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Saturday, February 12, 2011

Study Shows: Damage to a particular area of the brain and a consequent reduction in noradrenaline are associated with multiple sclerosis


Reduced Levels of an Important Neurotransmitter Found in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

ScienceDaily (Feb. 11, 2011) — Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown for the first time that damage to a particular area of the brain and a consequent reduction in noradrenaline are associated with multiple sclerosis.

The study is available online in the journal Brain.

The pathological processes in MS are not well understood, but an important contributor to its progression is the infiltration of white blood cells involved in immune defense through the blood-brain barrier.

Douglas Feinstein, research professor in anesthesiology at the UIC College of Medicine, and his colleagues previously showed that the neurotransmitter noradrenaline plays an important role as an immunosuppressant in the brain, preventing inflammation and stress to neurons. Noradrenaline is also known to help to preserve the integrity of the blood-brain barrier.

Because the major source of noradrenaline is neurons in an area of the brain called the locus coeruleus, the UIC researchers hypothesized that damage to the LC was responsible for lowered levels of noradrenaline in the brains of MS patients.        continue reading


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Remain CURRENT with educational information of
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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From fractals come angels -- With computers and light, MS patient creates art...



Updated: Friday, 11 Feb 2011, 8:56 PM EST
Published : Friday, 11 Feb 2011, 8:56 PM EST
CRANSTON, R.I. (WPRI) - A depleting disease is not enough to set back a local artist -- and now her astounding images are attracting attention from around the world.
Many images created by Ruth Furtado now glow out of display cases at Pawtucket City Hall. You could call them an angelic accident. The life of the artist behind them is anything but easy.
She showed her virtual brushes to reporter Walt Buteau in this week's Street Story. "As I start to move them apart," Ruth said, "the figure begins to emerge -- in between."
Her specialty is fractally generated art -- with a basis in mathematics and geometry. The black center of a red image is where Ruth first saw an angel. "They just kind of happen," she said.
Then, Facebook moments happened. As has happened countless times before, one friend showed Ruth's pictures to his friends, and they shared it with their friends, and the electronic angels kept going -- reaching some twenty countries. They sparked comments and kind questions: "[One person asked] 'How do you create such beauty with light?' Which made me cry," said Ruth.
Getting anywhere is draining for Ruth, who suffers from multiple sclerosis. She met the Eyewitness News crew atthe MS Dream Center in Cranston, where many MS sufferers gather to help each other through the disease. She must use a walker on wheels to get from the car to a table inside. She needs help setting up her computer, which is how she creates the fractal angels.
"When my MS started getting really bad, I honestly started thinking -- I don't want to live like this for the rest of my life," she said. "But when this started, I realized... I have work to do now."
"I don't really believe they come from me; they come through me from somewhere else," she said. 
"And that's the part you worry makes you sound like a crack pot?" said Buteau. 
"Yes!" said Ruth with a laugh. "Just a bit."
Ruth said everyone seems to see something different.
View the WPRI.com video interview by clicking here





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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Friday, February 11, 2011

Exercise is Helpful in Managing MS Symptoms


In addition to being essential to general health and well-being, exercise is helpful in managing many MS symptoms. A study published by researchers at the University of Utah in 1996 was the first to demonstrate clearly the benefits of exercise for people with MS. Those patients who participated in an aerobic exercise program had better cardiovascular fitness, improved strength, better bladder and bowel function, less fatigue and depression, a more positive attitude, and increased participation in social activities. Since 1996, several additional studies have confirmed the benefits of exercise.

Inactivity in people with or without MS can result in numerous risk factors associated with coronary heart disease. In addition, it can lead to weakness of muscles, decreased bone density with an increased risk of fracture, and shallow, inefficient breathing.

An exercise program needs to be appropriate to the capabilities and limitations of the individual, and may need to be adjusted as changes occur in MS symptoms. A physical therapist experienced with the unique and varied symptoms of MS can be helpful in designing, supervising and revising a well-balanced exercise program. Any person with MS who is initiating a new exercise program should also consult with his or her physician before starting.

Periods of exercise should be carefully timed to avoid the hotter periods of the day and prevent excessive fatigue. With some guidelines, a good exercise program can help to develop the maximum potential of muscle, bone and respiration, thereby avoiding secondary complications and gaining the benefits of good health and well-being.
Video Webcast— MS and Exercise
MS and ExerciseThe National MS Society and Healthology developed the following video to help you learn more about the positive benefits of exercise and good ways to get yourself moving—and have fun while you’re doing it!



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"Providing You with 'MS Views and News'is what we do"
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Remain CURRENT with educational information of
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the MS Views and News  website.
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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New Guidelines for the Use of Plasma Exchange Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis (MS)


New guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) recommend that clinicians consider using plasma exchange (also known as plasmapheresis, a blood-cleansing procedure) for a number of conditions for which it has shown benefit. In MS, the guidelines suggest it may be effective as a secondary therapy for exacerbations unresponsive to corticosteroids in people with relapsing forms of MS, and may be useful for severe, rapidly progressive MS and similar disorders (acute fulminant demyelinating CNS disease). 

TO READ MORE, Click Here





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"Providing You with 'MS Views and News'is what we do"
.
Remain CURRENT with educational information of
 Multiple Sclerosis when registered at
the MS Views and News  website.

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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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Australian Study suggests: Risk of Having a First Neurologic Event is Decreased with Increased Sun Exposure and Higher Blood Levels of Vitamin D,


Feb 08, 2011
– Findings in line with others suggesting these factors may lower the risk for MS
Higher levels of sun exposure and higher blood levels of vitamin D were both associated with decreased risk of having a first demyelinating event that can be the first indicator of multiple sclerosis, in a comprehensive study undertaken in Australia, called the Ausimmune Study. (A first demyelinating event, in this study called FDE, is also known as clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), a first neurologic episode caused by inflammation/demyelination in the brain or spinal cord.) Some of these individuals developed MS during the study and others did not, however findings were similar in either case. Robyn Lucas, PhD, Anthony McMichael, PhD (The Australian National University, Canberra) and colleagues across Australia report their findings in Neurology (2011;76:540-548). This study was supported by the National MS Society, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the ANZ William Buckland Foundation, and MS Research Australia.
The findings provide additional support for previous suggestions that sun exposure and vitamin D may help protect against developing MS. It remains to be seen whether safe and effective strategies can be developed that utilize this potential protection without the risks involved in overexposure to the sun or overdoses of vitamin D supplements, and whether these findings have relevance for individuals who already have MS.
Background: In all parts of the world, MS is more common at latitudes that are farther from the equator and less common in areas closer to the equator. This latitude effect has been under investigation for many years. Previous studies have found evidence suggesting that higher lifetime exopsure to sunlight (through which the skin makes vitamin D) and higher blood levels of vitamin D may reduce a person’s risk of developing MS. This is an active area of continued research.
The Ausimmune study was undertaken to investigate whether increased exposure to sunlight in those living closer to the equator and the vitamin D that is produced in part by sunlight may be protective against MS. Rather than studying people who had already been diagnosed with definite MS, which could alter a person’s lifestyle and recollection of past events, the team investigated sun exposure and vitamin D levels in people who had not yet been diagnosed with MS, but who had experienced a CIS. A CIS often, but not always, leads to a diagnosis of MS.
The Study: The investigators recruited participants who were aged 18–59 years and lived in four geographic regions of Australia between November 1, 2003, and December 31, 2006. The four regions were characterized by differing distance from the equator. A total of 216 people were enrolled who had experienced a CIS. A total of 395 controls were randomly selected from the Australian Electoral Roll and matched to the CIS cases in age, gender, and study region.

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Remain CURRENT with educational information of
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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
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