead to a test for the disease.


Professor Anat Achiron, of Tel Aviv University's Faculty of Medicine, has uncovered a way of detecting MS years before the illness hits sufferers.
"We are not yet able to treat people with MS to prevent the onset of the disease but knowledge is power," said Professor Achiron.
"Every time we meet a new patient exhibiting symptoms of MS, we must ask ourselves how long this has been going on.
"We can diagnose MS by brain MRI scans, but we've never been able to know how 'fresh' the disease is.”
Her findings are published in the journal Neurobiology of Disease.
If doctors can predict the onset of MS early enough, intervention therapies using drugs such as Copaxone or beta-interferon drugs that stave off MS symptoms might be used.
"We theorised that if we looked at the gene expression signature of blood cells in healthy people, we could look for possible biological markers that characterise those who subsequently developed MS,” said Professor Achiron


Then come back here to leave a comment. Thank you

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The Orals are Coming. The Orals Are Coming - Will You Switch to an Oral MS Drug?

June 15, 2010
Written By Julie Stachowiak, Ph.D.,


It looks like the time when oral MS drugs will be available is getting closer, maybe even measured in months. Clearly (and unfortunately), not all of us have the option of switching, since the oral candidates at this time (fingolimod and cladribine) are for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.
However, for those of us that do have the option of switching from an injectible disease-modifying therapy for our MS, I pose the questions:
  • Are you going to switch as soon as you can?
  • Why or why not?
  • What do you think your doctor will say?

Continue READING


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Tuesday, June 15, 2010

For the persons you find illegally parking in a spot reserved for the disabled

Have you ever discovered someone illegally parked Small image of parking pad with link to purchase page.in a spot reserved for people with disabilities and wished you could say or do something? Now you can! Take action with our handy “Just a Minute…” is 60 Seconds too long parking pad. Simply slip one of these informative reminders under the offender’s windshield wiper and you’ve made your point.
Download and print your own.
Purchase 10-pack Special online.



Information found here was in the United Spinal Association, e-newsletter




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Myelin Repair Foundation's president Wins the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award

Myelin Repair Foundation's president and founder, Scott Johnson, recently won the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award for the entire region of Northern California.  This award is typically given to for-profit business owners but this regional chapter E&Y also wanted to honor social entrepreneurs for their work.


Scott Johnson was diagnosed with MS at age 20, living his entire adult life with the disease. He became a serial entrepreneur, starting multiple companies and consulting for the Boston Consulting Group. After he left the business world, he made it his personal mission to find a treatment for MS, applying his past experience in creating the Myelin Repair Foundation. With the MRF, he is now able to make a significant impact on other people w/ MS around the world.


Our hope is that the E&Y Entrepreneur of the Year Award will help to elevate awareness and interest in MS and in MS research among an audience of entrepreneurs. The next step after winning the regional awards is the national awards in November, and we need all the help we can get to get out the word to the MS community online.






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FDA Supports Fast Track of Genzyme's Alemtuzumab for Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

June 14, 2010


CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jun 14, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Genzyme Corporation (GENZ 50.30-0.35-0.69%) announced today that its alemtuzumab for multiple sclerosis development program has been granted Fast Track status by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This designation covers patients with relapsing-remitting forms of the disease.
The FDA's Fast Track program is designed to expedite the review of new drugs that are intended to treat serious or life-threatening conditions and demonstrate the potential to address unmet medical needs. Under Fast Track designation, alemtuzumab for MS is eligible for Priority Review and the FDA may consider for review portions of the marketing application before the submission of a New Drug Application (NDA) is completed.
"We are extremely pleased that our alemtuzumab development program has been assigned Fast Track status, and look forward to working closely with the FDA to expedite the program's review process," said Henri Termeer, Genzyme's chairman and chief executive officer. "Alemtuzumab is a potentially transformative therapy for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, and an important part of our future."
Alemtuzumab for the treatment of MS is currently being evaluated in two pivotal multi-center, multi-national trials, known as CARE-MS(SM) (Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif(R) Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis). The company's CARE-MS I Phase 3 trial is a randomized study comparing alemtuzumab to the approved therapy Rebif (high-dose interferon beta-1a) in early, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients who have received no prior therapy. The second Phase 3 trial, CARE-MS II, is comparing alemtuzumab to Rebif in RRMS patients who had active disease while on other MS therapies.
Both trials are fully enrolled and data are expected to be available in 2011.

 Continue reading About Campath(R) (alemtuzumab) and Genzyme


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CCSVI Study adds fuel to debate over MS and blocked veins


June 14, 2010

A study published online will add to the debate raging among the multiple sclerosis patient and research communities. The paper, published in the Annals of Neurology, says researchers found no evidence that blockages in veins play a significant role in MS.

Doctors from the U.K. and Germany said they performed extracranial and transcranial venous ultrasounds of 76 people -- 56 with MS and 20 healthy controls. Researchers say that only one patient showed abnormal blood flow in the jugular and vertebral veins.

"Our results challenge the hypothesis that cerebral venous congestion plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of MS," write Dr. Klaus Schmierer, a neurologist at Barts and The London NHS Trust, and colleagues.

The finding runs counter to that reported by Italian vascular surgeon Dr. Paolo Zamboni and a research team at the University of Ferrara. They reported finding impaired blood drainage in over 90 per cent of patients with MS.

A second study at the University of Buffalo found more than 50 per cent of patients had blocked or narrowed veins that impaired blood flow out of the brain -- a condition Zamboni has dubbed CCSVI, or "chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency."

However some scientists say the ultrasound test requires specialized training.



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MS Related: Mental Activity May Protect Brain - Hence, those with intellectually enriched lives show less cognitive decline even with brain atrophy

June 14, 2010


MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of intellectual enrichment may negate the negative impact of brain atrophy in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to research published in the June 15 issue of Neurology.

To determine the impact of intellectual enrichment on brain atrophy in people with MS, James F. Sumowski, Ph.D., of the Kessler Foundation Research Center in West Orange, N.J., and colleagues examined neuropsychological measures of learning and memory, and the lifetime accumulation of word knowledge in 44 MS patients.

The researchers found good scores on learning and memory tests among patients with mentally active lifestyles whether they had lower or higher amounts of brain atrophy. Among those whose lifestyles were less intellectually stimulating, the researchers found a greater association with slower rates of learning and lower recall in those with higher levels of brain atrophy than in those with less brain damage.




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