Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews -- Be empowered with MS news by registering with us: www.register.msviewsandnews.org

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

============================================================

Friday, May 9, 2014

MS Treatment ‘Cleans’ Your Blood

MS Treatment 'Cleans' Your Blood
Plasmapheresis removes antibodies and helps manage flares for people with relapsing MS. Here’s how it works.

Plasma exchange, also known as plasmapheresis, is a way to "clean" your blood. It works sort of like kidney dialysis. During the treatment, plasma -- the liquid part of your blood -- gets replaced with plasma from a donor or with a plasma substitute.
People with some forms of multiple sclerosis use plasma exchange to manage sudden, severe attacks, sometimes called relapses or flare-ups. Their plasma could have certain proteins that are attacking their own body. When you take out the plasma, you get rid of those proteins, and symptoms may get better.

How It Works

You can get plasma exchange in the hospital or at an outpatient center. The process isn't painful, and you won't need anesthesia.
You'll lie in bed or sit in a reclining chair.
A nurse or a specialist will put a needle attached to a thin tube, called a catheter, into a vein in each arm. If your arm veins are too small, you may have to have a needle in your shoulder or groin instead. 
Your blood comes out through one of the tubes and goes into a machine that separates your plasma from your blood cells. Then your blood cells get mixed with fresh plasma, and the new blood mixture goes back into your body through the other tube.
……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

No comments: