MS Views and News Be empowered with MS views and news. To receive The MS BEACON e-Newsletter, CLICK HERE - -

Visit our MS learning channel on YouTube, which provides hundreds of MS educational videos presented by MS Experts from across the USA. Archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews -- Also please visit our Social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram . Each providing important information for the MS community. Furthermore, scroll down the left side of this blog to learn from the resources and links.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Friday, December 29, 2017

Clomipramine, an Antidepressant, Shows Potential in Treating Progressive MS in Early Study

December 29, 2017

Clomipramine, an approved antidepressant, shows potential in treating people with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS)  — a disease form with few treatments — by protecting nerves from various processes thought to underly progressive MS, early research shows.
The lab and animal study, which focused on already-approved treatments, was titled “Systematic screening of generic drugs for progressive multiple sclerosis identifies clomipramine as a promising therapeutic” and published in the journal Nature Communications.
A variety of therapies exist for people with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), which is marked by exacerbations or flares. But fewer exist for people with progressive MS, and only one, Ocrevus (ocrelizumab), is approved for those with primary progressive disease. Among reasons for this are the markedly different underlying processes underlying these two types of MS.
“The mechanisms causing damage in progressive MS are not always the same as in relapsing-remitting MS. This is why the latter requires different therapeutic approaches,” Simon Faissner, a researchers with the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Canada and the study’s first author, said a press release.
Progressive MS involves severe aspects of neurodegeneration, accompanied by iron-mediated neurotoxicity, immune cell activity, and oxidative stress. An effective treatment essentially needs to address all these mechanisms.


MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
...............................................................................

Zinbryta Fails to Prevent RRMS from Worsening After Patient Gets Off Tysabri, Case Study Shows

DECEMBER 28, 2017    Patricia Inacio, PhD

Zinbryta (daclizumab) may not be the best follow-up therapy for relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis patients who stop taking Tysabri (natalizumab) for safety reasons, a case study suggests.
An article on the 25-year-old patient’s case, titled “Disease reactivation after switching from natalizumab to daclizumab,” was published in the Journal of Neurology.
Discontining Biogen’s Tysabri leads to many patients’ disease worsening. The question doctors face is what treatment to prescribe after Tysabri. One possibility is Zinbryta.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Union approved it as therapy for active RRMS cases in 2016.  Biogen and AbbVie market the monoclonal antibody, which targets the CD25 protein that scientists have linked to MS.
Researchers studied the 25-year-old patient’s case for clues about whether Zinbryta could benefit MS patients who discontinue Tysabri.
...............................................................................

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis


Watch and Learn from this MS Expert, Aaron Boster, MD educate you




MS Views and News is MAKING an IMPACT for those, affected by Multiple Sclerosis
MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
...............................................................................

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Lifetime Cancer Risk Lower in MS Patients Than General Public, Study Reports

December 26, 2017


People with multiple sclerosis (MS) have a lower overall lifetime risk of cancer relative to a general population matched by area, age, sex and habits like tobacco use and alcohol consumption, new research reports, suggesting this lesser risk might be due to the nature of MS itself or to disease modifying therapies used by patients.

The study, “Decreased prevalence of cancer in patients with multiple sclerosis: A case-control study,” was published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The immune system is known to play a large role in both MS and cancer, leading some scientists to suggest that a disease like MS would modify the risk of cancer.

Some argue that the highly active immune system seen in MS patients works to improve cancer surveillance and decrease cancer risk. But others point to the disease-modifying treatments used by MS patients, particularly immunosuppressives, as increasing cancer risk in this population.

Studies have shown conflicting results, with some indicating a higher cancer risk and others a lower risk in MS patients.But most of these studies do not take into account lifestyle factors associated with cancer development, including alcohol and tobacco use.Lifetime Cancer Risk Lower in MS Patients Than General Public, Study Reports      READ MORE

=======================================================================




MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
...............................................................................

Monday, December 25, 2017

Tysabri-associated Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML)


Discussed by Aaron Boster, MD

What is PML, what causes it, and the risk factors for infection associated with taking Tysabri











MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
...............................................................................

What has Science taught us about Cann@bis and Multiple Sclerosis?

Created by Aaron Boster, MD
December 25, 2017

Dr. B reviews what we have learned from scientific studies as it relates to cann@bis and multiple sclerosis. There is good data that cann@bis does in fact help MS pain and MS spasticity. There is also good data that cann@bis worsens MS cognition. (Importantly people with MS who already have some cognitive impairment appear to be more affected as compared to those who do not already have problems with cognition). This is particularly important given that cognitive impairments and fatigue are the leading causes of loss of work among people with multiple sclerosis.







MS Views and News is MAKING an IMPACT for those, affected by Multiple Sclerosis
SHARE what we provide and get all to opt-in with us, here.

...............................................................................

Sunday, December 24, 2017

Primary Progressive MS: Myths vs. Facts

Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) is a complex disease that varies between individuals. In other words, not everyone will have the same symptoms or experiences. The rates of progression also vary.
The mysteries surrounding PPMS have generated many myths about this condition. This can create a lot of confusion when you’re trying to research multiple sclerosis (MS) and its primary forms. Learn about some of the most common myths about PPMS here, as well as the real facts.

Myth: There will never be a cure for PPMS

Fact: Research is ongoing for medications

As of 2017, MS isn’t curable. Certain medications are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for relapsing-remitting forms of MS, but but most of these don’t seem to work in PPMS. Recently, one new drug, Ocrevus (ocrelizumab), has been approved for PPMS.
This doesn’t mean that there will never be a cure. In fact, research is ongoing in terms of medications for PPMS, as well as possible cures for all forms of MS. Because genetics and environment are thought to contribute to MS development, research is looking into how to prevent some of these variables from affecting adults later in life.

Myth: PPMS primarily occurs in women

Fact: PPMS affects women and men at the same rate

Some forms of MS tend to occur more often in women than men — sometimes three times as much. Yet according to the National MS Society, PPMS seems to affect both women and men equally in number.
Diagnosing PPMS can be difficult, but you shouldn’t assume you have one specific form of MS just because of your sex.

Myth: PPMS is an elderly person’s disease

Fact: The condition may occur before middle age

The onset of PPMS tends to occur later than other forms of MS. However, there seems to be a misconception that it’s an elderly person’s disease. This may be in part due to the onset of disability being associated with age. According to the University of Rochester Medical Center, the average age of onset for PPMS is between 30 and 39 years of age.
Continue reading Myths and Facts about PPMS by clicking here

MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
...............................................................................