Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

=================

CHAMPIONS TACKLING MS - AWARDS Dinner, Honoring Aaron Boster, MD and Jon e. Glaser, DDS - now open for registration. Visit www.events.msvn.org

Friday, February 1, 2013

The Protein Klotho Paves The Way For Future Multiple Sclerosis Drugs

January 31, 2013
A team of researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have identified a new drug target for Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. They discovered the importance of a protein called Klotho which helps maintain healthy myelin - an insulating material allowing communication between nerve cells.

As people begin to age the levels of Klotho in the brain also begin to decrease. They published their findings online in Journal of Neuroscience.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a condition in which the myelin inside the brain and spinal cord becomes damaged, causing demyelination. This can cause the nerve cells in the brain to communicate inefficiently; this can lead to serious physical and cognitive disability.

Signs and symptoms of MS usually begin to appear in young adults; it is more prevalent among women. 

The earliest signs of MS begin when the immune system attacks the protective myelin. The researchers found that the Klotho protein is able to produce the necessary proteins vital for the production and maintenance of a healthy myelin, which could reverse the damage caused by MS

In an abstract in the journal authors said:

"Predominantly generated in brain and kidney, Klotho overexpression extends life span, whereas loss of Klotho accelerates the development of aging-like phenotypes. Although the function of Klotho in brain is unknown, loss of Klotho expression leads to cognitive deficits.

We found significant effects of Klotho on oligodendrocyte functions, including induced maturation of rat primary oligodendrocytic progenitor cells (OPCs) in vitro and myelination."


Lead author, Carmela Abraham, PhD, added: "These results taken together indicate that Klotho could become a drug target for multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases, including AD." 


CONTINUE READING
..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Groundwork Begun on Key Stem Cell Study


Jan 2013

Scientists in recent years have found a way to infuse stem cells into the brains of animals to repair damage to the central nervous system, offering some of the most encouraging news yet for people with MS.

A $12.1 million study soon will be under way in Buffalo and two other upstate medical centers that will for the first time begin to test the procedure in people.

The hope is that the stem cells will generate new Myelin, the fatty substance that surrounds nerves like the insulation on a wire. Myelin is damaged in MS, leading to weak or lost signals between nerves.


The upstate consortium study for MS, which is funded by the Empire State Stem Cell Board, is the first step in a typical research process, which occurs in phases and usually takes many years to complete.

In the first two phases, scientists test the safety and effectiveness of an experimental treatment, and that’s what will happen with this stem cell trial for MS. People enrolled in the study will be those with secondary progressive MS. Small holes will be drilled into their skulls and stem cells injected through catheters inserted in the holes.

The current plan, dependent on government approval, is to start with stem cells from the patient’s own skin cells and reprogram them into cells useful for making myelin.

Before the first patients can receive the treatment in 2016, researchers must spend the next few years preparing for the trial. Among other things, they need to refine how they will measure the repair of myelin, as well as improvements in the patients. Improvements are likely to occur slowly and will vary from person to person, researchers said.


Although stem cells show great promise, the approach is a ways from becoming reality. What works in mice does not always work in humans. In addition, scientists don’t know what causes MS, so they can’t exactly replicate MS in animals, complicating tests of the potential new treatment.

“Expectations have to be kept under control. You’re not going to implant stem cells in people and suddenly see them running around,” said Dr. Bianca Guttman-Weinstock, co-principal investigator at the University of Buffalo.


Information provided by the MS Foundation


..


.

MARCH 2013 - IS MS Awareness Month



We are geared up and ready to accelerate MS awareness for the upcoming 2013 National Multiple Sclerosis Education and Awareness Month® (NMSEAM). NMSEAM is an effort by the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation to raise the public's awareness of multiple sclerosis. The vital goals of this campaign, which happens annually in March, are to promote an understanding of the scope of this disease, and to assist those with MS in making educated decisions about their healthcare.


MSF's 2013 theme is:  When MS Gets You Down, Don’t Give Up:      A.D.A.P.T.  Assess, Decide, Adjust, Prepare, and Try 

New teleconferences, video presentations, educational programs, and fact sheets have been developed to provide information on how to incorporate this strategy into your life, and how to adapt to some of the specific changes that MS is likely to bring.
Many caring friends of the MSF have gotten involved in NMSEAM by hosting special events designed to raise MS awareness and/or raise funds. Benefits of these events are substantial – not only to the MSF but to the organizers, too. Participants develop camaraderie and make new friends. Find spirit and satisfaction having fun and helping such an important cause!

An essential tool to your NMSEAM outreach is the Awareness Kit, which features informative fact sheets related to the theme as well as fun and useful items. Also available are kits containing general information about MS, perfect for giving to others who want to learn more about the disease and how they might help.

Another great way to get involved is by participating in our initiative. How have you successfully adapted to some aspect of living with MS? Share your story! Connecting with others and inspiring others can be an uplifting part of the NMSEAM experience. Grand prize winner of the initiative will win a tablet computer! To learn more visit our website at www.msfocus.org and find an application in the winter 2013 issue of the MSFocus magazine.

Applications can also be found in this year’s NMSEAM kits. You can order your kit by calling 888-673-6287 or email awareness@msfocus.org

..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

MS Foundation's Cooling Program Ready to Start


Cooling Program Ready to Start

The MSF Cooling Program’s 2013 cycle kicks off on February 1, helping those with MS to handle a troubling symptom of their disease: heat intolerance. This program provides cooling vests and cooling accessories to qualified applicants. Applicants must be residents of the United States and document their diagnosis of MS. All applications are confidential and considered on a case-by-case basis. To apply, those in need can call 1-888-MSFOCUS (1-888-673-6287) or visit http://www.msfocus.org and click on Programs & Activities. Applications are accepted from Feb. 1 to June 1 of each year. Limited funding is available so individuals in need are encouraged to apply early.


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, is a website to watch


Information provided from the MSF


Website to Watch
The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is the federal government’s lead agency for scientific research on the diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not generally considered part of conventional medicine. The mission of NCCAM has been to support research on complementary and alternative medicine and to disseminate information to the public and professionals about which CAM interventions are effective, which are not, and why.

The most current information is available on the NCCAM website at http://nccam.nih.gov/. In addition to reports on a range of topics, the website provides a link to the organization’s blog as well as other helpful advice, such as how to find a CAM practitioner.

..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Bladder Control Drug now Available Without Prescription


Bladder Control Drug now Available Without Prescription


Info provided from the MS Foundation


A patch containing oxybutynin (Oxytrol®) for controlling overactive bladder may now be sold over-the-counter (OCT) for women 18 and older, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The medication is one that has been prescribed for over-active bladder due to MS. Men will continue to need a prescription for the drug, the agency said.

Ben Thrower, M.D., senior medical advisor for the MSF, advises:  “Women in this situation should still discuss their bladder symptoms with their MS healthcare provider. Medications like Oxytrol need to be used with appropriate guidance.”
The OTC product will be marketed by Merck as Oxytrol for Women.

Oxybutynin is an anticholinergic agent that acts as a bladder muscle relaxant. No agent in this class has been available over-the-counter before, according to the FDA.

The approval comes despite an agency advisory panel's narrow vote against the OTC switch in November. Panel members expressed concerns about inappropriate use of the drug without a physician's oversight or diagnosis of overactive bladder. Approval of the OTC formulation was supported by nine studies in more than 5,000 participants.

"Overall, results from these studies showed that consumers can understand the information on the label, properly select whether the product is right for them, and use the drug appropriately," the FDA said.

Adverse effects seen in these studies included mild skin irritation at the patch site, dry mouth, and constipation. Merck's studies also found that men were relatively poor at correctly determining whether oxybutynin was the appropriate treatment for their urination problems. A key worry is that incorrect self-diagnosis in men could delay detection of prostate cancer. Consequently, the company did not seek OTC status for the product in men.

..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

ZERO Co-PAY for Rebif® therapy


Any eligible person with relapsing MS who is on Rebif® therapy may qualify for a $0 co-pay program available through the MS LifeLines® Access Made Simple program, according to EMD Serono, Inc. and Pfizer. Those currently on Rebif therapy can call MS LifeLines at 1-877-447-3243 to determine eligibility. Eligible people taking Rebif who are currently enrolled in the MS LifeLines Access Made Simple program will be automatically enrolled in the $0 co-pay program by April 1, 2014. Those starting Rebif therapy on or after January 22 will have this program available to them with no additional paperwork.

MS LifeLines Access Made Simple is an access program that provides eligible patients with co-pay and free drug assistance intended to help patients with the affordability and access to Rebif. Unlike other programs, MS LifeLines Access Made Simple provides benefits regardless of insurance or income, and there is no limit on co-pay assistance. This program is open to U.S. residents who have a relapsing form of MS and are starting Rebif therapy or presently taking Rebif therapy. Patients covered by federal and state healthcare programs are not eligible for assistance.
For more information about the MS LifeLines Access Made Simple $0 co-pay program, visit http://www.MSLifeLines.com


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Survey: Caregivers of Spouses/Partners with MS Study


Researchers at the University at Albany, SUNY are recruiting anyone who is the spouse/romantic partner of someone with MS to learn more about these special caregivers. Spouses/partners of someone with MS who provide any care, and can take a brief, anonymous survey are eligible. The survey will take about 40 minutes to complete. Participants can enter to win a prize.

Click here to take the survey online. 

Call 518-442-4684 or e-mail arivers@albany.edu with any questions or to take the survey over the telephone.


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Investigators Recruiting for Personalized T Cell Immunotherapy Study in Secondary-Progressive MS -


This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified November 2012 by Opexa Therapeutics, Inc.

Study Purpose:
The purpose of this study is to determine whether Tcelna (imilecleucel-T, autologous T-Cell Immunotherapy) is effective in the treatment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS).



Find out if there is a recruiting in/around your state looking for your participation:


..


.

BG-12 (Biogen's Oral) NOW has a Name: TECFIDERA


Tecfidera (BG-12) awaits FDA decision


..
January 31, 2013

Tecfidera (BG-12) is pending FDA decision on March 27, 2013. This oral twice daily treatment for multiple sclerosis has been demonstrated to drop relapses by 53% in the DEFINE trial. In addition, Tecfidera reduced the likelihood of disability worsening by 38% compared to placebo. The impact was robust on MRI with 90% less new contrast activity. New or enlarging T2 areas on MRI were reduced by 85%. Common side effects include flushing, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea which generally improve after one month. High blood liver tests and low white blood counts were also noted in the trial.

In the CONFIRM Trial, the twice a day dose of Tecfidera lowered relapses by 44% compared to placebo. In a comparison group of patients in the trial, Copaxone reduced relapses by 29%. Tecfidera is an oral formulation of dimethyl fumurate, which has been demonstrated to reduce inflammation and protect cells in experimental research. Dimethyl fumarate is a component of the drug Fumaderm, used to treat psoriasis in Germany.

Learn more about MS treatments.






If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Injectable Drug Demonstrates Efficacy with Reduced Dosing Schedule


An injectable treatment for relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) designed to significantly reduce the dosing schedule typical of standard interferon drugs has shown favorable results in a late-stage clinical trial, according to drug manufacturer Biogen Idec.

The phase III ADVANCE study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of peginterferon beta-1a (also known as Peg-Avonex) compared to placebo at one year. More than 1,500 people with RRMS participated in the study and were divided into arms of dosing every two weeks or dosing every four weeks. Results showed that Peginterferon beta-1a:

Reduced the risk of 12-week confirmed disability progression as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) by 38 percent in both dosing arms.

Reduced the proportion of patients who relapsed by 39 percent in the once every two-week dosing arm and by 26 percent in the once every four-week dosing arm.

Reduced the number of new or newly enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions on brain MRI scans by 67 percent in the once every two-week dosing arm and by 28 percent in the once every four-week dosing arm.

Adverse events (AEs), serious adverse events (SAEs) and discontinuations due to AEs were similar across both dose groups in ADVANCE and both dosing regimens showed favorable safety and tolerability profiles. The overall incidence of SAEs and AEs was similar among the peginterferon beta-1a and placebo groups. The most common SAE was infections, which was balanced across all treatment groups. The most commonly reported AEs with peginterferon beta-1a treatment were redness at the injection site and influenza-like illness.
Biogen said the results "support peginterferon beta-1a as a potential treatment dosed every two weeks or every four weeks for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis."

Biogen said it plans to submit the drug for approval in 2013.


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Testosterone and its derivatives could constitute an efficient treatment against myelin diseases such as multiple sclerosis


Androgenic hormones could help treat multiple sclerosis




Paris- Testosterone and its derivatives could constitute an efficient treatment against myelin diseases such as multiple sclerosis, reveals a study by researchers from the Laboratoire d'Imagerie et de Neurosciences Cognitives (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg), in collaboration in particular with the “Neuroprotection et Neurorégénération: Molécules Neuroactives de Petite Taille” unit (Inserm/Université Paris-Sud).

Myelin composes the sheaths that protect the nerve fibers and allow the speed of nerve impulses to be increased. A deficit in the production of myelin or its destruction cause serious illnesses for which there is no curative treatment. The researchers have shown that in mice brains whose nerve fibers have been demyelinated, testosterone and a synthetic analog induce the regeneration of oligodendrocytes, the cells responsible for myelination, and that they stimulate remyelination. This work is published on January in the journal Brain.



..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Do you take LDN or have taken LDN and want to share your story?



PO Box 1083, Buxton Norwich NR10 5WY
Telephone: 0844 41 45 295
Contact: Linda Elesgood


Do you take LDN or have taken LDN and want to share your story?
If so The LDN Trust really needs your help!


We would really appreciate your help and support by being interviewed, this can be carried out either via a landline telephone, Skype or you can write your story which I can have it read for you. You can use your first name or a nickname. The interviews are made into video’s and added to the LDN Research Trust channel, we now have over 300 which can be found from this Link Some people wanted to have their own photographs on the videos but we can use Library photographs.

Please email   so we can arrange a suitable time and date regardless where in the world you live or what condition LDN is or was taken for.

Please get involved we really do need your help and support to get the word out!

LDN VOICES - Listening to the Patient
Interview questions for LDN Users.
1.    Name (first name or nick name), Country and Condition
2.    When were you diagnosed?
3.    How old were you?
4.    What was your life like before diagnosis?
5.    What impact did being diagnosed make to you and your family?
6.    What where your symptoms at that time?
7.    How did you learn about LDN? 
8.    Did you have any problems obtaining a prescription of LDN?
9.    Did you have any problems filling your prescription?
10. How long have you been taking LDN?
11. How has LDN helped with this health condition?
12. What are you symptoms now?
13. Have you experienced any negative side-effects from taking LDN?
14. What is your life like since starting LDN?
15. Will you continue to take LDN?
16. What would you like to say to other people with your condition who are thinking of trying LDN?


If you have already told your story and would like to do an update, we can do that.

I look forward to hearing from you soon

Best Regards

Linda Elsegood

Patron: Jackie Young - Bihari

Registered Charity No 1106636
Trustees: Mrs Linda Elsegood, Mr Alex Parker, Mr Neil Lucas, Dr Dawn Shepherd, Mr Lee Reynolds
Medical Advisors: Dr Bob Lawrence MRCS, LRCP. Dr Tom Gilhooly MBChB, MRCGP, Stephen Dickson BSC (hons) MRPharmS




..



.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Quantitative MRIs evade multiple sclerosis clinicoradiologic paradox

January 28, 2013

By Peter Sergo, medwireNews Reporter

Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect microstructural changes in the spinal cords of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) that correlate with observed differences in clinical disability, according to a cross-sectional study in Neurology.

The identification of clinically relevant differences surpassed those that conventional MRI was able to detect, which were unable to explain the disconnect between spinal cord lesions and corresponding physical disability often observed in MS: the clinicoradiologic paradox.

"These findings support the concept that microstructural changes… contribute substantially to clinical disability in MS, and suggest that quantitative MRI measures have the ability to provide clinically relevant information beyond that which may be gleaned from measures of MRI lesion load alone," authors Jiwon Oh (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA) and colleagues write.

A total of 124 patients underwent 3-T cervical spinal cord MRI and were grouped based on having two or fewer spinal lesions ("low-lesion" group) or three or more spinal lesions ("high lesions" group). The two groups were subsequently classified further based on a "low" versus "high" disability level.

The four subgroups underwent various, complementary quantitative MRI sequences that focused between the C3 and C4 vertebra of the spinal cord (axial cross-section) and provided numerous indices: fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, perpendicular diffusivity, parallel diffusivity, and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR).

With the exception of parallel diffusivity and MTR, the high-disability subgroups in both the low and high lesion count groups generally had a higher degree of abnormality in their MRI measures than the low-disability subgroups, enabling discrimination even after age and gender were controlled for.

The low lesion group showed a significant difference in MTR between the disability subgroups, which was not observed in the high lesion group. The authors explain that this measurement of myelin content may be less relevant to clinical disability in patients who have more spinal cord lesions due to axonal degeneration taking a larger toll or, alternatively, demyelination being too extensive.

The authors also suggest that the disability observed in patients with a high lesion load is related to the structural integrity of the tissue that remains rather than the magnitude of tissue loss, which underscores the importance of quantitative MRI indices.

"If confirmed prospectively, these techniques have the clinical utility in a variety of realms, including monitoring therapeutic efficacy, predicting disability progression, and as a surrogate outcome measure in clinical trials," Oh et al observe. "The need for predictive measures of disease progression is apparent as clinical practice of MS continues to evolve."



..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Monday, January 28, 2013

Biogen says MS drug reduces relapse rates in study


Biogen says potential multiple sclerosis treatment reduces relapse rates in late-stage study

Associated Press – Fri, Jan 25, 2013

WESTON, Mass. (AP) -- Biogen Idec said a potential multiple sclerosis treatment designed to last longer between injections fared well in late-stage research, and the drug developer plans to submit it to U.S. and European regulators for possible approval this year.
The Weston, Mass., company said it tested doses of the drug, labeled peginterferon beta-1a, delivered at two-week or four-week intervals in patients with a form of multiple sclerosis that cycles between stages of relapse and remission.
A total of 35.6 percent of the patients who had injections every two weeks saw a significant reduction in annual relapse rates, while 27.5 percent of patients taking the treatment every four weeks saw significant reductions.
A company spokeswoman said the potential drug's effectiveness was comparable to current treatments that require patients to take daily doses or injections several times a week.
More than 1,500 patients were involved in the trial. Biogen will present study data in March at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting.
Source found here


..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Genzyme: FDA will review Lemtrada, its drug candidate for relapsing MS


Genzyme, now a Cambridge-based unit of French drug giant Sanofi SA., said Monday that the US Food and Drug Administration will review its application for Lemtrada, its drug candidate for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis, or RMS.

Sanofi bought Genzyme for $20.1 billion in 2010.

Under its new corporate parent, Genzyme, long known as a maker of treatments for rare diseases, has mounted an effort to enter the lucrative, and broader, market for multiple sclerosis drugs, which is estimated at about $13 billion a year worldwide, it was noted in a recent Globe story that referenced Lemtrada.

Lemtrada is aimed at patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; it is administered intravenously once a year for five days the first year of use, and for three days the next year.


In a press release, , Genzyme said it expects FDA action on the application in the second half of 2013.

Genzyme said it has already submitted its marketing authorization application for Lemtrada to European regulators, and the review process there is underway.

Last August, Genzyme suffered a setback when the FDA asked it to change the way it presents clinical data and resubmit an application it filed in June for approval of Lemtrada.

..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.

Sanofi Moves Closer to Multiple Sclerosis Drug Approval


Sanofi (NYSE: SNY  announced today that the Food and Drug Administration accepted its supplemental Biologics License Application requesting permission to market Lemtrada for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis.
The active ingredient in Lemtrada was originally approved as Campath to treat leukemia, but Sanofi pulled Campath off the market, with some speculating that this was because the difference between the leukemia dose and the multiple sclerosis dose would have made the drug extremely cheap for the multiple sclerosis patients.
The marketing application is based on two phase 3 studies comparing Lemtrada to Pfizer(NYSE: PFE  ) and Merck KGaA's Rebif. One study compared the drugs in patients new to treatment while the other tested patients who had relapsed while on a prior therapy.
Sanofi expects a decision from the FDA in the second half of the year. A decision from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use in the EU is expected in the second quarter

read more
..


If you would like, you can comment to our blog posts
 LIKE this Blog by clicking the LIKE button - top left
 REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
.