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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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CHAMPIONS TACKLING MS - AWARDS Dinner, Honoring Aaron Boster, MD and Jon e. Glaser, DDS - now open for registration. Visit www.events.msvn.org

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

New drug may help patients who 'possibly' have MS

KDRV Staff

October 5, 2010

Multiple Sclerosis is tough to diagnose because flare-ups can occur years apart. However, patients may soon be offered treatment 'just in case' they have the disease.

Doctors didn't exactly know why Nancy Rifkind had trouble walking. The notion was she had multiple sclerosis. But until they were sure, they called it "possible" MS. Without a confirmed diagnosis, there are no standard treatment options.

"You don't want to use an aggressive therapy in someone who has maybe initial symptoms, but very little findings on their MRI and normal exam," Neurologist Dr. Lauren Krupp said.

Researchers at Stony Brook University Medical Center are testing a less potent drug therapy.

"Teriflunomide is one of several agents that fall into that category," Krupp said.

The study will compare the pill to a placebo to see if patients with "possible" MS benefit from early treatment.

"It's still in the recruitment phase, and each person, as they come into the study, gets followed for two years and we see what happens," Krupp said.

A previous study is encouraging. When Teriflunomide was added to Copaxone, an injectable MS treatment, disease activity in the brain was reduced.

"Whether or not the combination was better than Copaxone alone, or whether that improvement was really just being driven by the Teriflunomide, we don't know," Krupp said.

What they do know is if a treatment is available in a time of uncertainty, it may be easier for patients to cope.

To see if you qualify for the study visit www.clinicaltrials.gov and put the code: NCT00622700 in the search box.

Article Source: KDRV


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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Analysis: Multiple sclerosis drug a wild card in Genzyme fight


NEW YORK/LONDON | Tue Oct 5, 2010 5:39pm EDT

(Reuters) - Unlocking the potential of Genzyme's  experimental multiple sclerosis drug Campath could be key to prying a higher price for the U.S. biotech from Sanofi-Aventis

Campath accounts for a chunk of Genzyme's market value already, but Wall Street sales projections vary widely.

Its role in Sanofi's $18.5 billion hostile bid for Genzyme came to the fore this week, when the French drugmaker gave its own estimate for Campath sales and left the door open to a higher deal price if given proof of the treatment's value.

"We identified this as one of the areas where we potentially had a valuation metric difference and this one would be a good area where we could do a little deeper dive," Sanofi Chief Executive Chris Viehbacher said after launching the hostile offer on Monday

Continue reading by clicking here



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"Providing You with 'MS Views and News'is what we do"
Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
 Multiple Sclerosis when registered at
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Novartis MS Program Guides Patients to New Pill, Covers Out-of-Pocket Cost


By Michelle Fay Cortez - Oct 4, 2010 8:57 AM ET





Novartis AG will pay out-of-pocket costs for non-Medicare patients who use the company’s multiple sclerosis pill Gilenya when the drug, to be priced at $4,000 a month, goes on sale in the U.S. this week.
The Swiss drugmaker will pay as much as $800 monthly in co- payments for Gilenya, the first oral medicine for the condition, the company said in an e-mail. Novartis will also help patients navigate testing and monitoring recommended by U.S. regulators who approved Gilyena on Sept. 22, paying as much as $600 per patient for that expense.
While many drugmakers provide medicine for the poor and help people with insurance, Novartis’s plan isn’t contingent on income or medical history, said Darlene Jody, head of Novartis’s MS medical unit. Andrew Weiss, an analyst at Bank Vontobel AG in Zurich, predicts peak sales of $3 billion a year for Gilenya, which will compete with Biogen Idec Inc.’s Avonex, an injectable drug that generated $2.3 billion in sales last year.
“It’s a pretty aggressive approach,” said Ira Loss, an analyst with Washington Analysis. “It seems like an enhancement of what was required. Maybe Novartis decided to build on that and make it a patient-friendly program. My hat’s off to them.”

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Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Mindfulness training 'can help with multiple sclerosis'


Healthcare News
October 4, 2010



The mental symptoms of multiple sclerosis can be eased with mindfulness training, it has been claimed.
Mindfulness training can help people with multiple sclerosis to reduce the impact that their symptoms have on their daily lives.

This is according to a new scientific study, published in the Neurology journal, undertaken by researchers at the University Hospital in Basel, Switzerland.

The research observed 150 people with relapsing, remitting or secondary progressive forms of 
multiple sclerosis.

It was discovered that mindfulness training techniques, such as meditation and a group-based talking therapy, helped to reduce feelings of fatigue, depression and anxiety in those with 
multiple sclerosis.

Reacting to the news, the MS Society's research communications officer Dr Susan Kohlhaas said the study was a welcome one.

"We know that symptoms such as fatigue and depression can be very troubling for people with MS and it's great to see clinical trials looking at these often unrecognised or hidden symptoms," she said.

Around 100,000 people in the UK are living with 
multiple sclerosis, according to the charity's research.

Read about Barchester expertise in offering 
multiple sclerosis support.
article source: Barchester


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Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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