MS Views and News Be empowered with MS views and news. To receive The MS BEACON e-Newsletter, CLICK HERE - -

Please visit our MS learning channel on YouTube, which provides hundreds of MS videos presented by MS Experts across the USA, from many of our recorded education programs. Archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews -- Additionally, please visit our Social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Important Resources for the MS community are found on the left side of this blog.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Multiple sclerosis: multiple perspectives


By Jordan Gaines, PennLive.com community blogger 

Over 400,000 other Americans face it everyday. Richard Pryor was confined to a wheelchair in the last few years of his life because of it. Symptoms range from weakness to bladder problems to difficulty talking. Indeed, multiple sclerosis, or MS, is one of the most well-known yet mysterious neurological conditions we know about.

MS and myelin
MS is an inflammatory disorder affecting the central nervous system (brain/spinal cord) and its ability for nerve cells to communicate with one another.

Our individual nerve cells (neurons) have a fatty substance called myelin surrounding the long conducting axon fiber. If you picture the axon like an extremely long hot dog, myelin resembles hot dog buns lined up along its length.
myelination.jpeg

Myelin allows neuron communication to occur much more rapidly. Instead of generating action potentials (rapid electrical changes) along each point in the axon, the action potential can "jump" over the myelin. Instead, action potentials are regenerated only at each node of Ranvier (see above), where there are breaks in the myelin sheath.

In MS, however, the body's immune system attacks the myelin sheath, causing it to break down and scar tissue to form. This process is called "demyelination." As a result, communication slows significantly. Check out these teased axon fibers showing progressive demyelination (the myelin is stained black):


Continue Reading


..
Comments are appreciated. Note that All comments are moderated 
 If not yet receiving our weekly e-Newsletter Click here to: REGISTER -
so that you can be kept up to date with MS News and Information
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
LIKE this BLOG? - Please click the LIKE button top left


..............................

No comments: