Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews -- Be empowered with MS news by registering with us: www.register.msviewsandnews.org

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

============================================================

Friday, January 18, 2013

WebMD update on CCSVI and Multiple Sclerosis


By 
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

People with a lifelong condition like multiple sclerosis (MS) are always on the lookout for a new treatment that might improve, or even cure, their disease. In the last few years, there's been a lot of buzz about a vein condition called CCSVI and its possible connection to MS.

However, this connection is very controversial. Some researchers say treating CCSVI can relieve MS symptoms. Others say CCSVI isn't even real. They compare it to the snake venom, bee stings, and other dubious "cures" that have been proposed to treat MS over the years.
So what is CCSVI? Could it be the next big breakthrough in MS research? Or is it just a false theory with a potentially dangerous treatment?

CCSVI Explained

CCSVI stands for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. It's a narrowing of veins in the neck and chest that carry blood away from the brain and spinal cord. The theory is that when blood flow is slowed, it backs up into the brain and spinal cord and leads to oxygen loss and iron deposits in the brain.
In 2009, Italian researcher Paolo Zamboni, MD, first introduced the idea that CCSVI might cause MS, or make its symptoms worse. When he used ultrasound to compare the blood vessels of people with and without MS, he found abnormal blood flow in 100% of the people with MS, but in 0% of people without MS.

Does CCSVI Really Exist?

Zamboni's findings sound impressive. But when other researchers have tried to copy his research, they haven't gotten the same results.
  • Some studies have found that CCSVI is more common in people with MS than in healthy people -- but not nearly as common as Zamboni found.
  • Other studies have reported CCSVI in almost exactly the same number of healthy people as in people with MS.
  • Some researchers have also found CCSVI in people with other nervous system conditions.
These differences in results raise questions about whether CCSVI is a real condition and how it relates to MS. "When something is true, it is replicated. This is how science works," says David A. Hafler, MD, chairman of the Yale School of Medicine department of neurology.
Why have researchers gotten such different results? One reason is that research teams use different criteria to evaluate CCSVI.
"The way the ultrasound is conducted is not yet standardized," says Robert Fox, MD, staff neurologist and medical director at the Cleveland Clinic Mellen Center for MS. "It's not like getting a blood count." He found that when people were examined with different types of scans, the number of CCSVI cases changed.
The difference in results could also have to do with something as basic as how much water study participants had to drink before their scans. "If you don't have a lot of volume in the veins they're going to collapse down," Fox says. When he had study participants drink Gatorade before their ultrasound, many of them no longer had signs of CCSVI. "Once you fill up the veins, you have much more blood flowing through them, and they're much more plump."


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Bilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia in Multiple Sclerosis


Getaw Worku Hassen, M.D., Ph.D., and Namita Bhardwaj, M.D.
N Engl J Med 2013; 368:e3January 17, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMicm1200499

A 45-year-old man with multiple sclerosis presented with worsening weakness in his right leg and double vision. Neurologic examination revealed horizontal diplopia during lateral gaze in both eyes. The patient had an adduction deficit in the right eye and nystagmus in the left eye on leftward gaze (Panel A). He also had an adduction deficit in the left eye and nystagmus in the right eye on rightward gaze (Panel B). Upward gaze (Panel C), downward gaze (Panel D), and normal primary position (Panel E) were unremarkable (video). Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is characterized by impaired horizontal eye movement that is caused by a lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus, a fiber tract that rises from the abducens nucleus in the pons to the contralateral oculomotor nucleus in the midbrain. Lesions in the medial longitudinal fasciculus result in the failure of adduction on attempted lateral gaze. Any brain-stem syndrome can interrupt the medial longitudinal fasciculus and result in impaired horizontal eye movement, but the most frequent underlying cause is multiple sclerosis. This patient had internuclear ophthalmoplegia in both eyes due to demyelinating lesions. Glucocorticoids were administered intravenously, but the deficits did not resolve. On follow-up at 2 months, the patient's gait had improved, but the internuclear ophthalmoplegia remained.
See Images - click here

..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Novel Cancer Hypothesis Suggests Antioxidants Are Harmful


Zosia Chustecka
Jan 11, 2013
A new hypothesis that focuses on reactive oxygen species (ROS) proposes that antioxidant levels within cancer cells are a problem and are responsible for resistance to treatment.
The theory destroys any reason for taking antioxidative nutritional supplements, because they "more likely cause than prevent cancer," according to Nobel laureate James Watson, PhD, from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York.
Dr. Watson, who shared the Nobel prize for unraveling the structure of DNA, regards this theory as being "among my most important work since the double helix," notes a press release from his institution, where he has been director since 1968.
The theory was published online January 8 in Open Biology.
Dr. Watson explains that the vast majority of agents used to directly kill cancer cells, including ionizing radiation, most chemotherapeutic agents, and some targeted therapies, work by generating — either directly or indirectly — ROS that block key steps in the cell cycle.
This generation of ROS creates a hypoxic environment in which cancers cells undergo a transformation from epithelial to mesenchymal cells (EMT).
These transformed cells almost inevitably posses very high amounts of antioxidants, which effectively block the effects of anticancer treatments, Dr. Watson notes. Once a cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, it usually is equally resistant to ionizing radiation, he points out.
In addition, these transformed EMT cancer cells generate free-floating mesenchymal cells, which have the flexibility and movement that allows them to metastasize to other body locations (brain, liver, lung). "Only when they have moved do most cancers become life-threatening," Dr. Watson notes.
Interestingly, the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin has been shown to preferentially kill mesenchymal stem cells. "In a still much unappreciated article published 3 years ago," metformin added to chemotherapy "induced prolonged remission if not real cures" in mouse models of cancer (Cancer Res. 2009;69:7507-7511), Dr. Watson writes. He notes that clinical trials are currently looking to see if adding metformin to chemotherapy provides clinical benefits, but adds that diabetics who have been using metformin regularly have a reduced incidence of many cancers.
..


.
.

Thursday, January 17, 2013

New test could boost Tysabri sales


By Thomas Molloy
Thursday January 17 2013


ELAN is looking for approval to sell the drug Tysabri to more multiple sclerosis sufferers.
The move could boost sales of the drug, which is a highly effective treatment for some of those who have one of the commonest medical problems in the western world.
Demand for Tysabri has been muted because it can trigger a potentially fatal viral infection known as progressive multi-focal leukoencephalopathy, or PML, in some patients.
Dublin-based Elan and US partner Biogen now say that more people can use the drug thanks to a new test for the virus, which can predict whether patients are at risk of developing PML.
Elan and Biogen said yesterday that they had submitted applications to the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency seeking approval for a new label which allows Tysabri to be used by patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis who have tested negative for antibodies to the virus which triggers problems for Tysabri users.
Davy Stockbrokers analyst Jack Gorman welcomed the move. "Elan and BIIB have been building a significant body of evidence in recent years to establish the major risk factors," he said.
"Formalising a label update is a natural next step in these initiatives and would be supportive of our thesis that further strong patient growth can be achieved for Tysabri in the coming years."
Davy said it expected more than 92,000 patients to use Tysabri within three years or more than 30pc more than current levels.

..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Symptoms of MS


In multiple sclerosis, damage to the Myelin in the central nervous system (CNS), and to the nerve fibers themselves, interferes with the transmission of nerve signals between the brain and spinal cord and other parts of the body. This disruption of nerve signals produces the primary symptoms of MS, which vary depending on where the damage has occurred.
Over the course of the disease, some symptoms will come and go, while others may be more lasting.

Symptoms

Most Common Symptoms
Some symptoms of MS are much more common than others.

Fatigue

Numbness

Walking (Gait), Balance, & Coordination Problems

Bladder Dysfunction

Bowel Dysfunction

Vision Problems

Dizziness and Vertigo

Sexual Dysfunction

Pain

Cognitive Dysfunction

Emotional Changes

Depression

Spasticity

Less Common Symptoms
These symptoms also occur in MS, but much less frequently.

Speech Disorders

Swallowing Problems

Headache

Hearing Loss

Seizures

Tremor

Respiration / Breathing Problems

Itching



SOURCE: National MS Society
..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Pfizer-EMD auto-injector device for multiple sclerosis patients approved by FDA

Ursula Zerilli | uzerilli@mlive.comBy Ursula Zerilli | uzerilli@mlive.com 
on January 14, 2013 at 4:30 PM




“We are pleased to announce the FDA has approved Rebif Rebidose which provides people living with relapsing MS another option to meet their injection needs," said James Hoyes , president of EMD Serono, Inc.

With this approval, all three delivery options of Rebif, which comes in prefilled syringes, Rebiject II and now Rebif Rebidose, will be available in the U.S. for patients treating their relapsing forms of MS.

The pharmaceutical companies say the auto-injector device is designed to assist with ease of use as an alternative delivery option. Rebif Rebidose will be available in a monthly pack in doses of 22 micrograms and 44 micrograms and in a titration pack.

The treatment device was evaluated in a 12-week, single-arm study for the self-administration of Rebif with respect to ease of use in 109 patients with relapsing MS, who were receiving Rebif 44 microgram three times weekly for more than 12 weeks, continued MS therapy using Rebif Rebidose for 12 weeks. The results of the Rebif Rebidose user trial showed that the majority of patients found the device easy to use.

Rebif Rebidose will be available in the U.S. in early 2013. Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer Inc. is also one of Kalamazoo's largest employers.

Contact Ursula Zerilli at uzerilli@mlive.com or 269-254-5295. .


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Neuroscientists show how decision-making processes are influenced by neurons

January 15, 2013


Whether in society or nature, decisions are often the result of complex interactions between many factors. Because of this it is usually difficult to determine how much weight the different factors have in making a final decision. Neuroscientists face a similar problem since decisions made by the brain always involve many neurons. Working in collaboration, the University of Tübingen and the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, supported within the framework of the Bernstein Network, researchers lead by CIN professor Matthias Bethge have now shown how the weight of individual neurons in the decision-making process can be reconstructed despite interdependencies between the neurons.

When we see a person on the other side of the street who looks like an old friend, the informational input enters the brain via many sensory neurons. But which of these neurons are crucial in passing on the relevant information to higher brain areas, which will decide who the person is and whether to wave and say 'hello'? A research group lead by Matthias Bethge has now developed an equation that allows them to calculate to what degree a given individual sensory neuron is involved in the decision process. 

To approach this question, researchers have so far considered the information about the final decision that an individual sensory neuron carries. Just as an individual is considered suspicious if he or she is found to have insider information about a crime, those sensory neurons whose activity contains information about the eventual decision are presumed to have played a role in reaching the final decision. The problem with this approach is that neurons – much like people – are constantly communicating with each other. A neuron which itself is not involved in the decision may simply have received this information from a neighboring neuron and "joined in" the conversation. Actually, the neighboring cell sends out the crucial signal transmitted to the higher decision areas in the brain.

The new formula that has been developed by scientists addresses this by accounting not just for the information in the activity of any one neuron but also for the communication that takes place between them. This formula will now be used to determine whether only a few neurons that carry a lot of information are involved in the brain's decision process, or whether the information contained in very many neurons gets combined. In particular, it will be possible to address the more fundamental question: In which decisions does the brain use information in an optimal way, and for which decisions is its processing suboptimal?

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-neuroscientists-decision-making-neurons.html#jCp




If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

New research network for multiple sclerosis research

January 14, 2013


To date, Multiple Sclerosis (MS) has been considered to be an incurable disease involving the immune system and its exact causes are still unknown. Why exactly is there inadequate communication between the various kinds of immune cells in patients with the autoimmune disease MS? Why are the brains of MS patients the targets of "accidental" attacks by their own immune system? It is hoped that the research network ITN-NeuroKine, currently in the process of being formed under the aegis of the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) with the help of EUR 3.5 million in funding provided by the European Commission, will provide answers to these questions. ITN stands for Initial Training Network, a concept established as one of the Marie Curie Actions and designed to promote European networks for the structured training of young researchers. 'NeuroKine' is an acronym for 'Neurological disorders orchestrated by cytoKines'. The ITN NeuroKine network was launched on January 1, 2013.
"The core objective of our new ITN-NeuroKine research network is to gain insight into the impairment of communication between immune cells," explained Professor Dr. Ari Waisman, Director of the Institute of Molecular Medicine (IMM) at the Mainz University Medical Center. "We will specifically be focusing on the soluble proteins called cytokines, which regulate the communication between these cells." Immune cells are mobile and are present at various sites in the body.
The ITN-NeuroKine research network is composed of an international team of researchers with a broad range of expertise in the areas of molecular and cellular neuroimmunology and neuropathology. The participants are scientists from the University of Zürich (UZH), the Medical University of Vienna (MUW), the Parisian Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), the Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele (USR) in Milan, the Weizmann Institute of Science (WIS) based in Rehovot, Israel, the Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam (EMC), and the Charité University Hospital in Berlin together with various commercial medical organizations, such as Miltenyi Biotech GmbH, Apitope Technology Ltd., Phenex Pharmaceuticals AG, and the Mainz-based BioNTech AG. Also participating are the Postdoc Career Development Initiative (PCDI) in Utrecht, the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Basel, and GlaxoSmithKline.
"The creation of the ITN-NeuroKine research network is crucial to the reputation of Mainz as a science hub. On the one hand, the ITN-NeuroKine network will be conducting cutting-edge research into the area where brain and immune system interact. At the same time, this network will be providing young researchers with the opportunity to receive specialized training," emphasized Professor Dr. Dr. Reinhard Urban, Chief Scientific Officer of the Mainz University Medical Center.
Provided by Universitaet Mainz
This PHYSorg Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Multiple sclerosis and the flu is no joke




Once again we are in the midst of the flu season and according to reports, it is already starting off with a bang with an Ohio death being reported. Having that kind of news thrown at you, and you are someone with multiple sclerosis (MS), you are going to sit up and pay attention.
Michael Pinna of Lima, Ca. already went to one of the Walgreens in town saying, “I called them first because my wife had texted me that she’d heard news there were shortages. She didn’t want me to waste my time going after work if they weren’t going to have it.”
We are assured there aren’t shortages of the vaccine, but the demand has caused disruptions all across the States. It is suggested to call ahead to make sure, wherever we go, the vaccine is available at that time.
A quick call to a nearby  Walgreens found only one of the stores having them in stock at this time.  with the others in town waiting for their orders to come in and the Rite-Aid . also had it, but calls should be made to the other pharmacies before going in.

Visit the Walgreens and Rite-Aid pages if living outside Lima, California to get store locations and information on the vaccines.
There are two different ways to receive the vaccine, injected or by nasal spray, but for those with MS, the live-virus FluMist® nasal spray is not recommended. Injectable flu vaccines are an inactivated vaccine, meaning the virus is grown in a culture and then destroyed. They can’t replicate whereas the reduced biological activity of the nasal spray shows a weakened disease state but it’s not completely inactivated.
The National MS Society has a page addressing that issue along with other pertinent vaccination information. They tell us how MS patients “who are experiencing a serious relapse that affects their ability to carry out activities of daily living should defer vaccination until 4-6 weeks after the onset of the relapse".
According to the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) map, Ohio is showing an extremely high level of flu activity and there have also been reports that hospitals here in Ohio have been asking people to wear masks to “protect those who are not infected”.
Please visit The National MS Society link shown above and the CDC’s ‘Preventing the Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs’ article for more information.


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Monday, January 14, 2013

Buffalo study offers hope to multiple sclerosis patients

BY:  



..

 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register


.
.

Sunday, January 13, 2013

Living with Multiple Sclerosis: Hope for Stem Cell Therapies

January 2013

re: a Stem Cell Therapy  


Watch and Listen to this report 
of Nan Luke - an MS patient Advocate

Click here
..




If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

FUN Sitting Exercise for Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

The MS Trust's Move It For MS exercise DVD, features Mr Motivator and aims to make exercise fun and engaging, to enable people with multiple sclerosis to work through beneficial routines in their own 





Tell us what you think of this video. Leave comment please
..



 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
..
.

Multiple Sclerosis and Employment Research Survey


This research is being conducted by University of Massachusetts - Lowell.

You are being asked to participate in a research survey given to adult multiple sclerosis patients. The purpose of this survey is to assess the strategies used by multiple sclerosis patients to remain employed.

Procedure and Duration: Before starting this survey, please read this Informed Consent form. By continuing to the next page, you are consenting that you understand your rights as a participant in this study. This survey should take between 5 and 10 minutes.


Please click the link below to help this research study.




..



 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

MS news from The Examiner from a guy Named Mike




..

Dr. Phil on Multiple Sclerosis

Watch this show to hear from the caregiver and from the patient

Hear of the Fatigue and the Friction within the marriage, and the concerns.





Then after his introduction to Nancy Davis, watch Her video of "Lean on Me" - found here:






Please leave your comments for this Blog Posting here under the link of comments


..



 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register

.