Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews -- Be empowered with MS news by registering with us: www.register.msviewsandnews.org

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

============================================================

Friday, May 9, 2014

Multiple sclerosis discovery may explain gender gap


Multiple sclerosis Scientists said the S1PR2 protein was linked to multiple sclerosis

Related Stories

A key difference in the brains of male and female MS patients may explain why more women than men get the disease, a study suggests.
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in the US found higher levels of protein S1PR2 in tests on the brains of female mice and dead women with MS than in male equivalents.
Four times more women than men are currently diagnosed with MS.
Experts said the finding was "really interesting".
MS affects the nerves in the brain and spinal cord, which causes problems with muscle movement, balance and vision. It is a major cause of disability, and affects about 100,000 people in the UK.
Blood-brain barrier
Abnormal immune cells attack nerve cells in the central nervous system in MS patients.
There is currently no cure, although there are treatments that can help in the early stages of the disease.
Researchers in Missouri looked at relapsing remitting MS, where people have distinct attacks of symptoms that then fade away either partially or completely. About 85% of people with MS are diagnosed with this type.
Continue reading from here


……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

No comments: