Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

=================

CHAMPIONS TACKLING MS - AWARDS Dinner, Honoring Aaron Boster, MD and Jon e. Glaser, DDS - now open for registration. Visit www.events.msvn.org

Friday, February 24, 2012

Teacher with MS fights to keep the music playing


By JESSICA MASULLI REYES
SPARTA -- In August 2009, Melany McQueeny, of Sparta, was traveling with her soon-to-be husband, Matthew McQueeny, to visit family in New York when she noticed a tingling in her ring and pinky fingers.
"I said to my husband, ‘I think I slept on my hand,'" Melany McQueeny said. But the "pins and needles" feeling progressed through her torso over the next three days.
By the end of the weekend, the 29-year-old knew she needed to call a doctor. After one month of tests, McQueeny finally had an answer -- relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.
"I was devastated," McQueeny remembered. "It has affected my hands and arms permanently."
While multiple sclerosis can be devastating for anyone, McQueeny was especially terrified that her passion for playing piano and clarinet would be cut short. She was concerned that her job as an instrumental music teacher at Mount Olive Middle School would become more and more difficult as the multiple sclerosis flared up.
It did become more difficult, but this hasn't stopped McQueeny.
Multiple sclerosis, commonly referred to as MS, is an autoimmune disease where the body's immune system mistakenly attacks normal tissue, according to Web MD. The disease damages the nerves of the brain and spinal cord, resulting in loss of muscle control, vision, balance and sensation.
For McQueeny, this has meant that feeling the holes on her clarinet or pressing the keys on her piano has become difficult. McQueeny describes the feeling as "rubber band hands" where at times her hands feel numb and unusable.
"I thought for a while that I wouldn't be able to play anymore," she said. But McQueeny practiced every day and used muscle memory to cover the holes of the clarinet. She was able to purchase a piano that was easier for pushing the keys.
"I work hard at it," she said.
These new techniques, including taking more breaks in between playing, taking medication and using a neck strap with the clarinet, have made it possible for McQueeny to continue as a music teacher and take her music career to a higher level.
McQueeny, originally from Byram, started reading music before words, according to her mother, and at a young age she started playing the piano and then the clarinet. She studied music at The College of New Jersey, before moving on to get a master's degree at Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins Conservatory in Baltimore.
She has played with the Hanover Wind Symphony and th Eastern Wind Symphony, but most recently she was asked to be a substitute principal clarinet for the Allentown Symphony Orchestra in Pennsylvania. She had played with the Allentown-based orchestra in October 2008, before her multiple sclerosis diagnosis.



..Comments for each blog posting are always appreciated. 
     Please use the link found below, to leave comments..
 .. All comments are moderated to reduce SPAM and bad language ..
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Click here to: REGISTER - For our MS weekly e-Newsletter
"Providing You with 'MS Views and News', IS What We Do"   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
..............................

Update: Genzyme Announces EMA Accepts Oral Teriflunomide Marketing Application for Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis


“As an oral therapy with a promising clinical profile, teriflunomide is extremely well positioned to provide an alternative therapeutic option to patients who are currently taking injectable therapies. Those injectable therapies make up approximately 80 percent of the MS market today.”



CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--()--Genzyme, a Sanofi company (EURONEXT: SAN and NYSE: SNY), announced today the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has accepted the filing of the marketing authorization application (MAA) for once-daily oral teriflunomide for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Acceptance of the MAA starts the EMA’s review process.


“The filing represents another important milestone for teriflunomide and brings us one step closer to offering a new treatment option to patients with relapsing MS,” said Bill Sibold, Senior Vice President, Head of Multiple Sclerosis, Genzyme.
The purpose of the MAA is to secure approval to market and allow prescription of teriflunomide in the European Union based on data from two completed pivotal Phase III trials, TEMSO and TENERE. These trials represent two of five efficacy studies of teriflunomide in MS that are completed or underway, making the clinical program one of the largest and broadest of any MS therapy in development.
An application to market teriflunomide in the United States is under review by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration.
About Teriflunomide
Teriflunomide is an immunomodulatory, disease-modifying oral drug with anti-inflammatory properties, and is under investigation for the treatment of MS. Teriflunomide blocks the proliferation and functioning of activated T and B lymphocytes – which are thought to be especially damaging in MS – by selectively and reversibly inhibiting a mitochondrial enzyme. Slowly dividing or resting lymphocytes are generally unaffected by teriflunomide, suggesting that the immune system’s response to infection should not be compromised.
Teriflunomide is being studied in a large clinical program that is expected to include more than 5,000 trial participants in 36 countries. Five efficacy clinical trials are either completed or underway with teriflunomide, making the clinical program one of the largest and broadest of any MS agent under development. In addition to the TEMSO and TENERE trials, the Phase III, placebo-controlled trial TOWER is ongoing in people with relapsing forms of MS. Another Phase III study, TOPIC, is underway in early MS or CIS (clinically isolated syndrome). Teriflunomide is also being evaluated as an adjunct therapy to interferon-β in the Phase III TERACLES trial. With up to 10 years of continuous use in a Phase II extension, teriflunomide has the longest clinical experience of any investigational oral MS therapy.



..Comments for each blog posting are always appreciated. 
     Please use the link found below, to leave comments..
 .. All comments are moderated to reduce SPAM and bad language ..
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Click here to: REGISTER - For our MS weekly e-Newsletter
"Providing You with 'MS Views and News', IS What We Do"   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
..............................

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation benefits patients with relapsing-remitting MS


In a new study published in the March issue of Radiology, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) shows that cognitive rehabilitation changes brain function and improves cognitive performance in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS).

"These results prompt the use of specific computer-based rehabilitation programs to treat deficits in selected neuropsychological domains in patients with relapsing-remitting MS," said the study's lead author, Massimo Filippi, M.D., professor of neurology at the San Raffaele Vita-Salute University and director of the "BrainMap" interdepartmental research program and the Neuroimaging Research Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. "They also suggest that fMRI might provide useful metrics to monitor the effects of rehab in MS."
MS is a nervous system disease affecting the brain and spinal cord. MS damages a material called the myelin sheath that surrounds and protects nerve cells. This damage disrupts messages between the brain and other parts of the body, leading to symptoms such as muscle weakness, coordination and balance difficulties, numbness, problems with vision, memory loss and other cognitive issues. MS affects women more than men and often becomes symptomatic between the ages of 20 and 40.

In relapsing-remitting MS, the most common type, patients experience a series of attacks followed by partial or complete disappearance of symptoms. The interval between relapses can range from weeks to years.

Cognitive impairment affects a large proportion of patients with MS in the areas of attention, information processing, executive functions, memory and visual-spatial abilities. Cognitive dysfunction impacts a range of activities, including work, driving and social integration.
For the study, Dr. Filippi and colleagues recruited 20 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Patients were randomized into two groups of 10. The first group received a 12-week program of computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation of attention and information processing and executive functions, and the second (control) group received no cognitive rehabilitation.





..Comments for each blog posting are always appreciated. 
     Please use the link found below, to leave comments.. .. All comments are moderated to reduce SPAM and bad language ..
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Click here to: REGISTER - For our MS weekly e-Newsletter
"Providing You with 'MS Views and News', IS What We Do"   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
..............................

MIMA - MS Research in Melbourne, Florida


(MIMA) IS conducting a clinical research program in multiple sclerosis (MS), called Orchestra, which comprises three studies.

Two of the studies are for relapsing multiple sclerosis (RRMS), called the Opera I & Opera II Studies.

The third study is for patients with primary progressive MS (PPMS) .


Please open the attached file to learn more of this Study and contact MIMA directly

For more information, contact Menna Kuczinski, CRC, MIMA Research Associates, Melbourne FL,
 Telephone:    321.723.1203  Ext 4812



DOUBLE CLICK IMAGE to ENLARGE



Five Quick Tips from Dr. Jack Llewellyn, Sports Psychologist and MS Patient



Everyone has adversity which creates "Mud in the Water" or mind clutter. 
Quicker recovery from adversity separates winners from survivors, happy people
from those just making it through. In my experience living with MS presents daily 
obstacles and in my latest book, Get the Mud Out of the Water, I share strategies 
that can help us to recover from these adversities in order to live our best lives each 
and every day.

1. Your Assets and Your Liabilities
Make a list of your challenges and a list of what makes you strong enough to overcome them. 

How have you used your assets to overcome your liabilities today? If you haven’t, what will you 
do differently tomorrow to use what you have in your favor?

2. Achieving Something Positive Every Day
What things in your life make you feel good about yourself? Do you cherish time helping your kids

 with homework or does it make you feel good when you encourage your coworkers? It could be
 something as simple as smiling at your mail man or as important as exercising to maintain optimal 
health. By taking stock of your accomplishments, small and large, throughout your day you are 
bolstering your confidence and filling your mind with things that are positive and affirming.

3. Surrounding Yourself with a Team of People Committed to Helping You
Everyone needs a support system, and in my experience with MS, that consists of two groups

 of people:
• People Committed to Your Health: It is important to find a neurologist you trust, who can 

help you find a therapy that’s right for you. Your healthcare team may also include a caregiver
 or other specialists. You can also take advantage of programs like Shared Solutions®, which has
 helped thousands of patients like you navigate this disease. Get in touch with other MS patients 
or an MS-certified nurse by contacting them at 1-800-887-8100.
• People Committed to You: Be it a friend, a family member, a coworker or a support group, find 

people to surround yourself with who care about your happiness and success. Are there people in
 your life who may be a hindrance to your success? Evaluate your team and make sure all of the 
players are invested in helping you achieve your best life. Visit www.NationalMSSociety.org to 
find support through your local National Multiple Sclerosis Society chapter.

4. Stress as an Incentive to Improve Your Life
Stress is a reality you can’t avoid. Make a list of the things that cause you stress and think

 about how to use that energy in a productive way. Address each item on your list pragmatically,
 thinking about ways to reduce the intensity of the stress the item causes or eliminate it completely.

5. Create a Positive Environment for Yourself and Live in it Every Day
Emotions make you who you are. Use your emotions, good and bad, for positive outcomes, or emotions can become devastating to your success. Create a positive mindset and a positive environment for yourself, and then make a conscious choice to live in it every single day.


COP111020702/120002

Source: Shared Solutions


..Comments for each blog posting are always appreciated. 
     Please use the link found below, to leave comments.. .. All comments are moderated to reduce SPAM and bad language ..
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Click here to: REGISTER - For our MS weekly e-Newsletter
"Providing You with 'MS Views and News', IS What We Do"   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
..............................

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Good news on multiple sclerosis and pregnancy


Many ask me about this and so, here again is information on this subject:

There is good news for women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant. A new study shows that pregnant women with multiple sclerosis are only slightly more likely to have cesarean deliveries and babies with a poor prenatal growth rate than women who do not have MS.

Plus, the women with MS were no more likely to have other pregnancy problems, such as preeclampsia and other high blood pressure problems and premature rupture of membranes, than women in the general population. The study is published in the November 18, 2009, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
The large study used a national database from all non-federal short-stay hospitals in 38 states. The data included an estimated 18.8 million deliveries, with about 10,000 of those occurring in women with MS.
The women with MS were more likely than women without chronic medical conditions (2.7 percent for women with MS compared to 1.9 percent for women without chronic medical conditions) to have a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction, defined as a weight less than the tenth percentile for the gestational age, as measured by ultrasound. Women with MS were more likely to have a cesarean delivery than those in the general population (42 percent versus 33 percent).



..Comments for each blog posting are always appreciated. 
     Please use the link found below, to leave comments.. .. All comments are moderated to reduce SPAM and bad language ..
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Click here to: REGISTER - For our MS weekly e-Newsletter
"Providing You with 'MS Views and News', IS What We Do"   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
..............................

Cognitive rehabilitation improves brain performance in patients with MS


Feb 22, 2012

Cognitive impairment affects a large proportion of patients with MS in the areas of attention, information processing, executive functions, memory and visual-spatial abilities.  impacts a range of activities, including work, driving and social integration.
For the study, Dr. Filippi and colleagues recruited 20 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Patients were randomized into two groups of 10. The first group received a 12-week program of computer-assisted  of attention and information processing and executive functions, and the second (control) group received no cognitive rehabilitation.
Aspects of the rehabilitation program included a day-planning task, which employed realistic simulations of a set of scheduled dates and duties to address the patient's ability to organize, plan and develop solution strategies; and an attention task requiring the patient to simulate driving a train, carefully observing the control panel of the train and the countryside while encountering several distractions at increasing levels of difficulty.
All of the patients underwent neuropsychological assessment and MRI exams at baseline and after 12 weeks. As compared to their performance at baseline, the patients in the treatment group improved in tests of attention and information processing and executive functions. The fMRI results showed modifications in activity in several brain regions in the rehabilitation group, compared to the non-rehabilitation group. These  modifications were correlated with cognitive improvement.
Analysis after cognitive rehabilitation found no structural changes in the gray matter or normal-appearing white matter of the brain in the treatment group.
"The findings demonstrated that computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation in patients with MS results in an improvement of the trained cognitive functions," Dr. Filippi said. "However, the structural integrity of the brain's gray matter and white matter showed no modifications in these patients, suggesting an impairment of structural plasticity."



..Comments for each blog posting are always appreciated. 
     Please use the link found below, to leave comments.. ..
All comments are moderated to reduce SPAM and bad language ..
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Click here to: REGISTER - For our MS weekly e-Newsletter
"Providing You with 'MS Views and News', IS What We Do"   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Disclaimer:  'MS Views and News' (MSVN), does not endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.
..............................