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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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Saturday, December 20, 2014

How To Live Resilient and Unaffected by Stress During The Holidays

Dec 20, 2014 -  by Michelle
 Alva
Gratitude de-stresses
Stress is a perception that we are in danger, that something or a situation is of danger, unsafe and threatening to us. Our body is perfectly designed to move us away from things, situations, people and places in our lives that are dangerous and make us feel unsafe so that we may survive, be safe, calm and productive in our lives.
Chronic stress, feeling threatened over a long term duration, is hurtful to our body and mind. We are not designed to endure chronic stress over time. We are designed to experience stress under a short term duration. If we feel in danger all day or perceive a person, place or relationship as threatening and not move away from it, our body experiences adrenal fatigue and the feeling of being overwhelmed and shut down in order to survive.
Our bodies are designed to perceive stress, move away from it towards safety and then process the emotions and bodily changes associated with the stress. This re-balance time is necessary so we may return to a calm state of balance and harmony. We must rest and restore our body and mind after a stressful event so that our nervous system, hormones and immune system can re-boot and re-energize.
Too often we create stressful, threatening and hurtful thoughts and beliefs in our minds that cause our bodies to perceive danger all day. For example, “I am not safe being myself, I don’t like my thighs, I don’t trust anyone, I am not good enough, I am not lovable and I am stupid” are all statements and beliefs some of us play over and over again during the day which causes our bodies not to feel safe and supported. We may not be aware of these beliefs, as many of them have been there since our childhood according to Dr. Bruce LiptonAuthor of The Biology Of Belief.
What we choose to believe about stress is actually what greatly impacts how we perceive our stress.


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MS Emerging therapies with odd names...

Date: December 20, 2014

First, to learn how to say these pharma names of these emerging therapies


Daclizumab (Dac-li-zu-mab)  (trade name Zenapax)
is a therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody. It is used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation, especially in kidney transplants. The drug is also under investigation for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

BIOGEN IDEC AND ABBVIE ANNOUNCE POSITIVE TOP-LINE RESULTS FROM PHASE 3 STUDY INVESTIGATING DACLIZUMAB HIGH-YIELD PROCESS IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
− DAC HYP Demonstrated Superiority Over Interferon Beta-1a in Annualized Relapse Rate –
− Positive Results Set Stage for Regulatory Filings –
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. & NORTH CHICAGO, Ill. –  Biogen Idec and AbbVie  announced positive top-line results from the Phase 3 DECIDE clinical trial, designed to evaluate the superiority of once-monthly, subcutaneous daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) when compared to intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IFN β-1a), as a potential treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), the most common form of multiple sclerosis (MS). Results showed that DAC HYP was superior on the study’s primary endpoint, demonstrating a statistically significant 45 percent reduction in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared to IFN β-1a (p<0.0001).
“The results of the DECIDE study are compelling, with DAC HYP demonstrating robust efficacy compared to a current standard of MS care,” said Gilmore O’Neill, vice president, Global Neurology Clinical Development, Biogen Idec. “As a potential once-monthly therapy with a novel mechanism of action, we believe that, if approved, DAC HYP will be an important treatment option for people living with MS.”
Daclizumab works by binding to CD25, the alpha subunit of the IL-2 receptor of T cells. The drug is marketed in the US, but not in Europe

Read more  here




Ocrelizumab  (Ocre-li-zu-mab)
is a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. It targets mature B lymphocytes and hence is an immunosuppressive drug candidate. It is under development by Hoffmann–La Roche's subsidiary Genentech, and Biogen Idec.

Ocrelizumab in MS: Encouraging Long-term Data

Long-term follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the phase 2 trial of ocrelizumab suggest that the drug continues to be effective for up to 18 months after the last dose, with no new safety concerns identified.
The latest data from the phase 2 study with the drug, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeted against CD20-expressing B cells, were presented by lead investigator Stephen Hauser, MD, here at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) 65th Annual Meeting last week.
Results showed that patients having up to 4 treatment cycles of ocrelizumab and followed for as long as 18 months after the last dose had minimal new MRI activity and a low level of clinical disease activity. In addition, there were no new safety concerns and no reports of opportunistic infections.
"Major Blockbuster"?
READ MORE HERE







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Friday, December 19, 2014

What is the role of Ampyra in MS patients?

(Post date: 12/19/2014)

What is the role of dalfampridine (Ampyra) in multiple sclerosis patients? We asked four clinicians to comment: Brian Weinshenker, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; Neil Lava, MD, of Emory University in Atlanta; Andrew Goodman, MD, of the University of Rochester's Multiple Sclerosis Center; and Lana Zhovtis Ryerson, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center's Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center in New York City. The drug boosts walking ability in some patients, our panel agreed; trying it for a few weeks will identify those who respond without marked adverse effects.

Watch a video presentation on this subject by clicking here



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Warning signs of an MS flare-up, what can cause it, and how you can help prevent it.


What Happens During a Relapse?

When you experience a multiple sclerosis relapse (also known as an exacerbation or flare-up), it's because new damage in the brain or spinal cord disrupts nerve signals. That's why you might notice new symptoms or the return of old symptoms. A true relapse lasts more than 24 hours and happens at least 30 days after any previous relapses. Relapses vary in length, severity, and symptoms. Over time, symptoms should improve. Many people recover from their relapses without treatment.
Continue reading while watching a slideshow by clicking here




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Thursday, December 18, 2014

Kessler Study Recommends Wellness Program for Multiple Sclerosis

wellness and MSIn today’s healthcare environment, it is often not enough that patients are provided with the latest treatments. Good health is not merely the absence of injury or disease, but overall wellness that includes mental, spiritual and social health. A group of investigators from the Kessler Foundation recently published their findings from a psychoeducational wellness program for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) — an autoimmune neurological disorder that affects between 300,000 and 400,000 Americans and about 2.5 million individuals worldwide.
The researchers at Kessler conducted a 10-week wellness program and noted several improvements in MS patients. Health benefits were seen in patients’ mood, mental health, perceived stress, and pain. The study is currently available online as “Development and effectiveness of a psychoeducational wellness group for individuals living with MS: Description and outcomes.” in the International Journal of MS Care.

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How does one manage bladder symptoms in MS?

What are the best ways to manage the bladder symptoms of multiple sclerosis? We asked two experts to comment on this important but often neglected quality-of-life issue for MS patients: Benjamin Brucker, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center's urology department in New York City, and Brian Weinshenker, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. They pointed out that different types of urinary issues may present in MS patients, each with their own treatment approaches, and such issues may actually have other causes.
Click here to listen and watch a video presentation




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Relationship between iron accumulation and white matter injury in multiple sclerosis: a case-control study.

December 15, 2014

Iron in our bodies performs some fundamental functions such as transporting oxygen within the blood. However, in certain conditions, too much iron can harm us.

In healthy brains, iron is stored in the cells that produce myelin and in myelin sheaths. When, because of MS, these are destroyed, iron is released. This can lead to inflammation.

It has been reported that increased iron is associated with decreased brain volume. It can also precede brain atrophy, suggesting that it is involved with neurodegeneration.

Several studies have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can indirectly detect increased iron in the brains of people with MS. However the role of iron in disease progression and development of disability is poorly understood.

Biomarker
In 2007, researchers from New York University pioneered a new MRI technique to detect iron increase in the deep brain areas.

The same team recently published a study of 31 patients with MS and 17 healthy volunteers. Using the new MRI method, they found increased iron in several deep brain areas of people with MS, but not in the volunteers.

This means that iron could be a useful biomarker, helping us understand the MS inflammation process. It might also be a useful marker of disease progression.

However, whether there is a definite iron accumulation in specific brain areas has to be further assessed in a larger number of patients.

Read the full article



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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

WELCOME to Stu's Views and MS News_ updated December 2014

WELCOME to Stu's Views and MS News

Key-Note: Our live MS educational seminars average 67 people per educational program. SINCE our first program in February 2010, we have hosted more than 120 educational programs. Most locations are in Florida and we have now added educational programs in Georgia, Alabama, North & South Carolina and soon to be going to other States as well.

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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Legal 'E-spliff' (e-Joint) helps relieve pain of MS and cancer patients - without the cannabis high

  • Legal 'electronic joint' developed to help ailments eased by cannabis
  • It will help calm, relax and ease people's pain, but will not give a 'high'  
  • This is because it contains cannabidiol (CBD) which acts as a painkiller
  • Does not contain psychoactive ingredient THC which gives a 'high'
  • Product will be available to patients in France from January 2015 


A legal 'electronic joint’ to help patients with conditions that are eased by cannabis will go on sale in France next month.

The firm behind the e-joint, called KanaVape, claims it will provide all the relaxing and pain-killing effects of marijuana, without the high.

The product has been engineered to contain cannabidiol (CBD), a compound in cannabis which has therapeutic uses as a painkiller.

But, crucially, the product does not contain THC, another psychoactive compound found in cannabis, which causes the ‘high’.

An 'electronic joint' made from hemp plants is being developed by a French manufacturer. It claims the e-joint, called KanaVape, will provide all the relaxing and painkilling effects of marijuana, without the high, as it does not contain the psychoactive ingredient THC


An 'electronic joint' made from hemp plants is being developed by a French manufacturer. It claims the e-joint, called KanaVape, will provide all the relaxing and painkilling effects of marijuana, without the high, as it does not contain the psychoactive ingredient THC

‘KanaVape brings you many of the benefits of cannabinoids without the psychotic effect of THC’, its makers claim, writing on their website.

Cannabis-derived drugs such as Sativex are already used in the U.S., UK and other European countries to treat the pain associated with multiple sclerosis and cancer.
Two other cannabis-derived drugs, Cesamet and Marinol, are also used in Canada and the U.S. to treat the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy and AIDS-related anorexia.

The founders of KanaVape, Antonin Cohen, a start up entrepreneur and Sebastian Beguerie, an agricultural engineer, spent two years extracting legal cannabinoids and developing the product, VICE News reports.

It is made from the hemp version of the plant, grown legally in France, which contains more CBD and only 0.2 per cent THC, which is not enough for recreational users of cannabis.
Mr Cohen, who previously worked in start-up companies in the U.S. where he said it was possible to earn a ‘comfortable salary’, said he quit his job and set up KanaVape as he wanted to help people suffering conditions that could be eased by marijuana.

He realised many people in France suffer from cancer or MS, and said it was an ‘injustice’ they could not use cannabis to ease their pain.

He said: ‘One of them said "Cannabis plant helps me to fight against my illness, however, the legislation that I have to put myself in situations of illegality. I therefore cannot provide myself with cannabis legally, I cannot find quality cannabis.”

‘We sell this product in France for the sick, a harmless molecule is sued and cannot be accused of marketing a product for recreational use. There is no high in it.’





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Sunday, December 14, 2014

How Will / Might, MS Affect Your Career?

Two Professionals Answer FAQs About Coping


You’ve found out that you have MS, and there’s so much to consider and assess – from what your priorities are to what lifestyle changes you need to make. One of them may be your career. What happens when symptoms of multiple sclerosis lead to job loss or early retirement? 

Psychotherapist Allison Shadday and attorney Jeffrey Gingold adjusted their lives and goals after MS changed their careers. Here, they share their knowledge as well as their personal experiences about moving on.


What do you do if MS forces you to leave your job? 

Allison: One of the most difficult challenges you may ever face is the loss of your job due to MS. It is critical that you acknowledge your feelings and grieve, if necessary. Seek out the support of others who understand what you are going through, such as a local support group or an online forum. 

While change is difficult, it is also important for you to be proactive during this transitional period to avoid feelings of victimization or hopelessness. 

read more






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Expert Advice for Reducing Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

MS Help for 5 Common Problems



The nerve disorder multiple sclerosis brings several unfortunate side effects, from depression to bladder control problems. But MS help is available. Learn how to treat these MS symptoms and live a more fulfilling life...
Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that attacks the central nervous system. An overactive immune system causes inflammation, which damages or destroys myelin, the fatty sheath that insulates nerves.

When that happens, “nerves can’t talk to each other – they can’t exchange signals from one neuron to the next,” explains Rodrigo Rodriguez Jr., M.D., a neurologist with Kaiser Permanente’s Bellflower Medical Center near Los Angeles.

As a result, MS patients may face a long list of nerve-related symptoms: pain or numbness, mobility problems, bladder dysfunction, vision changes, cognitive and emotional issues, dizziness and fatigue.

MS affects about 400,000 people in the U.S., and most are women, according to the National MS Society. The average patient is diagnosed in her 30s or 40s, Dr. Rodriguez says.

The condition is incurable, but the sooner drug therapy treatment begins, the better a patient will do over time, he notes.

The most commonly used medications for MS, known as disease-modifying agents, help “control the degree of inflammation and the rate of inflammatory attacks,” he says. “If these first-line agents don’t work, there are other medications that may be more aggressive in controlling inflammation.”
Untreated, the condition can lead to physical disability.




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Courtney Galiano Won’t Stop Dancing for Multiple Sclerosis

Watch Courtney here 




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What role do you think vitamin D plays in MS?




What is vitamin D's role in multiple sclerosis? Four experts gave us their thoughts: Nancy L. Sicotte, MD, of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles; Peter Riskind, MD, PhD, of University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Mass.; Aaron Miller, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine and Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City; and Dennis Bourdette, MD, of Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. They agreed that the epidemiological evidence for an influence is indisputable, but whether supplements make a difference is still up in the air.

Learn more - WATCH this video presentation




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What is the best way to measure disability in MS?


What is the best way to measure disability progression in multiple sclerosis patients? Two specialists took on the question: William Tyor, MD, of Emory University in Atlanta and co-director of the Emory MS Center, and Jerome Graber, MD, MPH, of Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, N.Y. They recommended a variety of tools including standardized scales, MRI scans, and clinical judgment.




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What's the most underrecognized and undertreated aspect of MS?



What are the most under-recognized and undertreated aspects of multiple sclerosis? Three prominent MS specialists share their thoughts: John Corboy, MD, of the University of Colorado in Denver; Florian Thomas, MD, PhD, of St. Louis University; and Rock Heyman, MD, of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Sleep disruption was a common theme, but bladder problems and cognitive impairment were named as well.

Watch this presentation here





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MS in the News: What is the role of MRI is both diagnosing MS and following the course of the disease?

Dec 12, 2014




What is the role of MRI in both diagnosing multiple sclerosis and following the course of the disease? That's the question we posed to two prominent MS specialists: John Corboy, MD, of the University of Colorado in Denver, and Jerry S. Wolinsky, MD, of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. They agreed that this imaging method has revolutionized the management of MS, both at onset and during its subsequent progression.
Click to Watch Video 






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What are the most promising approaches to treating progressive MS?



Progressive multiple sclerosis represents a significant management challenge, so we asked three well-known researchers and clinicians to share their thoughts on the "best" treatment regimen: Stuart D. Cook, MD, of Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School in Newark; Tanuja Chitnis, MD, of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston; and Robert Fox, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic's Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis. They noted that drugs currently approved for relapsing-remitting MS may also hold promise for progressive disease, but a host of new treatment approaches are in the works, too.

Watch this video presentation found here:
http://www.medpagetoday.com/HOTTOPICSMultipleSclerosis/Neurology/GeneralNeurology-Videos/944


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UK News - Tributes paid to MS campaigner Glen


By Harriet Ernstsons Thursday 11 December 2014 Updated: 12/12 09:15
Latest News
Buy photos » Pictured is the late Glen Roberts.
A MUCH-LOVED fund-raiser dedicated to promoting awareness of the condition he suffered from has passed away aged just 52.
Glen Roberts featured in the pages of the Standard last year after deciding to raise awareness of multiple sclerosis by playing 60 games of golf in 60 days.
He raised almost £2,500 for the MS Society and also highlighted the lack of disabled facilities at some golf courses.
Mr Roberts was first diagnosed eight years ago but continued playing football for a time as well as golf. He also worked at Tesco, most recently at the Express store in Lodge Park but before that in the former store in the Kingfisher Centre and in Knowle.
The Leeds United fan lived in Oakenshaw but originally came from Birmingham and is survived by his partner, children and grandchildren. His funeral will take place in the city on December 22.
His long-standing friend Chris Heath, who met Mr Roberts over 20 years ago when they both worked in the Kingfisher Tesco store, said: “He was a brilliant guy, always funny and always smiling. He was a warm character who was loved by everybody and loved life.
“He carried on playing football when he was diagnosed with MS for a while. He was determined not to let it beat him and he was never one to use his disability as an excuse.
“He will be sadly missed by everyone who knew him particularly his close friends and family.”


Read more: Tributes paid to MS campaigner Glen | Redditch Standard 



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The MS World to recognize people like Glen, who Fight for them and who bring them knowledge ---

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