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Friday, June 24, 2011

CCSVI news: Iron deposition and inflammation in multiple sclerosis. Which one comes first?

Published on: 2011-06-23


Whether iron deposition is an epiphenomenon of the multiple sclerosis (MS) disease process or may play a primary role in triggering inflammation and disease development remains unclear at this time, and should be studied at the early stages of disease pathogenesis. However, it is difficult to study the relationship between iron deposition and inflammation in early MS due to the delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, and the poor availability of tissue specimens.

In a recent article published in BMC Neuroscience, Williams et al. investigated the relationship between inflammation and iron deposition using an original animal model labeled as "cerebral experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis", which develops CNS perivascular iron deposits.

However, the relative contribution of iron deposition vs. inflammation in the pathogenesis and progression of MS remains unknown.

Further studies should establish the association between inflammation, reduced blood flow, iron deposition, microglia activation and neurodegeneration. Creating a representative animal model that can study independently such relationship will be the key factor in this endeavor.

Author: Robert ZivadinovBianca Weinstock-GuttmanIstvan Pirko
Credits/Source: BMC Neuroscience 2011, 12:60



Sourcing for this article: 7th Space
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Thursday, June 23, 2011

Rush scientist receives NIH grant to evaluate whether cinnamon may treat MS


A neurological scientist at Rush University Medical Center has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to evaluate whether cinnamon, a common food spice and flavoring material, may stop the destructive process of multiple sclerosis (MS).

The two-year, $750,000 NIH grant will fund research that will analyze the effects of cinnamon on the disease process in mice.

"Since medieval times, physicians have used cinnamon to treat a variety of disorders including arthritis, coughing and sore throats," said Kalipada Pahan, PhD., who is the Floyd A. Davis professor of neurology at Rush and principal investigator of the study. "Our initial findings in mice indicate that cinnamon may also help those suffering from MS."

Click to read more

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Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Why my MS relapse was not a relapse…

By Cherie C. Binns RN BS MSCN
an MS Patient's story

I have been pretty much off the radar as far as my writing is concerned for several months now.  If you read my article “Cytoxan as an MS Therapy” dated July 10, 2010, you will know that I have been on Cytoxan to manage my Multiple Sclerosis (MS) now for nearly two years at this point.   Several months ago, I began not “bouncing back” after each infusion as rapidly and I had fewer and fewer good days.   Here is what things began to look and feel like.

Tuesday mornings every three weeks, a drive of 6 blocks in our small seaside Historic New England town would have me at our Community Infusion Center.  Leah, my nurse, would insert a special needle into the port in my right upper chest below my collarbone (much more comfortable than having blood drawn or starting an IV) and withdraw 10 cc of blood from the artery leading into the right side of my heart (where the tip of the catheter from the port rests).  She then sent this off to the adjoining hospital lab for complete blood count, sedimentation rate and every other visit for liver function studies and a basic metabolic panel to assure that my blood values did not indicate a problem that would negate getting the Cytoxan that morning.  Once the White cell count was called back to her and was above **2.0 (normal count being between 4.0 and 10.0) she would give me a dose of Zofran over 15 minutes in the IV to combat nausea, wait a half hour with a slow drip of saline running then , over the course of the next half hour, I would receive 1500 mg of Cytoxan through the port.

**[With Cytoxan therapy, white blood cell count is    



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Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have discovered a molecular mechanism which could bring about the development of new treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS)

ScienceDaily (June 21, 2011) —
Dr Bruno Gran, a Clinical Associate Professor in the Division of Clinical Neurology in the School of Clinical Sciences, working in collaboration with Professor Paul Moynagh from the National University of Ireland, Maynooth, has discovered a synthetic chemical compound which inhibits the pro-inflammatory signals produced by the immune system in MS. What makes this chemical unique is that at the same time, it stimulates the body to produce interferon-beta, an anti-inflammatory molecule, that is commonly given to patients as an injected drug to treat MS.

Together, these effects cause significant reduction in the severity of an animal model of MS. The researchers have also discovered that cells of the immune system obtained from the blood of people with MS are more sensitive to the effects of this drug than those obtained from people who do not have MS.


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Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.