Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews -- Be empowered with MS news by registering with us: www.register.msviewsandnews.org

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

============================================================

Saturday, July 20, 2013

Research collaboration to tackle multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease

July 20, 2013

Research into multiple sclerosis and motor neurone disease is to be boosted with an international collaboration to further understanding of these illnesses.

Experts from the University of Edinburgh and the Massachusetts-based biotechnology company Biogen Idec will work together to seek greater insight into the cell processes behind these debilitating conditions.

This will include identifying drug compounds that could potentially be used as treatments.
The three-year collaboration will combine the University's expertise in translational medicine - which develops laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients - with Biogen Idec's strength in drug discovery and development.

Siddharthan Chandran, Professor of Neurology at the University of Edinburgh's College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, said: "This landmark partnership is a brilliant example of academic-industrial collaboration in the field of discovery science. Only by better understanding the biological processes behind these devastating diseases can we hope to discover new and effective therapies."

Clinicians and scientists, based at Edinburgh BioQuarter - Scotland's flagship lifesciences project - will be involved in the project, which will draw on the University's strength in neuroscience, stem cell research and regeneration.

The initiative is being funded by Biogen Idec, which is known for its strength in developing therapies for neurological disorders, particularly its portfolio of treatments for patients with multiple sclerosis.

"We have embraced academic collaborations as a part of our strategy to maintain a vibrant and innovative research organization and better understand the underlying biology of neurodegenerative disease. Our research partnership with the University of Edinburgh is an excellent example of this strategy," said Ken Rhodes, Vice President of Neurology Research at Biogen Idec. "We are committed to continuing to improve the treatment of people with MS and motor neuron diseases, and this collaboration is expected to provide an in-depth portrait of their pathophysiology, and identify important new targets for potential therapies."


Article source: News-Medical


……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Additional Published Results from National MS Society-Funded CCSVI Study

Jul 18, 2013

Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have published additional results from a National MS Society-supported study investigating CCSVI(chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency) using imaging techniques to examine blood outflow from the brain. Results of the first part of this study using Doppler ultrasound were previously published. This part of the study was conducted to learn to what extent ultrasound findings were supported by other imaging techniques. The team used magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and transluminal venography (TLV) in a subgroup of people with MS who had already undergone ultrasound vein scanning. They reported poor agreement between ultrasound and MRV, and that TLV detected no pressure readings that would indicate functional vein blockages. The study, by Staley A. Brod, MD, Jerry S. Wolinsky, MD, and colleagues, was recently published early online in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal.
Background: In June 2010, the National MS Society (USA) and the MS Society of Canada committed over $2.4 million to support seven new research projects on the role of CCSVI in MS, a postulated abnormality of blood drainage from the brain and spinal cord in MS originally reported by Paolo Zamboni, MD (University of Ferrara, Italy). In the interim since the Society-funded studies began, there have been conflicting results reported on the prevalence of CCSVI in MS, and the emergence of reports of CCSVI in people who do not have MS. There has also been variability in the methods used to study this phenomenon, including by Dr. Zamboni.
The Society-supported projects examine the structure and function of veins draining the brain and spinal cord in people representing a spectrum of MS types, severities and durations, and compare them to structure and function of veins in people with other diseases and healthy volunteers. The studies incorporate high standards of experimental blinding and controls designed to provide objective results.
To read this study, click here

……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Friday, July 19, 2013

US and EU Regulatory Authorities Accept PLEGRIDY™ (peginterferon beta-1a) Marketing Applications for Review

July 19, 2013

WESTON, Mass.--()--Today Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) announced that U.S. and EU regulatory authorities have accepted the marketing applications for the review of PLEGRIDY™ (peginterferon beta-1a), the company’s pegylated subcutaneous injectable candidate for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted Biogen Idec’s Biologics License Application (BLA) for marketing approval of PLEGRIDY in the United States and granted the company a standard review timeline. The Marketing Authorisation Application (MAA) of PLEGRIDY for review in the European Union was also validated by the European Medicines Agency.
“PLEGRIDY, if approved, could offer a less frequent dosing schedule, a favorable safety profile, and the potential to become the preferred interferon treatment.”
The regulatory applications included positive one-year results from the two-year global Phase 3 ADVANCE study. The data demonstrated that PLEGRIDY met all primary and secondary endpoints by significantly reducing disease activity including relapses, disability progression and brain lesions compared to placebo, and showed favorable safety and tolerability profiles at one year.
“We expect that interferons will remain an important and widely used option for patients with MS. At one-year, PLEGRIDY demonstrated significant reductions in relapses and disability progression, as well as a robust impact on several MRI endpoints,” said Douglas E. Williams, Ph.D., Biogen Idec’s executive vice president of Research and Development. “PLEGRIDY, if approved, could offer a less frequent dosing schedule, a favorable safety profile, and the potential to become the preferred interferon treatment.”
About PLEGRIDY
PLEGRIDY is a new molecular entity in which interferon beta-1a is pegylated to extend its half-life and prolong its exposure in the body. PLEGRIDY is a member of the interferon class of treatments, which is often used as a first-line treatment for MS.
About ADVANCE
The two-year Phase 3 ADVANCE clinical trial is a global, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PLEGRIDY in 1,516 patients with relapsing-remitting MS.
The study investigates two dose regimens of PLEGRIDY, 125 mcg administered subcutaneously every two weeks or every four weeks compared to placebo. The analysis for all primary and secondary efficacy endpoints occurred at one year. After the first year, patients on placebo are re-randomized to one of the PLEGRIDY arms for the duration of the second year of the study. After completing two years in the ADVANCE study, patients have the option of enrolling in an open-label extension study called ATTAIN and will be followed for up to four years.

……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

8 Ways to Improve Your Quality of Life

from WebMD


From your doctors to your home and career, follow these tips and you'll be better prepared for living well with MS.
Read Article



 




It's common to have signs of MS that seem to get better by themselves. Don't be fooled.
Read Article
How long a new or worsening symptom lasts determines if you should call your doctor.
View Slideshow
Optic neuritis is often an early sign of MS. See which symptoms require treatment.
Read Article
She's had MS for 22 years. Is it to blame for leg pain? What's the best treatment?
Join Conversation





……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Common drugs could be given to MS patients

Common drugs could be given to MS patients

Drugs prescribed to people with motor neurone disease, asthma and heart disease could be used to help improve the lives of patients with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS).

Researchers at University College London believe the medications could slow down the condition's progression by protecting the brain.

The drugs are amiloride – which is used to treat heart conditions; ibudilast – an asthma drug from Japan; and riuzole – the only current treatment available for motor neurone disease patients.

They will be tested on around 500 people with late-stage MS at clinical trials to be held across England and Scotland.

Dr Jeremy Chataway, a consultant neurologist at University College London, told the BBC: "There is no treatment for secondary progressive MS. This is a really appropriate and scientific way of getting a pipeline of drugs so that we can one day get a treatment that works."

It is estimated that around 100,000 are currently living with MS in the UK.

Article found here

……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Alkermes Adds Multiple Sclerosis Pill to Expanding Pipeline

BY Adam Feuerstein|07/18/13 






Alkermes CEO Richard Pops, as you might expect, struck a very optimistic tone about his bolstered pipeline during a presentation in downtown Boston.
"We're addressing big markets, big drug opportunities with modern science," said Pops, reminding investors once again that the days of Alkermes being known only for cashing royalty checks on its drug delivery technologies are over.
The most intriguing of the new drugs announced Wednesday was an enhanced and novel prodrug of monomethyl fumarate (MMF), the active ingredient inside Biogen Idec's (BIIB_)multiple sclerosis pill Tecfidera.
Alkermes showed preclinical data Wednesday suggesting its MMF prodrugs (the company has two candidates in development) could be dosed once per day (Tecfidera is taken twice a day) and cause fewer gastrointestinal side effects.
The company expects to seek permission from FDA to begin human testing of its MMF prodrugs for multiple sclerosis in 2014, with a phase I study slated to begin mid-year. Composition of matter patents have been filed, which if granted, would give the drugs long patent protection, Alkermes said.
Source:  The Street.com
……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Small Study Suggests Possible Benefit for Skin Patch to Reduce Immune Activity in Multiple Sclerosis

Jul 09, 2013
Research - Stop buttonPolish researchers reported results of a small clinical trial in which a skin patch containing myelin peptides (portions of the substance that insulates nerve fibers and is a target of the immune attack on the brain and spinal cord in MS) were administered to 20 people with relapsing-remitting MS via a skin patch, resulting in significant reductions in disease activity on imaging scans and relapses, compared with 10 people given an inactive placebo patch. Over one year, the treatment was found to be safe and well tolerated. Further studies in larger numbers of people are necessary to determine whether this method has potential as a safe and effective treatment approach for people with MS. Agata Walczak, MD, PhD, and Krzysztof Selmaj, MD, PhD (University of Lodz, Poland) and colleagues report their findings in JAMA Neurology (Published online July 1, 2013).
Background: In MS, immune cells called T cells attack and destroy myelin, the substance that protects nerve fibers, and cause other damage in the brain and spinal cord. These attacks lead to clinical symptoms. In people who don’t have MS, these T cells do not attack myelin because it is recognized as part of their own body, and their immune systems are trained to be “tolerant” to myelin and so do not attack it. One goal in MS therapy is to selectively restore normal tolerance to one’s own myelin, leaving the rest of the immune system intact.  In previous studies, researchers have administered a myelin protein (myelin basic protein) orally to mice with EAE, an MS-like disease, and succeeded in suppressing disease, but a clinical trial of this approach involving people with MS was not successful.

……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

TAKE CONTROL OF MS RELAPSE - LEARN FROM A QUESTCOR EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM







QUESTCOR'S NATIONAL MS EVENTS CALENDAR IS ACCESSIBLE HERE:




CLICK BANNER TO FIND A QUESTCOR MS LEARNING PROGRAM IN THE USA
    (DEPENDING ON SPEED OF YOUR COMPUTER, THIS CAN TAKE TIME TO OPEN)





……..
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Drug to treat multiple sclerosis may also hold promise for treating cardiac hypertrophy

July 17, 2013

A drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis may also hold promise for treating cardiac hypertrophy, or thickening of the cardiac muscle--a disorder that often leads toheart failure, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine report.

The findings are published in the July 16 issue of Circulation: Heart Failure.

Cardiac hypertrophy is a slow thickening of the heart muscle that shrinks the interior volume of the heart, forcing the organ to work harder to pump a diminishing volume of blood.
"There comes a day when the heart just can't keep up any more, and it fails," says R. John Solaro, UIC distinguished university professor and head of physiology and biophysics.
Cardiac hypertrophy, which afflicts one in 500 people, can be caused by high blood pressure or inherited through genes that control contraction of the heart.

Solaro and his colleagues believe that if the thickening of the heart muscle could be slowed, or maybe even reversed, heart failure could be prevented.

Solaro and his UIC colleague Yunbo Ke, research assistant professor of physiology and biophysics, were interested in a chemical derived from a fungus used in traditional Chinese medicine as an eternal-youth nostrum. That compound, designated FTY-720, has been developed into a drug to treat multiple sclerosis and is a chemical cousin to the drug most widely used to suppress the immune system and prevent organ rejection in transplant patients.

Read more
……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Evidence of delayed cancer detection in MS patients

By: BRUCE JANCIN,  Oncology Report Digital Network


ORLANDO – Patients with multiple sclerosis are at significantly reduced risk of being diagnosed with cancer, compared with the general population, but delayed cancer detection – that is, diagnostic neglect – appears to be a contributing factor, a study from British Columbia has shown.
"Diagnostic neglect is unlikely to account for the entire reduced cancer risk that we’re seeing, but I think it could have major implications for the health, well-being, and longevity of people with multiple sclerosis," said Helen Tremlett, Ph.D, a neuroepidemiologist at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
In the population-based Malignancy and Multiple Sclerosis (MaMS) study, she and her coinvestigators linked data from the British Columbia MS registry with the provincial cancer registry. The study included 6,820 MS patients who visited a British Columbia MS clinic in 1980-2004. Most had never been exposed to an immunomodulatory therapy. They had a collective 110,666 person-years of follow-up. Their cancer incidence over time was compared with that of the age-, sex-, and calendar year–matched general population of British Columbia.
Bruce Jancin/IMNG Medical Media

Dr. Helen Tremlett

The standardized incidence ratio for all cancers in the MS cohort was 0.86, meaning MS patients had a highly significant overall 14% reduction in the risk of being diagnosed with cancer. The risk reduction was particularly striking for colorectal cancer: Patients with MS were 44% less likely than controls to be diagnosed with this malignancy.
The cancer risk reductions were similar in men and women with MS, and in those with relapsing-remitting as compared with primary progressive MS, Dr. Tremlett reported at the fifth Cooperative Meeting of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers and the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis.
Of note, the cancer risk reduction identified in the MaMS study was consistent with an earlier meta-analysis of five studies by other investigators around the world, who concluded that the risk of being diagnosed with cancer was 8% lower in MS patients than controls, a statistically significant difference (J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry 2010;81:1413-4).

……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Gray matter damage linked to multiple sclerosis

Iron-containing deposits in the gray matter of the brain have been found in patients with multiple sclerosis.

The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still not completely understood. Researchers at the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center and Jacobs Neurological Institute, in the USA, are using advanced magnetic resonance imaging to study the brain in MS. They report an interesting finding.
Previously it’s been thought that MS arises from lesions in the brain’s white matter. But the researchers have found lesions within the gray matter and, what’s more, these seem to contain a high level of iron. The extent of these lesions could be correlated with difficulty in walking and with cognitive problems. Why iron is present is still a bit of a mystery. It might be that people with MS have a leaky blood-brain barrier which allows the iron to enter. Or iron may be deposited as a result of brain cell death. Whatever the underlying process, this is clearly a fruitful new line of research.
Source: The AlmaGest




……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Monday, July 15, 2013

Free Live Teleconference: “Improving Mobility by Managing Fatigue”

Join the MSF for a free, live teleconference presented by Herbert Karpatkin, PT, DSc, NCS, MCSC -- a Certified MS Clinical Specialist, Clincial Neurological Physical Therapist. The topic will be how to manage fatigue with the goal of improving mobility. A brief presentation will be followed by a question and answer session.

The conference will be held on Wednesday July 24, 2013 from 9:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Pacific Time)

For quick access, go to https://ccc.spiderphone.com/23441168
(This link will help connect both your browser and telephone to the call)


OR dial 1 (888) 550-5602 or +1 212-812-2800 and enter 2344 1168






……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others
……
REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register
…………………….
.

Su Vida Con Esclerosis MĂșltiple - Living with Multiple Sclerosis - a Spanish Language Education program on August 24th in Lake Mary, Florida

Click the Banner to Register
Click banner to increase size
===============================================




Patient plus up to (2) Guest - to attend

RSVP REQUIRED - register here: www.events.msvn.org




A COMPREHENSIVE LOOK AT MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS - In Orlando on August 6, 2013

Click the Banner to Register


================================




An A to Z learning event

Newly Diagnosed are Encouraged to attend

FREE RAFFLE PRIZES

RSVP required to attend this event

CLICK banner to Register
when page opens, click on the August 6th program to register



Gary Levin's Natural Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Review Reveals New Effective Multiple Sclerosis Treatment


Disclaimer: Neither 'Stu's Views & MS News' nor 'MS Views and News' endorse the information shown below. However, due to the request of many for herbal treatments we want to provide this information to you, for you to read and act at your own discretion.

Denver, Colorado (PRWEB) July 14, 2013

http://www.SclerosisTreatment.com Exposes Dr. Gary M. Levin's Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Book, a step-by-step method that rehabilitates the immune system and boosts the supporting body systems to eliminate all MS symptoms.

Natural Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Book provides people with an effective multiple sclerosis treatment, tips, safe methods, natural remedies, diet plans and detailed instructions that are easy to understand and follow.

Gary Levin has been a medical researcher and a surgeon in the United States for over 30 years now, and 20 years have been dedicated to treating patients with multiple sclerosis.

The main difference in this book is that Dr. Gary Levin provides information according to which MS is the deterioration of the myelin sheaths. This occurs when the immune system thinks that the myelin sheaths are a foreign intruder, which must be destroyed, and as a consequence electrical impulses are stopped or slowed as they travel through the body's nervous system.

Dr. Gary M. Levin's Book brings into the public attention the causes of MS, symptoms, signs, types, treatments and prevention, stating that MS is one of the most discouraging and debilitating conditions anyone can ever have.

This leads to patients loosing their muscular control, feelings in nerves and suffering cognitive changes. Added to these, different symptoms such as frequently feeling tired, feeling aches and pains, numbness, double vision, vertigo, muscle weakness in the arms and legs, muscle spasms and burning sensation in feet.

A number of drug therapies are currently approved by the http://www.FDA.Gov for the treatment of MS, but not one can provide a permanent cure, but every single one comes with side effects that affect patients' ability to maintain healthy relationships.

Even though for some the drug based therapies are benefit treatments, for many more the part where side effects affect their social life and ability to start a family, is considered a major downside.

The natural approach that is found in Dr. Gary M. Levin's Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Book easily makes this MS treatment catch the eye. It makes use of a variety of effective herbal ingredients and correct nutrition, aiming to provide people with knowledge concerning the body and immune system functions.

People are introduced to a variety of plants and natural products known to be efficient in slowing down episodes specific to MS [Super Soya Lecithin, Omega 3 (salmon oil), Evening Primrose Oil, Rhodiolin, Oxy Max] and they are encouraged to consume the previously mentioned. The desired purpose is boosting the reaction power of the immune system based on a healthy diet and lifestyle, thus stopping the imbalance that causes the MS episodes.


SOURCE : Digital Journal


To comment - click the Post comment link shown below


..


USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others

REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register


.

Sunday, July 14, 2013

With MS, Everything Changes

Posted by Laura Kolaczkowski—July 10th, 2013
A young man recently wrote in the MS Stories section on MultipleSclerosis.net about his life, and it brought up a theme I have often talked about – hearing the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis brings major changes to all of us and sometimes everything changes, as he wrote.
His was a story of wandering – well not really wandering, because his fanny was parked in front of his computer for several years, living in a virtual world of gamers.  Dropping out of not just school but living life, he was hidden away with only his online friends as his companions.  Then all that changed when his body began to fail, but I don’t want to ruin his own words and tell his story.
More than once I have heard that having Multiple Sclerosis, as crappy of a disease as it is, has made a person more productive and a better human – I know it did that for me.    Perhaps it was because my diagnosis came when I was 54, well past the usual young age of 20-40, and I was already well established in my relationships and job.   Our two children were already adults- I had done my job as mom and moved on to the fun part of being a grandma.  I had the luxury of time to understand my diagnosis, get excellent medical care thanks to my employer’s insurance, and then turn my attention to what I could do to connect with other in the MS community and perhaps make it a better world for all of us.
The best psychotherapy I could have for my MS was to take control in a way that others could benefit from as well. I began by finding an online community where I could interact with new members of the MS club- remembering the overwhelming part of those newly diagnosed days. Then I moved on to finding local support groups – attending meetings where I could sit with others also living with MS and engage in sharing ideas. In this way, MS changed me for the better.
I also became much more aware of the people around me who appeared to need extra help –I’ve never been insensitive to people needing kindness, but that awareness became heightened once I could envision myself possibly being in that role someday.  My mother tells me I was the child who didn’t know a stranger and my extrovert personality helps. MS didn’t change my personality but it gave me focus to watch out for others in a much different way.
Continue reading here: http://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/with-ms-everything-changes/

..


USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others


REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register


.

UPDATES to the Novartis GILENYA programs in Florida For July and August


Please CLICK this Link to find a program near you


..


MSV&N Logo- 128x100 with trademark-TM  MS Views and News™  Disclaimer
  As a service and courtesy to you, the MS Views and News (MSVN) organization wants to inform you of this educational opportunity.  MSVN™  has had no role in developing the content or choosing speakers for this program. MSVN™  respects your privacy and does not disclose your personal information to third parties. 

1)      Open the LINK that pertains to a program happening near you and then:  

2)      To register for the program, please use the contact number provided on that flyer.

.. .

Why America can never give up on medical research





..



USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others


REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register


.

Aylsham multiple sclerosis sufferer says cannabis-based drug ‘changed my life’

Saturday, July 13, 2013 

Teresa Pointer, from Aylsham, whose MS has been helped by using a new drug based on cannabis plant extracts.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLYTeresa Pointer, from Aylsham, whose MS has been helped by using a new drug based on cannabis plant extracts. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY
A new cannabis-based licensed drug has transformed the life of multiple sclerosis (MS) sufferer Teresa Pointer from Aylsham.
Mrs Pointer, 42, spotted an advertisement in the EDP eight years ago, asking people to take part in treatment trials at the James Paget University Hospital, Gorleston, and she has not looked back.
Today, thanks to two daily sprays of Sativex into her mouth, Mrs Pointer can sleep at night, walk for longer - and she has got her sense of humour back.
“I got in touch with Dr Willy Notcutt at the James Paget and then started on a clinical trial of Sativex. It was the best decision I’ve ever made and it’s done so much for me. It really has given me my life back,” said Mrs Pointer, who lives with her husband and two daughters in Hungate Street.
Teresa Pointer, from Aylsham, whose MS has been helped by using a new drug based on cannabis plant extracts.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLYTeresa Pointer, from Aylsham, whose MS has been helped by using a new drug based on cannabis plant extracts. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY
She was diagnosed in 2004 with MS, a disease which affects nerves in the brain and spinal cord.
An increase in muscle tone, or “spasticity”, is a common symptom, causing involuntary muscle spasms, immobility, disturbed sleep, and pain.
Although MS is incurable, treatments and specialists can help sufferers manage their symptoms.
Within two weeks of starting the trial, Mrs Pointer, whose health problems forced her to retire from her job as an assistant cook at Aylsham’s Bure Valley School, began to notice an improvement.
“It doesn’t take any of the symptoms away but it relieves them,” she said. The drug relaxed her muscles, easing the pain, discomfort and spasms when her legs would “try and jump off the bed”, which stopped her sleeping.

CONTINUE READING and then PLEASE, leave your comment below by clicking on the comment tab, here on this blog. (Facebook users will need to visit this blog to leave a comment)

..

USE OUR SHARE LINKS at the top of this page  - to provide this article to others

REMAIN up to date with MS News and Education
Visit: www.msviewsandnews.org  to register


.