Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews

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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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CHAMPIONS TACKLING MS - AWARDS Dinner, Honoring Aaron Boster, MD and Jon e. Glaser, DDS - now open for registration. Visit www.events.msvn.org

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Immune Regulation - Transdermal Patch for MS being studied


Immune regulation of multiple sclerosis by transdermally applied myelin peptides
The authors conducted a one-year placebo-controlled study of 30 people with relapsing-remitting MS who were treated transdermally with a mixture of three myelin peptides or placebo. The effects on the immune response in the skin, lymph nodes and peripheral blood were examined.

The investigators found that myelin peptides applied transdermally to people with MS activated dendritic Langerhans cells in the skin at the site of immunisation and induced a unique population of granular dendritic cells in local lymph nodes. In the periphery, type 1 and interleukin-10-producing regulatory T cells were produced, with suppression of specific autoreactive proliferative responses, and suppression of interferon-γ and transforming growth factor-β production. The results suggest that modulation of the immune system with transdermal immunisation with myelin peptides might be possible.
authors: Juryńczyk M, Walczak A, Jurewicz A, Jesionek-Kupnicka D, Szczepanik M, Selmaj K.
source: Ann Neurol. 2010 Nov;68(5):593-601.


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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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CCSVI controversy continues


No association of abnormal cranial venous drainage with multiple sclerosis: a magnetic resonance venography and flow-quantification study
The MS research group from Amsterdam aimed to investigate the intracranial and extracranial venous anatomy and the intracerebral venous flow profile in 20 people with MS and 20 healthy controls using magnetic resonance venography (MRV). Flow quantification showed no venous backflow in any person with MS or control. Similar rates of anomalies (venous stenosis/occlusions) of the cranial venous outflow anatomy were observed in both people with MS and healthy controls but given the normal intracranial venous flow quantification results, the authors concluded that it was likely that these findings reflect anatomical variants of venous drainage rather than clinically relevant venous outflow obstructions.
authors: Wattjes MP, van Oosten BW, de Graaf WL, Seewann A, Bot JC, van den Berg R, Uitdehaag BM, Polman CH, Barkhof F.
source: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Oct 27. [Epub ahead of print]

         read more
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Friday, November 5, 2010

Stereotactic Surgery Relieves Trigeminal Neuralgia in Patients With MS

By Ed Susman

SAN DIEGO -- November 4, 2010 -- Treatment with stereotactic surgery appears to relieve trigeminal nerve pain in patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers said here at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiology Oncology (ASTRO).

"We studied patients for a median of 5 years after treatment, which is the longest period of follow-up ever completed," said Tejan Diwanji, BS, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

At baseline, 92.9% of patients had a score of IV on the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity scoring criteria. After treatment, 57.1% of patients achieved a BNI score of I, 7.1% of patients had a BNI score of III, and 35.7% had a BNI score of IV. An improvement in the BNI score, defined as the initial response rate, was observed in 57.1% of the cases. Six out of the 13 patients were able to discontinue their trigeminal neuralgia-related medications. The median duration of relief for patients that responded to the first stereotactic surgery was 36 months.

No major complications were noted among patients undergoing the treatment. One patient experienced new facial numbness that was considered bothersome. Another patient experienced transient numbness.


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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Getting a Good Night's Sleep with MS

- MS Learn Online - 
From the National MS Society Presents:

A new Feature Presentation:


A video webcast series that explores...

  • Your mood's impact on sleep
  • Sleep disorders
  • Is it MS fatigue or a sleep disorder?
  • Tips for a good night's sleep
Click here to view the webcast, or copy into your browser: http://www.nationalmssociety.org/multimedia-library/ms-learn-online/index.aspx



(on a personal note --  this was a great and educational video for Stuart as the topic hit home)



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"Providing You with 'MS Views and News'is what we do"
Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
 Multiple Sclerosis when registered at
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Thursday, November 4, 2010

Sativex, a Medicinal Cannabis Spray, has been approved in New Zealand

November 4, 2010



New Zealand medicines regulators have approved a cannabis-based spray for use by multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in this country, says a big manufacturer, GW Pharmaceuticals.
Its Sativex treatment for the relief of spasticity in MS patients contains two cannabinoids or active ingredients - THC and CBD, and is the first cannabinoid medicine derived from whole plant extracts from the cannabis sativa plant.
New Zealand's was the fourth approval for Sativex following positive decisions in the UK, Spain and Canada, GW research director Stephen Wright said in a statement.
"We are delighted that Sativex has received positive endorsement from another of the world's most highly regarded regulatory authorities".





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Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Biogen Idec to cut 650 jobs, including 86 in Mass.

November 3, 2010


Biogen Idec Inc., a Weston company known for its multiple sclerosis drugs, said it will reduce its workforce by 13 percent, or 650 jobs, as part of cost-cutting efforts that aim to to realize annual savings of $300 million.

Biogen Idec's workforce in Massachusetts will be pared by 86 jobs to 1,900, a roughly 4 percent cut to the company's Bay State workforce, according to company spokeswoman Naomi Aoki. The cuts will come from all four of the company's current sites: Weston, Cambridge, Waltham, and Wellesley. Plans call for closing of offices in Waltham and Wellesley.

Some administrative employees from the Waltham and Wellesley sites will be moved to corporate headquarters in Weston, said Aoki.

Continue



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Tuesday, November 2, 2010

Wii games are fun, but people with multiple sclerosis also may find them therapeutic

Multiple sclerosis patients work out with robotic devices and video games aimed at improving mobility

November 1, 2010


Any kid can tell you that Wii games are fun, but people with multiple sclerosis also may find them therapeutic.

Wii's motion-sensitive electronic games show some promise in rehabilitating adults with MS, according to British physiotherapist Colin Green. "I have used the Wii system with various clients with MS with some success, in particular in the three areas of balance, aerobic fitness and co-ordination," he writes. Check out the full story at "Does Wii-hab work?"

But the medical world has its own devices and "games" that allow MS patients to exercise their arms and legs in hopes that the brain will relearn those actions through repetitive motions. Fox CT profiles how MS patients at one Hartford rehabilitation center use robotic-like devices and play games to improve movement. See a video clip of the TV segment called  "Video Game Therapy."




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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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The recent approval in the US of Novartis’ orally administered Gilenya (fingolimod) heralds a new phase in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

MS Drug Therapies - "What the Future Holds"

Over the last few years, the MS market has been driven by five disease-modifying agents: Teva’s Copaxone (glatiramer acetate), Biogen Idec’s Avonex (interferon beta-1a) and Tysabri (natalizumab), Merck KGaA’s Rebif (interferon beta-1a) and Bayer’s Betaferon (interferon beta-1b). From 2009, interferon beta-1b has also been available from Novartis as Extavia; this is the same formulation as Betaferon.

In addition to these, Amgen’s Novantrone (mitoxantrone) has been available to treat MS. Generic mitoxantrone is also available. Avonex, Betaferon/Extavia, Rebif and Copaxone are all used in first-line therapy for RRMS. They are generally well accepted and have accumulated comprehensive safety and clinical trial data supporting their use in modifying the course of the disease. Tysabri and mitoxantrone are generally used in second-line therapy in RRMS. Mitoxantrone is also approved to treat SPMS and PRMS. Both of these agents are associated with serious side-effects.

The arrival of oral treatments brings big clinical advantages:

The development of oral therapies for MS has attracted significant investment from pharmaceutical companies and the first of these have begun to receive marketing approvals, signalling another major change in the way MS is treated. In September 2010, Novartis won the race to gain the first oral approval in the US with its sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist, Gilenya. The product was also approved in Russia in the same month. Merck’s oral product, Movectro (cladribine) was approved in Russia in July 2010 and in Australia in September 2010 for the treatment of RRMS for a maximum duration of two years. However, the European Medicine Agency’s CHMP issued a negative opinion for Movectro for the treatment of RRMS.


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"Providing You with 'MS Views and News'is what we do"
Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
 Multiple Sclerosis when registered at
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Monday, November 1, 2010

Employment Matters: What happens to government benefits when you start working?



Q. I would like to work either part-time or full-time, but I am afraid of losing my government benefits. Are there programs that provide security while I return to the workforce? Is there any way to keep my benefits forever, or do I have to transition to my own income and private insurance at some point? I am not sure I can afford a personal care assistant without some financial help. All these questions make me nervous, and I wonder if it's even worth it to try to work.
Thank you,
Aaron, C5-6

READ this answer and more, when you click here



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"Providing You with 'MS Views and News'is what we do"
Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
 Multiple Sclerosis when registered at
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Sexuality Matters: Pillow Talk, Positions, PCAs


By Lizzi McNeff and Mitch Tepper


November 2010

New Mobility is considering digitizing its sexuality archives, including the popular print-magazine column “Love Bites.” Sex info never goes out of date, right? Let us know if you’d like to see more questions and answers like these from 1997 posted online.
Q. The most satisfactory sexual experiences I’ve had are with other people with disabilities. That’s fine, but how can I convince potential nondisabled partners that I have a libido and a responsive body?

A. If you want to become romantically or sexually involved with a nondisabled person, you may have to take the more active role in initiating the relationship. Open two-way communication about the relationship and your disability is what’s needed. The goal is to help your intended partner shift the primary focus to you as a person, and let your disability become a secondary part of the relationship.

But you may encounter a reluctance to talk openly about your sexuality. Here are some questions that can help with addressing this delicate subject:






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"Providing You with 'MS Views and News'is what we do"
Keep Informed and up-to-date with information concerning
 Multiple Sclerosis when registered at
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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