ABOUT this BLOG and How to use it

WELCOME to Stu's Views & MS News, a product of MS Views and News, a Not-for-Profit 501(c3) organization. Founded in 2008. Providing Educational, Information and Resources to those affected by Multiple Sclerosis via live seminars and via the internet.

Key-Note: Our live MS educational seminars average approx 65 people per educational program and SINCE our first program in February 2010, we have hosted more than 90 educational programs in Florida. In 2013 we expanded to Georgia and in 2014 we have expanded into Alabama and North Carolina.

Register at our website to receive our globally transmitted Multiple Sclerosis e-newsletter, currently being received in more than (90) Countries. Visit MS Views and News.org

Scroll to view All the resources found on the left side of this blog. Need to find information, use our 'search by topic' tool.

Be Empowered with MS News and Information

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Thursday, October 25, 2012

Positive Data on Sanofi's Aubagio - Analyst Blog

October 24, 2012


Sanofi ( SNY ) and its subsidiary Genzyme recently presented positive data on its oral treatment for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS), Aubagio (teriflunomide). The company presented data from the phase III TOWER trial at the 28th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS).

The phase III TOWER trial, conducted on RMS 1,169 patients, evaluated Aubagio in two dosage strengths, 7mg and 14mg. Patients in the 14mg dosage Aubagio arm demonstrated a 36.3% reduction in annualized relapse rate compared to placebo. The reduction was statistically significant. Additionally, a 31.5% reduction in the risk of 12-week sustained accumulation of disability was also observed.

Meanwhile, patients in the 7mg dosage Aubagio arm demonstrated a 22.3% reduction in annualized relapse rate compared to placebo. However, the reduction in the risk of 12-week sustained accumulation of disability was not statistically significant.

On September 12, 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Aubagio as a once-daily treatment for patients with RMS. Aubagio is currently under regulatory review in the EU with a final decision expected in the first quarter of 2013.

Competition in the oral multiple sclerosis market is intense. Novartis' ( NVS ) Gilenya already has a lead in the oral MS market with the product being approved in September 2010. Another major competitor could be Biogen Idec's ( BIIB ) BG-12, which is currently under regulatory review in the US and EU.

Our Recommendation

We currently have a Neutral recommendation on Sanofi. We are pleased with the company's efforts to develop its pipeline. We expect Sanofi to continue to contain operating costs in order to increase earnings in the face of weakening sales of some of its biggest products. We also expect the company to pursue bolt-on acquisitions.


Read more: http://community.nasdaq.com/News/2012-10/positive-data-on-sanofis-aubagio-analyst-blog.aspx?storyid=184233#ixzz2AKALJDMx


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Stu's Blog-Talk Interview with Ben Thrower, MD - Neurology



Stuart and Deanna interviewed Ben Thrower, MD Neurology Director of the MS Clinic at the Shephard Center in Atlanta.


on MultipleSclerosis-Unplugged

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Ezose Sciences Forms Alliance with Fast Forward to Discover Biomarkers to Diagnose Multiple Sclerosis

October 24, 2012

PINE BROOK, N.J.--()--Ezose Sciences Inc. today announced an alliance with Fast Forward, LLC, a subsidiary of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, to use Ezose’s GlycanMap® technology in the discovery of biomarkers to help diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS) and improve disease management.


GlycanMap® technology enables the study of glycomics via automated analysis of the sugar molecules known as glycans that attach to proteins in the body and affect their biochemical function. The speed and high-throughput of this technology hold the potential to discover new biomarkers and targets that can improve the diagnosis and management of disease and enhance the efficiency of development of new therapeutic options.
To execute the research program, Ezose will collaborate with Anthony Reder, M.D., Professor of Neurology at the University of Chicago Medicine and a recognized expert in the clinical and laboratory research of multiple sclerosis. The research goal is to discover new biomarkers associated with MS, enabling earlier, surer diagnosis of the disease, distinguishing it from other neurological disorders, and to identify sub-types of MS. These biomarkers would then be incorporated in diagnostic tests to improve prognosis, aid in therapy selection, and evaluate response to therapy. They would also be useful in guiding the development of new therapies by increasing R&D speed and efficiency.
Under the terms of a sponsored research agreement, Ezose will receive up to $390,000 from Fast Forward to support the project.
“In its support of biotechnology companies, Fast Forward is establishing a model to combine the innovation of researchers in industry with the insights of leading physician-scientists at academic medical centers,” said Scott A. Siegel, Ph.D., Chief Operating Officer of Ezose. “We at Ezose are eager to start work with Professor Reder to leverage the potential of our unique glycomics technology and serve people living with multiple sclerosis.”
“This alliance with Ezose is another example of Fast Forward’s commitment to identifying promising technology and novel treatment approaches to bridge the gap between research discoveries and product development that will speed efforts to stop MS, restore function and end the disease forever,” said Timothy Coetzee, Ph.D., Chief Research Officer of the National MS Society.

Read more
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Superheroes Swing Into Action For Multiple Sclerosis

Information provided to us from Gerson G., in South Florida

Make way Batman and Spiderman - five new comic book superheroes with the unlikely names of Axon, Gastro, Skinderella, Pump and Chi are helping children around the world understand the complexities of multiple sclerosis - a condition which can baffle leading medical specialists.

The superhero characters are the brainchild of Dr Kate Hersov and Dr Kim Chilman-Blair - paediatric doctors who became increasingly frustrated at the lack of good educational resources for children suffering chronic illness, or for children whose parents were affected by such illness. 

Their initiative has received some impressive backing - even the eminent British Medical Journal has called their comics a 'revolutionary medium' for children to learn about disease and disability. The BMJ notes that comics can convey educational messages about serious subjects in a fun and engaging way. 

There five superheroes, each a 'specialist' in a different part of the body, take children on an adventurous journey around Mediland - a living, moving planet shaped like the human body. 

Medikidz Comic Book
The multiple sclerosis offering is part of a growing portfolio of comic books, each targeted for a different disease or clinical procedure. More than 30 titles have now been translated into 17 languages and distributed in 35 countries. The comics are aimed at children between the ages of 8 and 15. 

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Hope For New Autoimmune Disease Treatment Using Rare Immune Cells

Information provided to us from Gerson G., in South Florida

A new study in mice where researchers replicated a rare type of immune cell in the lab and then infused it back into the body, is raising hope for a new treatment for severe autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

The researchers, from Duke University Medical Center in the US, write about their work on a type of B cell, in a paper that was published online in Nature at the weekend.

B Cells

B cells are immune cells that create antibodies to attack unwanted pathogens like bacteria and viruses.

The type that the researchers on this study focused on are known as regulatory B cells or B10, after interleukin-10 (IL-10), a cell-signalling protein that the cells use. 

B10 cells help control immune response and limit autoimmunity, which is where the immune system attacks the body's own healthy tissue as if it were an unwanted pathogen.

Although there aren't many of them, B10 cells play a key role in controlling inflammation: they limit normal immune response during inflammation, thus averting damage to healthy tissue.

Regulating Immune Response Is a Highly Controlled Process

Study author Thomas F. Tedder is a professor of immunology at Duke. He says in a statement that we are only just beginning to understand these recently discovered B10 cells.

He says these regulatory B cells are important because they "make sure an immune response doesn't get carried away, resulting in autoimmunity or pathology".

"This study shows for the first time that there is a highly controlled process that determines when and where these cells produce IL-10," he adds.

What they Did

For their study, Tedder and colleagues used mice to study how B10 cells produce IL-10. For IL-10 production to start, the B10 cells have to interact with T cells, which are involved in switching on the immune system.

They found B10 cells only react to certain antigens. They found that binding to these antigens makes the B10 cells turn off some of the T cells (when they come across the same antigen). This stops the immune system from harming healthy tissue.

This was a new insight into the function of B10 cells that spurred the researchers to see if they could take this further: what if it were possible to use this cellular control mechanism to regulate immune responses, particularly in respect of autoimmunity?

Replicating Large Numbers Outside the Body

B10 cells however are not common, they are extremely rare. So Tedder and colleagues had to find a way to make a ready supply of them outside the body.

They found a way to isolate the B10 cells without damaging their ability to control the immune responses. And they found a way to replicate them in large numbers, as Tedder explains:


Read More

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Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Upcoming Novartis Education Programs in Tampa and Orlando, Florida




Tuesday, October 30, 2012 4:00 pm
Roy's Restaurant
4342 W. Boy Scout Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33607

 .LIGHT FOOD AND BEVERAGES WILL BE SERVED.

Speaker: Stanley Krolczyk, DO

Please RSVP by October 29, 2012 by calling 800-973-0362


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Tuesday, November 3, 2012 11:00 am
White Wolf Cafe
1829 N. Orange Ave.
Orlando, FL 32801

 .LIGHT FOOD AND BEVERAGES WILL BE SERVED.

Speaker: Deborah Chandler, ARNP, DNP, MSCN

Please RSVP by October 29, 2012 by calling 800-973-0362


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Monday, October 22, 2012

Setting new standards in multiple sclerosis care and research


October 2012
In the run up to the 2012 European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) meeting in Lyon, France, two important new multiple sclerosis (MS) initiatives are making progress. The International Collaborative on Progressive MS published its agenda of research priorities in late August, while the European MS Platform (EMSP) is due to roll out the next stage of MS Nurse Professional (MS Nurse PRO), a programme to standardise training for MS nurses across Europe, in Barcelona, Spain, at the end of September. Despite taking very different approaches, these initiatives have the potential to benefit many of the estimated 2·5 million people worldwide who have MS.
About 10—15% of people with MS present with primary progressive disease and 80% of the rest develop secondary progressive MS within 20 years. But, despite relative success in the development of treatments for relapsing-remitting MS, the options for people with progressive MS remain limited and a breakthrough is desperately needed. The International Collaborative on Progressive MS, a group of researchers and representatives of MS patient societies from Europe and North America, has the ultimate goal of expediting the development of disease-modifying and symptomatic treatments. In its research agenda, the Collaborative outlines five priority areas for research: experimental models, identification and validation of therapeutic targets, strategies for proof-of-concept clinical trials, clinical outcome measures, and symptom management and rehabilitation. Working groups are now looking at how to overcome the barriers to progress in these areas, and a call to the wider MS research community to collaborate on ongoing and new projects to address these challenges is planned for 2013.

CONTINUE READING
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2012 - MS Symposium / MS Health Expo in Miami

                    Annual MS Symposium / MS Health Expo


        Advancements in Treatment Strategies, Symptom
        Management and Neurological Aspects of MS
   November 10th, 2012


*FREE Admission            *FREE Parking            *FREE Raffles


Location: 
 Intercontinental Hotel Doral - 2505 NW 87th Avenue, Miami,, FL 33172

  
Doors open at 8:30 a.m.     *COMPLIMENTARY Breakfast  
   
*Reservation required (see below)


Our new format ensures you won’t miss any presentations and
each time-slot allows for Q&A Sessions


10:00 a.m   Physician Panel - Bladder Issues; Psychological (Family issues) and Pain Management -  Presenters: Harvey Samowitz, MD,  Rick Harris, MD ,  Antonio Mesa, D.O.


11:45 a.m.  Neurologist Panel Neurology, Newly Diagnosed,  MRI and Research Advancements in MS Treatment
Presenters: Brian Steingo, MD,   Jeffrey Horstmyer, MD,    Melissa Ortega, MD


COMPLIMENTARY Lunch


1:00 p.m.    Your Legal Rights and Social Security Disability
Presenter:  Lisa G. Goetz, Esq. Disability Attorney


*All times are subject to change     *Rooms may be cold, please dress appropriately     

Our Educational Resource Room will provide information & hands on by specialists:  Acupuncture, Yoga, Wellness Coach/Nutritionist, Aroma Therapy, Massage, Assistive Driving Controls with Modified Vehicle, Physical Therapy/Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, Pain Management Stimulation Device, and more!


RSVP: email  info@msviewsandnews.org    


Don’t miss our biggest program of the year!

Must be at least 16 years old, this will be strongly enforced 
                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
This Educational Program is supported with Education Grants and Sponsorships from:


EMD Serono, Questcor, Genentech, Pfizer, Genzyme, Polar Products, Medtronic, Infinity Research, Teva Neuroscience, Acorda Therapeutics, Neuroscience Center of Florida, Biogen-Idec, DMR Mobility, Bioness, Cafe Ala Carte, Novartis, GigerMD and The MS Foundation 

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Clinical Trial To Test If Vitamin D Can Prevent Multiple Sclerosis

By  | Tech & Pharma
October 22, 2012

A new clinical trial set to take place in Australia and New Zealand will test whether vitamin D can prevent multiple sclerosis in those at risk of developing the disease.
AsianScientist (Oct. 22, 2012) – A new clinical trial set to take place in Australia and New Zealand will test whether vitamin D can prevent multiple sclerosis (MS) in those at risk of developing the disease.
The trial will focus on the possibility of using vitamin D supplementation to prevent a diagnosis of MS following a person’s presentation with the first symptoms that may lead to a diagnosis of MS. It will also test appropriate dosage levels and safety; information that may eventually lead to an effective prevention strategy for MS.
Tasmania, with the highest incidence of MS in Australia, will play a key role in the trial.
The PrevANZ study was launched recently in Hobart by Hon Julie Collins, the Federal Minister for Community Services, the Status of Women and Indigenous Employment and Economic Development in Australia.
“I’m very pleased to be launching this groundbreaking international clinical trial here in Tasmania,” said Minister Collins. “It is great that Tasmanian patients will not only contribute to this research, but could also be among the first to benefit from its results.”
The study is being funded by MS Research Australia (MSRA), through the support of Australian state-based MS societies, especially from Western Australia, Queensland, and Tasmania.

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Screening Tool Reveals Two Multiple Sclerosis Types


Test might someday help doctors determine who has aggressive disease earlier




By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter
(HealthDay News) -- An experimental screening technique finds that multiple sclerosis patients have two different molecular "signatures" that reflect disease severity.
This suggests that doctors might one day use this tool to help determine who has a more aggressive form of MS and might need earlier treatment with stronger medications, researchers report.
"This study shows there is evidence that we can begin to identify subsets of MS patients, and that we're moving ever-so-slowly to personalizing MS care," said study author Dr. Philip De Jager, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and an associate neurologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.
But this screening tool "is not ready for the clinic at this point. It needs to be validated in another trial," De Jager said. He envisions that this test would be one component of a number of tests doctors could use to generate risk estimates.
Results of the study are published in the Sept. 26 issue ofScience Translational Medicine.

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