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CHAMPIONS TACKLING MS - AWARDS Dinner, Honoring Aaron Boster, MD and Jon e. Glaser, DDS - now open for registration. Visit www.events.msvn.org

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Travel agent catering to disability needs, now partnering with MS Views and News


                                                                  
  

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New Smyrna Beach Resident JUDY ZERCHER Joins Cruises Inc.®
As Independent Vacation Specialist

Judy is now partnering with MS Views and News, guaranteeing that with each booking, a percentage will be given-back to MS Views and News as a charitable gift


Certification Received After Completing Intensive Training Program

New Smyrna Beach, Fl. August 1,2016 – Judy Zercher recently completed an intensive training program to become a certified Cruises Inc.® Independent Vacation Specialist in (Central Florida), giving her access to the best cruise and land vacation deals and exclusive, elite product and service offerings. 

“I am here to create the vacation of your dreams!,” said Zercher, a Cruises Inc. vacation specialist. My true passion lies in Travel. Let me share my knowledge and experiences with you. I will take care of each and every detail for you.

To complete the certification program, Zercher participated in an in-depth training and workshops including sales and marketing seminars; product briefings by major cruise lines; and hands-on computer systems orientation introducing new agents to Cruise Control, a proprietary customer relationship manager, sales reporting and reservation system. I am working with Special Needs Groups in order to assist persons with disabilities so they can travel more frequently.

Consumers can browse Judy’s brand new website (www.JZercher.cruisesinc.com), complete with a live booking search engine, or contact her for expert, personalized guidance in planning memorable vacations.   

About Cruises Inc.®  
Cruises Inc. ® is the original work-from-home travel business opportunity with independent affiliates nationwide since 1982. As part of World Travel Holdings, the world’s largest seller of cruise vacations and an award-winning leisure travel company, Cruises Inc. affiliates are able to sell vacation packages from the comfort of their home. Cruises Inc. provides full training and ongoing support, along with low-cost marketing programs, websites, and innovative technology to position its affiliates for success.  For more information on Cruises Inc., visit  www.JZercher.cruisesinc.com     


For more information or to book a dream vacation, please call Judy at 321-666-5989 or visit www.JZercher.cruisesinc.com    

Hours of operation are 7 days a week from 7am to 10pm


Media Contact:
Judy Zercher
321-666-5989
jzercher@cruisesinc.com 







Thursday, September 22, 2016

Aphasia: The disorder that makes you lose your words - Awesome information about Communication


                                                                  
  
information on this subject was sent from: Cherie C. Binns RN BS MSCN


Published on Sep 15, 2016

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Click the above box to learn of this language communication problem

Language is an essential part of our lives that we often take for granted. But, if the delicate web of language networks in your brain became disrupted by stroke, illness, or trauma, you could find yourself truly at a loss for words. Susan Wortman-Jutt details a disorder called aphasia, which can impair all aspects of communication.

Lesson by Susan Wortman-Jutt, animation by TED-Ed.


So, what did you think about this video about Aphasia?
Respond  by using our comments link showing below




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Painsomnia: An Exhausting Problem


                                                                  
  

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Profile photo of Devin Garlit
 
One of the most commonly reported symptoms of multiple sclerosis is fatigue. So it’s no surprise that those suffering with MS may hear that they need to get some rest. Indeed, many suffering from MS will certainly try to get some rest and will end up failing miserably at that endeavor because of what I like to call “Painsomnia”. Painsomnia is the inability to sleep or rest because your body is in pain. It’s something that affects a large number of those with chronic illness, myself included, and it can make the normal fatigue we suffer from even more unbearable.
Painsomnia: An Exhausting Problem
There is a popular meme that is often distributed on social media that reads that “It takes people with MS five times more energy than people without MS to complete a simple task”. I don’t know if that is scientifically accurate but I can certainly attest to it feeling that way. Life with MS is draining! On top of the fatigue (which feels like trying to go through life while constantly swimming in quicksand), everything seems to exhaust me much quicker than it did prior to getting this disease. I was once a ball of energy that seemingly never needed rest or sleep. These days, I’m the opposite of that. I grind to a halt fairly quickly, faster if the weather is warm.
The thing with MS fatigue is that most of the time, no amount of sleep is going to help. You’ll still have to slug through many days and fight through it as best you can. However, that fatigue is made exponentially worse when you can’t get a good night’s sleep. To really survive that crushing fatigue, you need a good foundation of rest that is, unfortunately, very hard to get because of the MS-related pain that many of us experience.
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I Better Do it Now Before I Can’t


                                                                  
  

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Profile photo of Matt Allen G
 
You wake up at a decent time before your alarm goes off (if you even still set one) and you sit up; no pain, not so dizzy, legs are not so tight, no nausea or you didn’t wake up feeling like you have not slept in a week. “Today is going to be agood day” you think, so better make the most of it since these days are far and few between! You get up and start thinking of all the things you want to get done, things that have needed to get done but just been backing up for weeks. Well today is the day you get caught up, you are going to get so much done! It’s almost exciting in a way, the idea of being productive for a change! Sound familiar?
You make coffee, clean the kitchen, throw a load of laundry in the wash, vacuum the house, finally sweep the patio for the first time in like a year and a few other chores and little projects you have been meaning to do but always end upnot doing because… well… MS, that’s why. So you are on a roll, today was such a productive day! You got more done in one day than you typically get done in a week! Maybe you should slow it down just a bit (you think) but what if you physically can’t do this stuff tomorrow? Better do it while you can right? Either way, you feel really good about yourself! Then you wake up the next day; you really don’t feel good. You overdid it… Sound familiar?
So many of us (people with MS) do this (or so I have gathered from talking to people) and I am so guilty of it myself. On a day that I feel good (by which I mean not as horrible) I tend to want to get as much done as possible because “what if tomorrow I lose the ability to do it? Then I will wish I had” but this starts a vicious circle; you want to get all this stuff done because you are worried that “tomorrow” you won’t be able to and then because you overdid it you pushed yourself into a flare and now you actually can’t do those things! But it’s ok, because when you are feeling better you are going to get so much done! Oh… wait… circle…
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Stress/Anxiety & MS


                                                                  
  

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Profile photo of Ashley Ringstaff
 
Now, I don’t know about everyone else… but prior to my diagnosis, I didn’t feel nearly as ‘overwhelmed’ as I do now. Life in general is stressful, of course… family, friends, work… it all can lead to stress at some point. So what’s the big difference with how ‘normal people’ are stressed out… and when an MS patient is stressed out/has anxiety? Well, I’m going to share my 2 cents on that.
So, let me just say that I don’t deal with heavy stress/anxiety 24/7, but at times it can feel like I do. Now, what the big difference in being stressed having a chronic illness, like MS…. And being stressed out while being ‘healthy’, so to say.
When I was first diagnosed, I was told that there are certain ‘triggers’ for MS that can make your MS flare-up and/or make your symptoms worse. Those three triggers I was told were: Extreme Heat, Extreme Cold, and Extreme Stress… When I first heard this, I was like “Great… I live in Central Texas and I’m a mother of two boys…” Now I said that in a joking matter, because I didn’t fully understand just how much stress could affect my symptoms, etc. Click here for a list of triggers. They are different from what I stated, but wanted to share.
What I’ve noticed is that when I deal with ‘extreme heat’ it also causes ‘extreme stress’ for me, so I’m dealing with two of the ‘triggers’ at once. I know there are things out there to help with stress/anxiety and I have been prescribed medication to take if needed, but I’m already on SO MUCH medicine, why would I want to take MORE?
So, back to what I was saying… I’m thinking to myself, okay I need to avoid those extremes, obviously… but I didn’t know how much more ‘sensitive’ I would be to those factors as well. It seems that now a days, I become stressed easily, compared to like 10 years ago… I get that it comes with life, but it’s hard to explain. I feel like I have NO CONTROL over my stress/anxiety at times, and when I get like that, it’s hard to think clearly to calm myself down.


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Paying the MS Tax: The day after being active


                                                                  
  

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Profile photo of Devin Garlit
 
It’s time for me to talk about a pretty common occurrence in my life, those times when I have to “pay the MS Tax”. That’s what I call it anyway. I’m referring to that period of time after I’ve tried to act normal, when I’ve put on my best smile (real or not), bit the bullet, and went out and actually did some sort of activity like most people do. That time when I feel like I’m paying for acting like everyone else. For me, the day after an activity is typically filled with fatigue,pain, and even confusion that necessitates me doing next to nothing. While my experiences certainly don’t reflect everyone with MS (or other chronic illnesses for that matter), I know there are many that do deal with this phenomenon.
Having to have a recovery day (or even days) has become such a necessity to me, that my wife and I have to plan for it. As you can probably surmise, if there are two things happening back to back, that means picking and choosing one over the other. Most times that’ll be whatever comes first because I will always tell myself “oh I can do it all”. I tell myself that and then the day after the first event, reality comes crashing down, I’m stuck in bed or on the couch and looking terrible because once again I’ve had to cancel at the last minute.
Even though logically I know I am going to need down time, I still tend to get this attitude that I can do everything. My wife knows better and will try to talk some sense into me but at the same time, I imagine it’s pretty hard to do that. MS and other chronic illnesses can be such roller coasters. You get lots of crappy lows but when you do feel good, it’s so rare that you want to take on the world and do everything possible. That leads to overdoing it which leads to an even longer recovery time. The process then keeps repeating itself.




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Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Symptoms of MS - the More Common and the Less


                                                                  
  

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Symptoms of MS


Click each to read more





MS symptoms are variable and unpredictable. No two people have exactly the same symptoms, and each person’s symptoms can change or fluctuate over time.

            LEARN MORE  - of the More common and the Less -- 





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Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) - How is NMO different than MS


                                                                  
  

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Overview

Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD), also known as Devic's disease, is an autoimmune disorder in which immune system cells and antibodies primarily attack the optic nerves and the spinal cord. The damage to the optic nerves produces swelling and inflammation that cause pain and loss of vision; the damage to the spinal cord causes weakness or paralysis in the legs or arms, loss of sensation, and problems with bladder and bowel function.
NMO is a relapsing-remitting disease, like MS. During a relapse, new damage to the optic nerves and/or spinal cord can lead to accumulating disability. Unlike MS, there is no progressive phase of this disease. Therefore, preventing attacks is critical to a good long-term outcome.
The cause of NMO is thought to be due to a specific attack on the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel located within the optic nerves and spinal cord. Aquaporins (AQPs) are proteins that transport water across cell membranes. More than 70% of NMO and NMOSD patients test positive for an antibody biomarker in the blood called the NMO-IgG or anti-AQP4 antibody.

Who gets NMO, and when?

There are an estimated 4,000 people with NMO in the United States and a quarter-million people worldwide.
  • NMO is more common in women (greater than 80 percent) than men;
  • NMO occurs in all parts of the world and may be the most common form of demyelinating disease in certain populations such as Africans, Asians and Native Americans.
  • NMO can occur at any age — in children as young as 3 and adults as old as 90 — but appears most often between ages 40 and 50.

How is NMO different from MS?

  • NMO is considered to be an autoimmune disease (where the immune system reacts against healthy tissue as if it was a threat). In NMO, the immune system recognizes the AQP4 water channel as foreign and develops antibodies (NMO-IgG or anti-AQP4 antibody) to attack AQP4 on the surface of astrocytes, which in turn damages the astrocytes. Astrocytes are supportive cells in the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves, and damage to astrocytes is believed to lead to demyelination. No specific immune target has yet been identified in MS, leading many experts to conclude that MS cannot be classified as an autoimmune disease at this time.
  • Symptoms are generally more severe after an NMO attack than an MS attack.
  • NMO rarely has a secondary progressive stage as in MS; disabilities accumulate from repeated acute attacks.
  • NMO is present across the world, especially among non-Caucasians; MS has a higher incidence in temperate climates and Caucasians.
  • Fatigue in NMO is usually an indirect result of the disease (secondary fatigue); in MS, the fatigue is usually the direct result of the disease (primary fatigue).
  • NMO usually affects only the optic nerve and spinal cord at the beginning of the disease, although there may be lesions present in specific areas of the brain. MS typically affects the brain as well as the spinal cord and optic nerve.
  • NMO-IgG (anti-AQP4 antibody) is not found in people with MS but is found in 70 percent of those with NMO.
  • In MS, individual episodes are usually mild; their cumulative effect over time may or not not cause progressive disability. In NMO, the opposite is true and therefore early diagnosis is critical; acute episodes are usually severe and – if untreated – can have devastating, irreversible effects on function.
Some people with NMO also have other autoimmune diseases such as Sjogren’s Syndrome or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE).
SOURCE


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The AAN (American Academy of Neurology) seeks comments from MS Patients and Caregivers


                                                                  
  

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The information found below 


This update to the AAN’s 2002 published guideline on disease modifying therapies (DMTs) for MS reviews the evidence and provides recommendation statements regarding starting, switching, and stopping DMTs for MS.

The AAN seeks comments on the following issues:


Interpretation and inclusion of evidence




Clarity and comprehensiveness of conclusion statements




Clarity and comprehensiveness of recommendations




Comprehensiveness of the document







Comment Period Closes October 8, 2016

The AAN is committed to developing guidelines and evidence-based documents that incorporate patient and caregiver perspectives in a meaningful way. 

In addition to the draft manuscript of the full guideline provided for review, there is an accompanying summary version for lay stakeholders, such as patients, caregivers, and advocates, who wish to provide feedback.

This guideline manuscript draft and accompanying public summary are made available at this time only for the purpose of obtaining comments from professionals and public stakeholders. Because these documents are not in their final, publishable form, we ask that you maintain discretion by refraining from publishing, posting, disseminating, or otherwise releasing the contents of these documents until further notice is received from the AAN.


Click the link showing above, to comment


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MS Treatment Guideline -- MS Patient Comments are being requested


                                                                  
  

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Guidelines Open for Public Comment

Provide your feedback on AAN draft guidelines in development. The AAN is committed to developing guidelines and evidence-based documents that incorporate patient and caregiver perspectives in a meaningful way. In addition to the draft manuscript of the full guideline provided for review, there is an accompanying summary version for lay stakeholders who wish to provide feedback, including patients, their families, caregivers, and patient advocates, to better understand the evidence and conclusions contained in the guideline. 

Review and Comment on Disease-modifying Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis Evidence-based practice guideline


Comment Period Closes October 8
Evidence-based Guideline
The AAN requests comments on the following issues: 
  • Interpretation and inclusion of evidence
  • Clarity and comprehensiveness of conclusion statements
  • Clarity and comprehensiveness of the recommendations
  • Comprehensiveness of the document
Public Summary
The AAN requests comments on the following issues: 
  • Clear explanations of condition, treatment, and supporting scientific evidence
  • Ease of understanding the document
  • Usefulness of the document
  • Completeness of the document











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