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Tuesday, January 22, 2013

New co-pay program launched by EMD Serono, Inc. and Pfizer

'Stu's Views and MS News' wants to let you know about a new co-pay program launched by EMD Serono, Inc. and Pfizer. Although insurers are paying for an increasing share of prescription drug costs, patients are still paying more of these overall costs. In fact, doubling patients’ co-payments for drugs can reduce their use of medications by 25 to 45 percent. 


It is with this environment in mind that EMD Serono, Inc. and Pfizer launched today a $0 co-pay program for Rebif® (interferon beta-1a) as part of its MS LifeLines Access Made Simple program.  Any eligible person with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) starting Rebif therapy on or after January 22 will have this program available to them with no additional paperwork. People currently on Rebif therapy can call MS LifeLines at 1-877-447-3243 to determine eligibility.

MS LifeLines Access Made Simple is an access program that provides eligible patients with co-pay and free drug assistance intended to help patients with the affordability and access to Rebif.

This program is open to US residents who have a relapsing form of MS and are starting Rebif therapy or presently taking Rebif therapy. Patients covered by federal and state healthcare programs are not eligible for assistance. Eligible people taking Rebif who are currently enrolled in the MS LifeLines Access Made Simple program will be automatically enrolled in the $0 co-pay program by April 1, 2014.

EMD Serono and Pfizer are committed to helping people living with relapsing MS start and stay on Rebif as prescribed. The introduction of the $0 co-pay program signifies the companies’ commitment to the MS community and dedication to providing even more affordable access to therapy.

For more information about the MS LifeLines Access Made Simple $0 co-pay program, call 1-877-447-3243 to speak with a Reimbursement Case Specialist. You can also visit MSLifeLines.com to learn more. 


About MS LifeLines
At the heart of the MS LifeLines network is its call center, which marked a milestone in 2010 by answering one million in-bound calls from the MS community. The call center includes patient enrollment specialists, patient support specialists, nurse support specialists and reimbursement specialists. Whenever someone in the MS community needs to speak with a live person, support is available toll-free at 1-877-447-3243. The MS community can also visit MS LifeLines online at www.mslifelines.com.

About Rebif® (interferon beta-1a)
Rebif is used to treat relapsing forms of MS to decrease the frequency of relapses and delay the occurrence of some of the physical disability that is common in people with MS. Rebif is not approved for treatment of chronic progressive MS. Rebif is available in 22 mcg and 44 mcg prefilled, preassembled syringes and a titration pack.

Rebif will not cure MS but it has been shown to decrease the number of flare-ups and slow the occurrence of some of the physical disability that is common in people with MS.  Rebif can cause serious side effects, so before taking Rebif, patients should talk with their doctor about the possible benefits of Rebif and its possible side effects.

Potential serious side effects of Rebif include depression, liver problems, risk to pregnancy, allergic reactions and injection-site problems. Patients who have had an allergic reaction such as difficulty breathing, flushing or hives to another interferon beta or to human albumin should not take Rebif.

Before taking Rebif, patients should tell their doctor if they have a history of depression, anxiety, trouble sleeping, liver disease, thyroid problems, blood cell count or bleeding problems, epilepsy, or are planning to become pregnant. Patients should tell their doctor about all medicines they take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. Rebif and other medicines may affect each other causing serious side effects. Patients should talk to their doctor before taking any new medicines.

Possible side effects of Rebif include flu-like symptoms (fever, chills, sweating, muscle aches and tiredness), injection-site reactions, depression and anxiety, liver problems, abdominal pain, blood problems, thyroid problems and severe allergic reactions. Patients should let their doctor know if they have any of these symptoms or feel sad, tired, hot or cold, or experience hives, rashes, bruising, yellowing of the skin, or a change in body weight (gain or loss).

This information is not intended to replace discussions with a doctor. For additional information about Rebif, please consult the Prescribing Information and Medication Guide at www.rebif.com and talk to a doctor. Information is also available at www.mslifelines.com or call toll-free 1-877-44-REBIF (1-877-447-3243). Rebif is available by prescription only.





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