Please visit our MS learning channel on Youtube, which provides hundreds of topics from our education programs, that were video-recorded and archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews

joomla ecommerce template -- Scroll left side of this blog for needed resources. Also, use our 'search by topic' tool, to find specific information.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, and procedures for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not intended to be complete or exhaustive, nor is it a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

=================

Friday, October 7, 2016

MS Symposium 2016 - Making Impacts on Health & Wellness - from Birmingham, AL


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



Program Date - August 20, 2016
Location - Birmingham, Alabama


Speakers / Topics: Don McNeal - Former Crimson Tide, Hall of Fame Defensive Back and Two Time Super Bowl NFL Miami Dolphins PLUS a Champion Tackling MS / MS Views and News Patient Advocate
Don discusses Faith as he Tackles MS – keeping him Upright Never giving-in 


and
James H. Rimmer, PhD – Motivational Speaker
 discussing wellness




MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

The Changes in MS Care and Treatments plus new approaches to medication adherence


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail







This video teams two MS experts. Samuel F Hunter, MD, PhD and Amanda Adcock, CRNP, MSCN on topics that will benefit the listeners.


After listening to this video, which can be paused at any time, please then share with others

Thank you 






MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Where You Live Could Be a Risk Factor for Multiple Sclerosis


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



Researchers say developed countries with better sanitation seem to have more cases of multiple sclerosis than other places.


It turns out immigration may increase the risk of developing multiple sclerosis.

That’s what a research team led by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust concluded. 
Environmental factors may be more involved in increasing the chances of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) than previously thought,

More » 


MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

The Benefits of Yoga for People with MS


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail


Experts say yoga can help reduce the chronic pain associated with multiple sclerosis, as well as improve balance and relieve depression. 

More » 





MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

World’s Largest MS Research Conference Highlights Advances in Progressive MS, Gut Microbiome, Managing Symptoms, and New Approaches to Restoring Function


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



September 28, 2016
Results from clinical trials, including new approaches to treating progressive MS, lifestyle and wellness research and myelin repair strategies were among more than 2,000 presentations made at the European Committee for Treatment and Research in MS (ECTRIMS) meeting held in London, England in September.
The world’s largest gathering of MS researchers convened more than 9,000 scientists and clinicians and industry representatives from across the globe, including many National MS Society-funded researchers, meeting and presenting on cutting-edge MS research progress. In addition, the European Rehabilitation in MS network met jointly with ECTRIMS this year. During the conference, the International Progressive MS Alliance announced new investments of over $14 million US dollars to support three Collaborative Network Awards. These international teams were selected to accelerate the pace of research in key areas to speed new therapies for progressive MS.
 
Below are highlights of presentations focused on stopping MS, restoring function, and ending MS forever. In most cases, studies presented are considered preliminary. Many will be analyzed more thoroughly, and likely published in peer-reviewed journals.
 
STOPPING MS

Many presentations showed continued benefits of available therapies and longer-term safety information, as well as more evidence that early and ongoing treatment with a disease-modifying therapy has long-term benefits for controlling disease activity, delaying accumulation of disability, and protecting quality of life.

Siponimod in secondary progressive MS: More details were presented from a 60-month, phase 3 clinical trial of the experimental oral therapy siponimod (Novartis Pharmaceuticals AG) involving 1,651 people with secondary progressive MS. The trial met its primary endpoint, with those on active treatment showing a modest 21% reduced risk of disability progression compared to those on placebo. Secondary endpoints suggested that those on active therapy had 23.4% lower average change in brain volume and reduced MRI-detected lesion volume. The medication showed a similar safety profile to others that work by preventing white blood cells from entering the central nervous system. (Abstract #250)

More details from trial of lipoic acid in secondary progressive MS: Dr. Rebecca Spain and colleagues (Oregon Health & Science University) presented results from a small, controlled clinical trial on the oral anti-oxidant supplement called lipoic acid in people with secondary progressive MS. The lipoic acid group had 66% less brain tissue shrinkage, or atrophy, than the group taking inactive placebo pills. This pilot study suggests potential benefits if they hold up in a larger trial. (Abstract #222)

New results on gut bacteria: Efforts are advancing to pinpoint bacteria in the gut that may drive inflammatory immune system activity in MS and others that can suppress it, which may open the door to novel probiotic or other therapeutic approaches to treating MS.





MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

Physical Activity May Not Prevent MS, Says New Study, But Benefits Those Who Already Live with MS


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



September 30, 2016
Harvard researchers report that there was no association between the risk of developing MS and the amount of physical activity engaged in per week, after reviewing questionnaires submitted by more than 193,000 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Studies. Read more in U.S. News and World Report.

The authors note that the study was not designed to address whether physical activity has benefits for people who already have MS, and emphasize that physical activity should still be recommended for people with MS. Read the paper, published online in Neurology, September 28, 2016

The benefits of exercise for people with MS continue to stack up, as shown in numerous studies. They include:  -- click to  continue



MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

Will Tclena Become A Big Player In Multiple Sclerosis?


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



October 4, 2016

Summary

Data of their lead product will be published any day now.
Competitors failed with their studies in SPMS.
Market cap of only $20 million.
In February 2014 I wrote an article about Opexa Therapeutics (NASDAQ:OPXA). Opexa is a small biotech stock working on their T-cell immunotherapy, Tcelna, which is in development for Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS).
The market cap of Opexa at that time was $45 million. Today the market cap is $22 million. Obviously the stock hasn't performed well...
What's interesting is that Opexa now is on the eve of publishing the Phase IIb results, scheduled for early Q4 2016, of its lead product in its pipeline: Tcelna.
Tclena
According to the company's website,
The lead product in the pipeline is Tcelna. In MS patients, the faulty immune system is not able to prevent the attack of a small sub-population of myelin reactive T-cells (MRTCs). Opexa's strategy is to identify which specific antigens within each individual patient may be targeted by the immune response, and to inject a large therapeutic bolus of attenuated MRTCs back into the patient. Tcelna consists of attenuated antigen specific Myelin Reactive T-cells, and the injection is meant to educate the body's immune system to recognize the similar MRTCs as "foreign" and destroy them.
 

           Continue




MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

The Basics: How to Prevent UTIs


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



How to prevent UTI's 

Watch video on this subject by clicking here





MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS





Why UTIs Are Getting Harder to Treat


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



Watch a video on the subject of this email by clicking here







MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS





NICE Planning to Reject MS Treatment, Zinbryta, in England and Wales


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail


The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the health authority for England and Wales, has decided not to recommendZinbryta (daclizumab) to be available to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients through the country’s health service. The decision came in a first stage of the drug’s review process, and NICE is welcomingfeedback from patient groups, healthcare professionals, and others.
In making this initial decision, NICE reported that issues linked to the clinical and cost-effectiveness models presented by Zinbryta’s developer, Biogen, presented a high degree of uncertainty. Biogen has been asked to submit further evidence.
“The committee concluded that daclizumab was not cost effective for patients without more active disease … [and]  that it had not been presented with robust evidence that daclizumab was cost effective for people with more active disease … Because the committee considered the analyses to be highly uncertain or not relevant to the NHS [National Health System], it invited the company to submit revised analyses,”NICE concluded in its report.




MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS





Pilates: A Good Therapy for MS?


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail




pilates and MS




Have you tried Pilates to improve your mobility?  When my wife and I tried it, a few years ago, I thought that it was sort of like doing yoga stretches using exercise equipment.  It felt good and, for the short time that I did keep it up, Pilates seemed to improve my flexibility, somewhat.
Pilates is a stretching and exercise program focusing on trunk muscles, and there’s plenty of evidence that, in healthy folks, it improves flexibility, balance and muscle endurance.  But not many studies have examined whether people with MS receive the same benefits.  One of them was done by researchers at Izmi University in Turkey and published, last March, in the Journal of Physical Therapy Science.




MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS





Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Pair of proteins found to drive neuroinflammation


                                                                  
  

Study could pave way for development of novel therapeutic approaches for inflammatory diseases


Click here to receive MS news via e-mail

PUBLISHED: 11OCT2016
McGill researchers have identified two proteins that work together to drive neuroinflammation in acute conditions such as microbial or autoimmune encephalitis, and in chronic conditions such as multiple sclerosis. 
In a study published today in Nature Immunology, a team led by Prof. Philippe Gros show that genetic inactivation of this protein pair blocks neuroinflammation and prevents the appearance of disease in animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS). The findings could pave the way for development of novel therapeutic approaches in inflammatory diseases such as MS. 
The study involved a close collaboration among scientists at the McGill Research Centre on Complex Traits, the Montreal Neurological Institute, and the McGill University and Génome Québec Innovation Centre. The researchers found that the pair of proteins -- a deubiquitination enzyme USP15 and a ubiquitin ligase TRIM25 -- appears active both in resident brain cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, and in immune cells that can infiltrate the brain and spinal cord during neuroinflammation. The results indicate that USP15/TRIM25 system regulates a critical pro-inflammatory pathway, known as type I interferon, that initiates and amplifies neuroinflammation. 




MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

Improper criteria use can lead to MS misdiagnosis


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail


9/12/2016
Clinicians and researchers have known for decades that multiple sclerosis misdiagnosis is a problem. The authors of a new study define the nature of medical conditions that lead patients to be misdiagnosed with MS and possible reasons why they are misdiagnosed. They hope the study will encourage better education of clinicians on the proper use of MS diagnostic criteria and on the problem of MS misdiagnosis, and further study of how to recognize patients incorrectly diagnosed with MS.

The study involved 24 MS subspecialist neurologists at Mayo Clinic, University of Vermont, Washington University and Oregon Health and Science University, who identified an incorrect diagnosis of MS in 110 patients. In the study, five primary diagnoses or syndromes were identified in two-thirds of participants as the actual causes of symptoms misidentified as MS: migraine, either alone or in combination with other problems; fibromyalgia; an abnormal MRI with unexplained symptoms; a psychological condition; and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, a disease similar to MS that affects the optic nerves and spinal cord.




MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

Monday, October 3, 2016

New Enzyme Study may be effective in reducing muscle spasticity


                                                                  
  

Click here to receive MS news via e-mail

A new study shows that an enzyme called hyaluronidase may be effective in reducing muscle spasticity resulting from neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis.
The results were published in a study titled “Human Recombinant Hyaluronidase Injections For Upper Limb Muscle Stiffness in Individuals With Cerebral Injury: A Case Series,” in the journal EBioMedicine by a group of researchers from the NYU Langone Medical Center.
Muscle spasticity is a condition characterized by muscle stiffness in one or more muscles and reduced joint movement, which causes pain and disability. This condition is associated with neurological damage caused by disorders that affect the connections between neurons that control muscle movement (motor neurons) and muscles, such as multiple sclerosis, stroke, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, or spinal cord injury.
Read More


MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS

MS More Frequent Among Females Exposed to High Levels of Copper, Study Shows


                                                                  
  









Click here to receive MS news via e-mail



Exposure to heavy metals and being female are associated with a higher incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study conducted by Maria Cristina Monti and colleagues from two Italian universities.
Several studies had already reported that MS is triggered by a combination of genetic susceptibility and exposure to environmental factors.
For the recent study, researchers analyzed the possible association between the incidence of MS and environmental factors like exposure to heavy metals, urbanization, and UV exposure on the people of Sardinia, Italy. They took into account the high incidence of MS in the region and that the area economy had been formerly based on the exploitation of different metals — many mining landfills had been created.
The team collected geochemical samples containing six heavy metals (cobalt, chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc), and proxy data regarding of UV exposure (percentage of the municipal areas exposed to the south) and urbanization (percentage of urban area included in the municipal area), revealed by geographic information system (GIS) processing. Gender, age, municipality of residence, relative concentrations (in parts per million), UV exposure, and percentage of urbanization were collected on each person in the study.
Results indicated an association between copper levels and gender with MS distribution, whereas UV exposure and urbanization showed no significant association with MS distribution. When copper concentration was increased (by 50 ppm), the incidence of MS was nearly three times higher.




MS Views and News
Providing educational information, resources and services for those affected by MS