Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

=================

CHAMPIONS TACKLING MS - AWARDS Dinner, Honoring Aaron Boster, MD and Jon e. Glaser, DDS - now open for registration. Visit www.events.msvn.org

Friday, May 2, 2014

Teva Pharmaceuticals Studies on Multiple Sclerosis Treatments Exhibited By UT Houston Researcher

UTHealth HoustonOne of the global leaders in pharmaceuticals, Israel-based Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., recently revealed their sponsorship of 14 abstracts of studies on their well-established multiple sclerosis treatments COPAXONE® and laquinimod.
The abstracts were presented at the 66th annual American Academy of Neurology (AAN) conference in Philadelphia, and, according to Teva, successfully added recently developed information on the clinical benefits of a thrice-a-week COPAXONE® 40mg/mL regimen for multiple sclerosis patients. The studies also shed light on its effectiveness, safety, and tolerability.
COPAXONE® is an injection of glatiramer acetate and is used to treat individuals with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. The findings from an open-label Phase IIIb GLatiramer Acetate low frequenCy safety and patIent ExpeRience (GLACIER) experiment, based on a comparison of the drug’s safety and tolerability under the recent trice-a-week COPAXONE® 40 mg/mL with a daily dose of 20mg/mL, were exhibited during an oral presentation by chief investor, Dr. Jerry Wolinsky, a Bartels Family and Opal C. Rankin Professor of Neurology at The University of Texas Medical School in Houston. Dr. Wolinsky has been involved in other multiple sclerosis research, including a newly-discovered link between HIV and MS that may suggest new treatment options.
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd.’s president and chief scientific officer, Dr. Michael Hayden, said that, “the clinical and real-world significance of the data presented underscore Teva’s commitment to developing solutions to address unmet patient needs.” Furthermore, he added that, “our deep understanding of MS patients’ needs, keeps us at the leading edge of MS therapy development, with a single-minded focus on supporting the MS community in the provision of the highest standards of care possible, now and in the future.”
Source: BioNews
……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Drug Treatments

A number of drugs have been shown to slow the progression of MS in some people. These are called the disease-modifying drugs. They include:
  • Aubagio (teriflumonide)
  • Avonex (interferon beta-1a)
  • Betaseron (interferon beta-1b)
  • Copaxone (glatiramer acetate)
  • Gilenya (fingolimod)
  • Novantrone (mitoxantrone)
  • Rebif (interferon beta-1a)
  • Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate)
  • Tysabri (natalizumab)

How Do These Drugs Work?

All of these drugs work by suppressing, or altering, the activity of the body's immune system. Thus, these therapies are based on the theory that MS is, at least in part, a result of an abnormal response of the body's immune system that causes it to attack the myelin surrounding nerves.

Do the Drugs Cure MS?

These drugs do not cure MS, but they do reduce the frequency and severity of attacks and the development of new brain lesions. In addition, they slow down the progression of MS, reducing future disability.
These drugs can improve the quality of life for many people with MS. Therefore, most doctors suggest that treatment with one of these drugs be started in most people as soon as a diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS has been made.

Is Drug Treatment Right for Me?

The decision concerning whether or when to begin treatment with one of these medications is best made by you and your doctor. Factors that should be considered include potential side effects, benefits, frequency, method of medication delivery, and your personal concerns, priorities and lifestyle.
The most important goal is to find a treatment you can use comfortably and consistently. Each pharmaceutical company offers customer support and may also provide some financial assistance for qualifying individuals without prescription drug coverage.
Here's what you need to know about the most commonly used MS drugs.
Aubagio (teriflunomide)
 Use: Treatment of relapsing forms of MS.
 How administered: a tablet by mouth
 Frequency of use: Daily
 Common side effects: Diarrhea, liver problems, nausea, hair loss
 Support Program: 855-MSOne2One (855-676-6326)

Avonex (interferon beta-1a)
 Use: Treatment of relapsing forms of MS, and to treat after an initial episode of inflammation
 How administered: Injection into a muscle
 Frequency of use: Weekly
 Common side effects: Mild flu-like symptoms
 Support Program: MS Active Source 800-456-2255

Betaseron (interferon beta-1b)
 Use: Treatment of relapsing forms of MS
 How administered: Injection under the skin
 Frequency of use: Every other day
 Common side effects: Mild flu-like symptoms
 Support Program: MS Pathways 800-788-1467

Copaxone (glatiramer acetate)
 Use: Treatment of relapsing-remitting MS
 How administered: Injection under the skin
 Frequency of use: Three times per week
 Common side effects: Reaction at the injection site
 Support Program: Shared Solutions 800-887-8100

Gilenya (fingolimod)
 Use: Treatment of relapsing MS
 How administered: A pill by mouth
 Frequency of use: Daily
 Common side effects: headache, diarrhea, back pain, and abnormal liver tests

Novantrone (mitoxantrone)
 Use: Treatment of rapidly worsening relapsing-remitting MS
and for progressive-relapsing or secondary-progressive forms of MS
 How administered: By IV
 Frequency of use: Once every 3 months or four times a year. Maximum dose 8-12 doses
 Common side effects: Nausea, hair thinning, decreased white blood cell count
 Support Program: MS LifeLines 877-447-3243

source: WebMD

……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

Take low-fat diet to avoid fatigue in multiple sclerosis

New York, May 2 (IANS) Following a plant-based low fat diet may help people who suffer from fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), research says.
"This study showed the low-fat diet might offer some promising help with the fatigue that often comes with MS," said Dennis Bourdette, chair of department of neurology, Oregon Health & Science University.
MS is an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged, disrupting the ability of parts of the nervous system to communicate, resulting in physical, mental and sometimes psychiatric problems.
The study investigated the effects of following a diet called the McDougall Diet, devised by John McDougall.
The diet is partly based on an MS-fighting diet developed in the 1940s and 1950s by the late Roy Swank, a former head of the division of neurology at OHSU.
The McDougall diet, very low in saturated fat, focuses on eating starches, fruits and vegetables and does not include meat, fish or dairy products.
The study, which began in 2008, looked at the diet's effect on the most common form of MS, called relapsing-remitting MS.
The study measured indicators of MS among a group of people who followed the McDougall Diet for 12 months and a control group that did not.

……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

Autoimmune Diseases May Succumb to New Drug Strategy

UCSF/Harvard Genome Study Identifies Three Possible Drug Candidates for Multiple Diseases


By Jeffrey Norris on April 30, 2014

New pharmaceuticals to fight autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, may be identified more effectively by adding genome analysis to standard drug screening, according to a new study by a research team led by UC San Francisco and Harvard researchers, in collaboration with Tempero and GlaxoSmithKlein.
In a study reported online April 17, 2014 in the journal Immunity, the scientists combined drug screening with state-of-the-art techniques for analyzing the genome, leading to three small molecules that improved symptoms in a mouse form of multiple sclerosis.
The three potential drug candidates, selected from a large library of screened chemicals, each knocked down the response of Th17 cells, a type of immune cell that drives many autoimmune diseases by attacking normal cells in the body. More specifically, the drugs homed in on an essential molecule within the Th17 cells.
“We examined what makes Th17 cells – which play a crucial role in multiple autoimmune diseases – distinct from other closely related T cells within the immune system,” said Alexander Marson, MD, PhD, a leading T cell expert and member of the UCSF Diabetes Center. “Then we investigated several small molecules that inhibit the development and function of these cells. When the Th17 cells were hit by these molecules we saw less severe multiple-sclerosis-like symptoms in the mice.”
The research team, led by Marson and Vijay K. Kuchroo, PhD, an immunologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and Harvard Medical School, combined powerful techniques to shed light on a class of protein molecules within cells known as transcription factors.
Drug designers have rarely targeted transcription factors. Each transcription factor binds to DNA at a unique set of locations along the 23 pairs of chromosomes, and thereby influences which genes are turned on and off to trigger the protein production that drives cell development and function.
Different transcription factors shape the development of different types of T cells within the immune system, Marson and others are discovering. In their new study, Marson found that the transcription factor called ROR gamma t has a unique role in guiding development of Th17 cells, while inhibiting the development of other immune cells.
Preventing Th17 cells from developing by inhibiting the function of ROR gamma t appears to be an effective strategy for fighting autoimmune diseases, Marson said.
“There already are drugs in clinical trials for autoimmune diseases – including psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis – that are antibodies for IL-17 or IL-17 receptors,” Marson said, referring to signaling molecules secreted by Th17 cells that can help trigger an attack our own healthy tissue, and the receptors that receive those signals. “This is an entirely different and promising approach to fight autoimmune disease," he said.
“Our studies map a path to targeting transcription factors and provide both insight into how transcriptional regulators shape the identity and affect the development of Th17 cells, and also into how different drug molecules might affect these regulatory circuits in the cells,” he said.

……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------

Thank you    
…………………….
.

Multiple sclerosis patients lobbied at Beacon Hill


BOSTON, Mass (WWLP) – Multiple sclerosis patients can have symptoms as mild as numbness in the limbs, to the most severe paralysis.  They pushed lawmakers for more accessibility in employee offices.
People with multiple sclerosis met with state lawmakers about the need for employee offices and “employees only” spaces to be more accessible to them. The Americans with Disabilities Act, or A-D-A, requires all public buildings be handicap accessible, but it doesn’t cover employee entrances. Those with M-S not only struggle from the disease, they have a hard time simply getting around.
Carol Steinberg from the Multiple Sclerosis Society told 22News “It’s a problem of getting into buildings. You roll up to a restaurant and you see three big steps and you feel like you’ve been slapped in the face.”
The Architectural Access Board within the A-D-A wants to expand its jurisdiction to employee areas, parking lots with less than fifteen spaces and old housing. That way, people with M-S and disabilities can easily access any building entrance.
Expanding jurisdiction will also ensure all buildings comply with federal law, as well as the Architectural Access Board.

……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information

…………………….
.

Thursday, May 1, 2014

New Data Reinforce Efficacy of TECFIDERA® (Dimethyl Fumarate) in MS Patients with High Disease Activity


CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--
New data reinforce the efficacy of TECFIDERA in a wide range of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), as well as support its favorable safety and tolerability profile in the real-world setting. These data were presented by Biogen Idec (BIIB) at the 66th American Academy of Neurology (AAN) annual meeting in Philadelphia
A new post-hoc analysis from the Phase 3 studies, DEFINE and CONFIRM, reinforce that TECFIDERA can be effective in RRMS patients with high disease activity. In addition, new data from the Phase 4 MANAGE study show that gastrointestinal (GI) events experienced by patients in the clinical practice setting were mostly mild to moderate and generally manageable, and significantly decreased in prevalence within the first two months of TECFIDERA treatment.
“These new data further reinforce the benefits TECFIDERA’s strong efficacy may bring to a wide range of people with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS),” said Alfred Sandrock, M.D., Ph.D., group senior vice president and chief medical officer at Biogen Idec. “In addition, as we gain even more real-world experience with the therapy, it is encouraging to see that its tolerability profile remains manageable and that GI symptoms are largely transient.”
Efficacy in Patients with High Disease Activity
A post-hoc analysis of pooled data from the Phase 3 DEFINE and CONFIRM studies evaluated the efficacy of TECFIDERA in RRMS patients with highly active disease. The findings are consistent with the data from the overall intent-to-treat patient populations in DEFINE and CONFIRM, which supported the regulatory submissions for TECFIDERA globally.
Patients with highly active disease were defined as those who experienced two or more relapses in the year prior to entering DEFINE or CONFIRM and had one or more gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions at baseline (n=136). Higher relapse frequency and the prevalence of more brain lesions are associated with an increased risk of disease progression.
Results show that at two years, TECFIDERA taken twice daily (BID; n=45) significantly reduced annualized relapse rate (ARR) by 60 percent (p=0.0018) and the proportion of patients who relapsed by 63 percent (p=0.0030). There was no significant effect of TECFIDERA on 12-week confirmed disability progression.
“MS has a spectrum of activity, from mild to very severe, and ranges significantly among patients,” said Professor Michael Hutchinson, consultant neurologist, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Newman clinical research professor, University College Dublin, Ireland. “It is reassuring that TECFIDERA has demonstrated efficacy across a range of patient populations, including in those who have more active disease. This consistent benefit reinforces the importance of TECFIDERA as a powerful therapeutic agent in the MS treatment paradigm.”
MANAGE Tolerability Results
The open-label, single-arm MANAGE study evaluated the incidence and prevalence of GI-related adverse events (AEs) experienced by U.S. patients with relapsing forms of MS who initiated TECFIDERA treatment in a clinical practice setting. The study also assessed the overall effect of symptomatic therapies on patients’ GI symptoms. Patients were prompted twice a day to report GI-related AEs using an eDiary device and two numerical rating scales: the Modified Acute Gastrointestinal Symptom Scale (MAGISS) and the Modified Overall Gastrointestinal Symptom Scale (MOGISS).
Results show that GI events were largely transient, occurred most frequently in the first month of therapy and were mostly reported as mild to moderate in severity. By the 10th week of treatment, less than 10 percent of patients reported GI AEs. The incidence of discontinuation due to GI-related AEs was low (7.3 percent).
Of those who reported GI AEs, most patients (61.2 percent) used symptomatic therapies to manage the effects. By week 10, less than 10 percent of these patients were using symptomatic treatments.
The safety profile of TECFIDERA observed in MANAGE was consistent with that in the pivotal DEFINE and CONFIRM studies, with no new or worsening safety signals.
About MANAGE

.


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

Genzyme Announces Multi-Year Multiple Sclerosis Research Collaboration with Leading Academic Medical Center

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--
Genzyme, a Sanofi company (EURONEXT: SAN and NYSE: SNY), announced today the formation of a research collaboration with Cleveland Clinic focused on developing new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of MS.
This innovative collaboration aligns the research efforts of both organizations around projects which are designed to develop a deep understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of MS and to address the unmet medical needs in MS, particularly progressive forms of the disease. Initially the collaboration will focus on projects that explore strategies to address neurodegeneration, a hallmark of progressive MS, and novel technologies to better understand the pathology of the disease. The collaboration will be led by a joint steering committee comprised of Genzyme and Cleveland Clinic researchers and span a minimum of 5 years.
“As leaders in MS we want to advance and build a sustainable pipeline of novel therapeutic approaches, and our collaboration with Cleveland Clinic, along with our internal R&D efforts, reinforce Genzyme’s long-term commitment to the MS community,” said David Meeker, President and CEO, Genzyme. “We are excited to work collaboratively with a premier research and health care institution that has made many important contributions to better understanding this complex and devastating disease.”
Cleveland Clinic’s Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis has one of the largest and most comprehensive programs for MS care and research worldwide, managing more than 20,000 patient visits every year. The Center has a highly innovative and active research team, which has been at the forefront of MS advances for the past two decades.
“This collaboration will allow for the development of innovative approaches to evaluate potential new therapies for progressive MS,” said Dr. Jeffrey Cohen, M.D., Director of the Experimental Therapeutics Program at the Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis.
More than 2.3 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with MS, including approximately 400,000 people in the United States.

……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Targeting B Cells May Significantly Reduce Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis -

April 29, 2014

A new study suggests that targeting B cells, which are a type of white blood cell in the immune system, may be associated with reduced disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The study is released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.   

For the study, 231 people with relapsing-remitting MS received either a placebo or one of several low dosages of the drug ofatumumab, which is an anti-B cell antibody, for 24 weeks, with the first 12 weeks making up the placebo-controlled period. The main objective was to determine the effects of ofatumumab dosing regimens compared to placebo on the total number of new brain lesions assessed every four weeks over a 12-week period.   

All dose groups including placebo showed lesion activity in the first four weeks with lesion suppression in all ofatumumab dose groups from weeks four to 12. Researchers measured the amount of B cells in participants and compared that to the total number of new brain lesions that appeared on brain scans, which is a marker of disease activity. - 

The researchers found that when B cells were reduced to below a threshold of 64 cells per microliter, disease activity, as measured by appearance of new brain lesions, was significantly reduced. On average, participants had an annualized rate of less than one new brain lesion per year when B cells were maintained below a threshold of 32 to 64 cells per microliter, compared with 16 lesions without treatment.   

The most common side effects, defined as those occurring in at least five percent of participants and at a rate twice that of placebo for weeks zero to 12, were injection-related reaction, dizziness, anxiety, fever, respiratory tract infection and nerve pain.   

read more

……..

To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------

Thank you    
…………………….
.

StemGenex® Sees MS Patients Benefit from Adult Stem Cell Treatments

Multiple Sclerosis Patient Kristen Marr Shares Her Stem Cell Treatment Results

PR Newswire


LA JOLLA, Calif.April 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- As a wife and mother of 2 children, Kristen Marr was absolutely devastated when she was diagnosed with Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis in 2007.  Five years later, the disease had left her significantly debilitated.  Kristen had difficulty walking as her balance was completely off, her energy levels were constantly depleted and she was experiencing significant reductions in her cognitive ability.  She found it nearly impossible to accomplish things in her life that used to be so simple.  Her biggest concern was how she would take care of her two young children.

StemGenex(R) patient Kristen Marr shown here with her children this year.

In 2012 Kristen became one of the many patients who have chosen to use their own fat-derived stem cells to treat their multiple sclerosis.  Understanding that this is an experimental procedure, not approved by the FDA, she researched many stem cell treatment centers.  Kristen ultimately selected StemGenex as her partner in her fight against MS due to having access to U.S. board certified doctors, a compassionate staff and cutting edge stem cell treatments likeintra-nasal stem cell administration.

Fast forward to 2014.  Kristen has shown amazing improvements in her condition.  She has significant improvements in her balance, her energy is back and she no longer has any issues with her cognitive ability.  Kristen states, "I feel like I have a future full of hope and optimism.  I'm finally winning the battle against the attack on my body from Multiple Sclerosis. My stem cell therapy has given me the ability to be a mom again."

To learn more about StemGenex® and cutting edge stem cell therapy click here.

CONTACT: Joe Perricone, 800-609-7795

Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140429/81873

SOURCE StemGenex

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1881763#ixzz30Ntj0spM


……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.

Yoga: Giving Yourself The Gift Of Good Health During Midlife

Written By: Cathy Chester April 29, 2014

Yesterday I returned to a yoga class after an absence of a year and a half.  A frozen shoulder prevented me from attending the weekly class I love. I also missed Sheila, my gifted and compassionate instructor who arrived to class with a book of “Yoga for People with Multiple Sclerosis” and “Yoga For People Over 50″ in hand. She didn’t need the books, but having them endeared her to me even more.
yoga wellness
Now that I’m back in the yoga saddle again, I thought I’d repost something I wrote in 2012. If you’re looking for a way to sleep better, heal aches and pains, keep sickness at bay, improve flexibility, strengthen muscles, improve balance, help to prevent arthritis, keep your spinal discs supple, get your blood flowing, alleviate stress and worry, or lower blood sugar and LDL, yoga is perfect for you!  Read on:
“The body is your temple.  Keep it pure and clean for the soul to reside in.”  ~B.K.S. Iyengar, Yoga: The Path To Holistic Health
When I was first diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis I was 28 years old and in good physical shape.  I worked in Manhattan and walked 16 blocks from the Port Authority Bus Terminal to my office – in rain, snow or sunshine.
At the time, I lived in Weehawken, New Jersey, a township located along the Hudson River overlooking Manhattan.  Each day, after returning to my apartment, I’d slip into my workout clothes and pop my new Jane Fonda Workout video into my VCR (for those of you too young to know what a VCR is, it is a video cassette recorder).
Continue reading from here

……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------

Thank you    
…………………….
.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

UK News: Plymouth expert says MS drug should be available on NHS

A DRUG which has been licensed in America for four years is still not available on the NHS despite studies showing it could help 50 per cent of multiple sclerosis patients, a Derriford doctor has said.
Professor Jeremy Hobart said MS patients are having to pay £2,500 per year for the drug fampridine, which has been available in the USA since January 2010.
His comments come at the beginning of MS Week and as the MS Society launches its Treat Me Right campaign, to encourage sufferers to make sure they are getting the best treatment available.
The professor of clinical neurology and health measurement was involved in data analysis during clinical trials of the drug and is satisfied by the research surrounding it.
Prof Hobart said: “I’m supporting this because there is very good evidence that this drug is beneficial for people with MS. In Europe, the European Medicines Agency licensed it as ‘effective and safe’ in 2010. Four years later people with MS in the UK are still not able to get the drug.
“In the UK patients receive a month free from the drug company which is long enough to determine if it will help them.
“After that if they want to continue it costs £2,500 per year. MS is an incurable condition which affects people’s ability to work so sufferers have limited incomes.
“Having analysed the data myself as part of the research I am satisfied in my own mind that the drug is effective. There is clear evidence of benefit so fampridine should be made available on the NHS.”


Read more: http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/Plymouth-expert-says-MS-drug-available-NHS/story-21023451-detail/story.html#ixzz30KIuscdL





……..


To comment - click the comment link shown below
…….
Share our Articles with others
……
Sign-up at:  www.msviewsandnews.org 
To Keep CURRENT  and up to date with MS News and Information
 -------------
Donate Now Please - Click here
Thank you    
…………………….
.