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Friday, July 2, 2010

An MS Patient's response, to recent chatter of CCSVI


Written by: Cherie C. Binns RN BS MSCN  - July 2, 2010


There are a couple of articles on CCSVI in this past issue of Stuart's e-newsletter that really concern me.   They are written rather professionally with what appears to be total acceptance of this as a factual cause of MS and the liberation surgery as a cure or drastic improvement measure.   This is NOT true from what we know to date.
 
The videos of before and after that were placed on youtube and have been reviewed by a panel of MS physicians and one believes to know the patient who tends to be good one day and doing poorly the next anyway so they feel this video does not show anything more than a potential "placebo effect". 
 
Another concern is that by merely ballooning the Jugular or azygote veins, you run the risk of almost imminent narrowing again.   There is currently not a single stent on the market anywhere in the world that is made for veins instead of arteries and there is a real fear that an arterial stent can dislodge in a vein and create a scenario where a heart attack of stroke occur.
 
There are several groups working feverishly in the US to study this phenomenon and try to come up with a fix for it to see if it truly does impact the course of MS in some people but we are not there yet.  
 
The posting of these two items is disturbing to me because of the implications in those who have lost hope or literally have not looked for it elsewhere.
 
Cherie C. Binns RN BS MSCN



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Research News on Oral MS Therapies

 The National MS Society and
MS LEARN ONLINE present...
Research News on Oral Therapies

A new Feature Presentation:
 

A video webcast that explores:
  • Oral therapies currently in clinical trials
  • Oral therapies on the horizon
  • Who are they for and what are they?
     
Click here to view the webcasts, or copy into your browser: http://www.nationalmssociety.org/multimedia-library/ms-learn-online/index.aspx
 
 
 
If you have a pop-up blocker, you will need to disable it prior to participating in a MS Learn Online webcast



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The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Qatar (MSSQ) has called for an integrated approach towards the care of those suffering from the nerve problems.

By Noimot Olayiwola
Staff Reporter



Al-Jaber receiving a memento from the SCH assistant secretary-general for health affairs Dr Saleh Ali al-Marri
The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Qatar (MSSQ) has called for an integrated approach towards the care of those suffering from the nerve problems.

MSSQ president Abdulaziz Ibrahim al-Jaber, speaking to the media on the sidelines of a one-day symposium hosted by the society and the Supreme Council of Health (SCH) to discuss various and latest means of treating the disease, said that there is a need to co-ordinate care of MS among different cadres of medical professionals.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease leading to nerve damage (neurodegeneration), which gets worse over time. 

The nerve damage is caused by inflammation, which occurs when the body’s own immune cells attack the nervous system. Repeated episodes of inflammation can occur along any area of the brain and spinal cord.
Researchers are not sure what triggers the inflammation but the most common theories point to a virus or a genetic defect, or a combination of both.

People with a family history of MS and those who live in a geographical area with a higher incidence rate for MS tend to have a higher risk of the disease.

“There is a growing confusion between a new technique for treating MS presenting with chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and the regular medications as there is no proof that this new procedure for CCSVI can totally cure MS or not. I want the patients to get the differences between the two solutions,” al-Jaber said.

CCSVI is a syndrome associated with a blockage restricting the blood flow from the central nervous system (CNS), through the cervical and thorac veins.

Continue Reading

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Brain atrophy responsible for depression in people battling multiple sclerosis

Study finds hippocampus is affected by imbalance in neuroendocrine system

Adding to all that ails people managing their multiple sclerosis is depression ― for which MS sufferers have a lifetime risk as high as 50 percent.

Yet despite its prevalence, the cause of this depression is not understood. It's not related to how severe one's MS is, and it can occur at any stage of the disease. That suggests it is not simply a psychological reaction that comes from dealing with the burden of a serious neurologic disorder.
Now, in the first such study in living humans, researchers at UCLA suggest a cause, and it's not psychological, but physical: atrophy of a specific region of the hippocampus, a critical part of the brain involved in mood and memory, among other functions.

Reporting in the early online edition of the journal Biological Psychiatry, senior study author Dr. Nancy Sicotte, a UCLA associate professor of neurology, Stefan Gold, lead author and a postdoctoral fellow in the UCLA Multiple Sclerosis Program, and colleagues used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging to identify three key sub-regions of the hippocampus that were found to be smaller in people with MS when compared with the brains of healthy individuals.

The researchers also found a relationship between this atrophy and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a complex set of interactions among three glands. The HPA axis is part of the neuroendocrine system that controls reactions to stress and regulates many physiological processes. It's thought that this dysregulation may play a role in the atrophy of the hippocampus and the development of depression.

"Depression is one of the most common symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis," Gold said. "It impacts cognitive function, quality of life, work performance and treatment compliance. Worst of all, it's also one of the strongest predictors of suicide."


Continue from Eureka Alerts

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Progressive forms of Multiple Sclerosis may have new and viable treatment options

July 1, 1:31 PMLima Multiple Sclerosis ExaminerLori Friend



Dr. Saud A Sadiq, of the Multiple Sclerosis Research Center of New York(MSRCNY), has this to say about their new findings, "We have opened an avenue of treatment for an otherwise untreatable form of MS. This is exciting news because it's the first time a treatment has been shown to be effective in the late stages/progressive forms of MS."
The MSRCNY and the International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice(IMSMP) put together what is called a retrospective, open-label, chart review case study of MS patients and intrathecal methotrexate(ITMTX).
The study followed 87 patients with secondary-progressive MS and 34 patients with primary- progressive MS for about 8 treatments of the ITMTX along with a one year follow-up after that 8th treatment or their last treatment.
The patients were given Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) evaluations which showed stability or improvement in 89% in the secondary-progressive patients and 82% in the primary-progressive.  There were significant improved means EDSS post-treatment scores within the 1st group, but they found the 2nd group didn't show as much of a change as the 1st group post-treatment.

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Thursday, July 1, 2010

Social Security is still a prime target for cuts

For 75 years, seniors have been able to count on Social Security benefits, even in the toughest times. That's why I'm so concerned about the deficit commission's meeting next week.
The commission has been charged with balancing the nation's budget – and, under pressure to find cuts in federal spending, Social Security is a prime target.
Social Security didn't cause the deficit – these benefits shouldn't be cut to fix it.
Over the next few months, the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility will continue meeting to develop recommendations on how to cut the federal deficit, and the risk to Social Security couldn't be higher.
Many members of the commission support cuts to Social Security benefits, including co-chair Alan Simpson, an outspoken critic of the program.
After a lifetime of hard work contributing to Social Security, you, your family and your friends deserve every cent you've earned.
I know you care about America's financial security – and so do we. But our leaders in Washington should crack down on earmarks and wasteful government spending – not Social Security.
Thank you for joining us in this fight. Together we can keep Social Security strong for today's seniors, and generations to come.
Sincerely,
Barry Jackson
Senior Manager, Grassroots



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Polar MS resources and Cooling Products

Polar MS Resources

More to know of the (MS) Liberation Treatment for CCSVI

Information provided by Ken W. in New Mexico


The Liberation Treatment is a potentially ground breaking discovery for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is a degenerative neurological disease in which the body's own immune system turns against itself, damaging the nerves of the brain and spinal cord. The exact cause is unknown. For instance, the disease is more prevalent in certain regions, namely Scandinavia, Scotland, northern Europe and Canada, while in the U.S., it occurs more commonly in whites than in other racial.
When MS strikes, the covering that protects the body's nerves - known as the myelin sheath - erodes; and as the disease progresses the nerves may be destroyed. Multiple areas of scarring known as sclerosis, which are viewable on MRI imaging as plaques, can develop, causing the nerve signals between the brain and the rest of the body to slow down or even stop. These short-circuits are what cause the symptoms of MS
See and hear more by clicking here, to learn of the "Liberation" procedure


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Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Montel Williams lobbies State of New York to legalize medical marijuana

June 29, 2010

Montel Williams, the former talk show host who now suffers from multiple sclerosis, is making the rounds here at the State Capitol today in hopes of encouraging the legalization of medical marijuana in New York.

Williams, who uses marijuana to ease the effects of his condition, noted 14 states and the District of Columbia have passed MM laws, and many other state legislatures are now considering it.

It's questionable whether the New York measure will make it through, and officials including Mayor Bloomberg have issued strenuous objections to its passage.

I had a chance to chat briefly with Williams, who says he's not giving up hope.



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Frustration over CCSVI bubbles into mainstream press (story and Patient video found here)

June 30, 11:05 AMMultiple Sclerosis ExaminerMike Szymanski


It's not a secret to people with Multiple Sclerosis that there's a great frustration about people who want to get the CCSVI treatment.
There are Facebook pages devoted to it, there have been angry protests, and there has been general anxiety among patients with the illness who think they can benefit from this new simple procedure by Italian vascular surgeon Dr. Paolo Zamboni. The story bubbled up to the boiling point and onto the pages of The New York Times in an amazing in-depth story about the procedure and the patient frustration.
In The New York Times article, it explains in great detail the intense demand and patient frenzy for the chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) treatment.


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