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Friday, October 12, 2012

Sun Exposure, Age Related in MS Risk

An ECTRIMS report

By John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today
Published: October 11, 2012
Reviewed by Dori F. Zaleznik, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner



LYON, France -- The relationship of multiple sclerosis risk to patterns of sun exposure is more complicated than earlier research has indicated, a study in Norway and Italy found.
In both countries, individuals with little sun exposure during childhood and adolescence were at increased risk for developing MS later in life, according to Kjetil Bjørnevik of the University of Bergen in Norway. That's in line with previous studies around the world.
But examination of sun exposure at certain ages during winter versus summer showed that the relationship to subsequent MS differed substantially between the two countries, and in ways that did not appear to reflect merely the difference in latitude, Bjørnevik said in a platform presentation at annual meeting of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis.
Cultural factors, sunscreen use, and genetics most likely played roles in shaping participants' risk for MS, he suggested.

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