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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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Thursday, May 23, 2013

MS Health University provides free MS health training classes for MS Patients


MS Health University provides free MS health training classes for MS recoverers.

MS Health University helps MS patients with their symptoms and it is run 
by Dr. Rudy Cartwright, the MS Health Coach, and his son Scott Cartwright, who has Master's Degree in Public Health. 

Dr. Cartwright does all of the MS research for you and then presents it to you in an easy-to-understand format without a lot of "doctor talk."  Dr. Cartwright regularly does health coaching and Question & Answer calls with students which allows you to get all your burning questions answered.  Dr. Cartwright takes all the time you need to explain things to you and when you are finished, you know exactly what is going on and what you should be doing moving forward. 

Dr. Cartwright has also created the MS "Freedom Protocol" which discusses the foods you need to be eating, the toxins you need to be avoiding, the viruses you need to be concerned about, the supplements you should be taking, the effects of music, exercise, and yoga - and how all these things will help you get rid of your fatigue, stop your pain, tingling, and numbness, clear up your balance, vision, and bowel problems...and get back to doing all the 
things you used to love doing! 

To get instant access to your free MS Health Coaching Classes, click here:
https://m396.infusionsoft.com/go/msvn2/msvn2/ 


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Wednesday, May 22, 2013

An Interview with Brian Steingo, MD of Neurology -- on Adherence, Compliance and Symptom Management in Multiple Sclerosis


An interview Brian Steingo, MD of Neurology on StuMSRadio - BLOGTALK


To listen to this program, click here



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INFORMATION and Types of Pain in MS


Pain syndromes are common in MS. In one study, 55% of people with MS had “clinically significant pain” at some time. Almost half (48%) were troubled by chronic pain. This study suggested that factors such as age at onset, length of time with MS, or degree of disability played no part in distinguishing the people with pain from the people who were pain free. The study also indicated that twice as many women as men experienced pain as part of their MS.

Several Sources and Types of Pain in MS 

Acute Pain

Trigeminal neuralgia is a stabbing pain in the face. It can occur as an initial symptom of MS. While it can be confused with dental pain, this pain is neuropathic (caused by damage to the trigeminal nerve) in origin. It can usually be treated with medications such as the anticonvulsants carbamazepine (Tegretol®) or phenytoin(Dilantin®).
Lhermitte’s sign is a brief, stabbing, electric-shock-like sensation that runs from the back of the head down the spine, brought on by bending the neck forward. Medications, including anticonvulsants, may be used to prevent the pain, or a soft collar may be used to limit neck flexion.
Burning, aching or “girdling” around the body are all neurologic in origin. The technical name for them isdysesthesias. These pains are often treated with the anticonvulsant medication gabapentin (Neurontin®). Dysesthesias may also be treated with an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil®), which modifies how the central nervous system reacts to pain. Other treatments include wearing a pressure stocking or glove, which can convert the sensation of pain to one of pressure; warm compresses to the skin, which may convert the sensation of pain to one of warmth; and over-the-counter acetaminophen (Tylenol® and others) which may be taken daily, under a physician’s supervision.
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta®) was approved by the FDA in 2004 for treatment of depression and treatment of pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Cymbalta® belongs to the group of medications known as selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs). Although not specifically approved for use in MS, its effectiveness in diabetic neuropathy makes it a suitable candidate for the treatment of neuropathic pain in MS, and MS specialists consider it a good treatment option for people with MS.
Pregabalin (Lyrica®), also approved by the FDA in 2004, is recommended for the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with diabetes, fibromyalgia and certain types of seizures. Although not specifically approved for use in MS, it is also considered a good treatment option for people with MS.

Chronic Pain

Burning, aching, prickling or “pins and needles” may be chronic rather than acute. The treatments are the same as for the acute dysesthesias described above.
Pain of spasticity has its own subcategories. Muscle spasms or cramps, called flexor spasms, may occur. Treatments include medication with baclofen (Lioresal®) or tizanidine (Zanaflex®), ibuprofen, or other prescription strength anti-inflammatory agents. Treatment also includes regular stretching exercises and balancing water intake with adequate sodium and potassium, as shortages in either of these can cause muscle cramps. Tightness and aching in joints is another manifestation of spasticity, and generally responds well to the treatments described above.
Back and other musculoskeletal pain in MS can have many causes, including spasticity. Pressure on the body caused by immobility, incorrect use of mobility aids, or the struggle to compensate for gait and balance problems may all contribute. An evaluation to pinpoint the source of the pain is essential. Treatments may include heat, massage, ultrasound, physical therapy and treatment for spasticity.

Pain and the Emotions

Most pain in MS can be treated. But not all pain a person with MS has is due to MS. Whatever the source, pain is a complex problem that should not be ignored. Many factors may contribute, including fear and worry. A multidisciplinary pain clinic may be able to treat chronic disabling pain with medication in combination with such alternative therapies as biofeedback, hypnosis, yoga, meditation or acupuncture. Self-help may also play an important role in pain control. People who stay active and maintain positive attitudes are often able to reduce the impact of pain on their quality of life.


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A Busy schedule of MS Education programs

An extended period in-between podcast. As you will hear about in this video we have been very busy expanding our programs and are excited about what it means for the future.

Learn more, click here





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Pseudobulbar Affect: When You Can't Stop Laughing, or Crying

By JANE E. ALLEN, ABC News Medical Unit

When David Diehl, a third-generation family farmer, became aparaplegic five days after an autoimmune condition attacked his spinal cord in 1991, he began driving his tractor and combine using rails and his hands. When his doctor diagnosed multiple sclerosis in 1998, he made adjustments. When the MS left him blind in his left eye in 2000, he relied on faith and family to move beyond it.

But what really threw him was breaking into uncontrollable laughter at a friend's funeral three years ago, when he bit his tongue so hard to stifle it that "I could almost taste blood."

That involuntary laughter, and sudden, uncontrollable crying jags, are part of a neurological disorder that left Diehl, of East Helena, Mont., confused and apologetic. The inappropriate emotional outbursts during serious heart-to-heart talks with his wife Arlene stressed their otherwise rock-solid 35-year marriage. She missed her formerly good-natured husband. It wasn't easy to have him interrupt a serious talk by laughing at her.

LEARN MORE ---->>> WATCH VIDEO -  Click here

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Monday, May 20, 2013

Clinical Notes: Answer Emerges to MS Drug Puzzle


The mystery of why a drug for one autoimmune disease can cause another may have been solved. Also this week: a new oral nimodipine formulation aimed at reducing medication errors.
Mechanism Found for Alemtuzumab Side Effect
Researchers think they may have figured out why a drug that is highly effective against one autoimmune disease can sometimes trigger another.
The CD52-targeted biologic drug alemtuzumab (Lemtrada) is in late-stage development for multiple sclerosis, with long-term efficacy shown with just two annual courses of treatment. But, in a few patients, the agent appears to prompt an autoimmune attack on the thyroid or other organs. The mechanism has been unclear.
A new study from researchers in Australia and China, published in Nature Immunology, suggests a possible answer. They found that T cells expressing CD52 downregulated other T cells in vitro. Also, examination of samples from human patients with type 1 diabetes (the autoimmune form) showed low counts of these CD52+ cells as well as impaired function in the few that did exist.
In another set of experiments in diabetes-prone young mice, injecting the animals with lymphocyte populations lacking the CD52+ subset resulted in accelerated development of diabetes.
The researchers suggested that depletion of CD52 T cells -- as occurs after alemtuzumab treatment -- may unleash other T cells to attack host tissues, resulting in autoimmune disease.
Source: MedPage Today


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GUIDE TO STAYING ON TRACK WITH AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide)


1KEEP UP WITH YOUR ONCE-DAILY PILL AND YOUR FIRST 6 MONTHS OF MONTHLY MONITORING

Once you've been prescribed AUBAGIO it's important to take your pill once a day, every day, as directed by your doctor in order to have the best possible outcomes.
TIPS FOR REMEMBERING YOUR ONCE-DAILY PILL:
  • Make it part of the routine.
    It can be helpful to match up taking the medication with a normal, daily activity such as eating a meal or going to bed.
  • Keep medications where you'll notice them, but out of the reach of children.
    If you like to take your medication with food, put your pills on the dinner table, or wherever you eat. If you take your medication in the morning, put your pills someplace you will see as part of your morning routine.
  • Keep a medication schedule or calendar
    Write a list of the medications you take, how often you take them, and any special directions. This can be especially helpful if you are taking many different medicines. You can even keep the list on a calendar and check off each dose as you take it.
  • Ask for help
    Ask someone to remind you to take your medicine each day if needed or set an alarm.
  • Set a reminder or alarm
    Use a timer, cell phone alarm, or alert to remind yourself when your dose is due.


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GET YOUR FREE MS Health Training


Join Now for FREE MS Health Training  

MS Health University offers FREE online 
MS Health Coaching Classes. 

  Join MS Health University -- CLICK THIS LINK:





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Sunday, May 19, 2013

Using Smartphones for Complex Diagnostic Challenges


Topol on Using Smartphones for Complex Diagnostic Challenges

Eric J. Topol, MD
DisclosuresMay 15, 2013
Dr. Eric Topol, Director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute and Editor-in-Chief of Medscape. In The Creative Destruction of Medicine series, named for the book I wrote, I'm trying to zoom in on the critical aspects of how the digital world will create better healthcare. Smartphones and supercomputers -- where are we going with that? Let me go through some background.
Click this link to then have access to an interesting video on the topic shown: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/803799?src=wnl_edit_specol&uac=105130AZ





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