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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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Saturday, January 6, 2018

Griffin Hospital needs volunteers for study on MS and insomnia

Griffin Hospital’s Multiple Sclerosis Center and the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (which is also at Griffin Hospital), are enrolling patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic insomnia in a study to determine whether a form of meditation can help combat sleeplessness in these patients.


Griffin Hospital’s Multiple Sclerosis Center and the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (which is also at Griffin Hospital), are enrolling patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic insomnia in a study to determine whether a form of meditation can help combat sleeplessness in these patients. Photo: Craftvision / Getty Images / (c) craftvision  DERBY — In his years of working with multiple sclerosis patients, Dr. Joseph B. Guarnaccia has found many of them also suffer from another condition — insomnia.
“It does have an impact on their quality of life and their ability to handle their disease,” said Guarnaccia, director of the Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Center at Derby’s Griffin Hospital.
To help those grappling with both MS and sleeplessness, Guarnaccia is leading a study to examine whether a form of meditation can ease insomnia in MS patients. The study, a collaboration between the Multiple Sclerosis Center and the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (which is also at Griffin Hospital), is enrolling patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic insomnia through the winter and spring.
Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. Symptoms of MS can include anything from blurred vision and loss of balance to paralysis and blindness. Problems can come and go or get worse over time.


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Human Herpes Virus 6 May Increase Risk of MS, Study Suggests

January 5, 2018 - Iranian researchers have identified another herpes virus that may increase the risk of a person developing multiple sclerosis.
The team identified the human herpesvirus 6, or HHV6, as a potential risk factor for MS through a meta-analysis of several studies.
Scientists have found links between other human herpes viruses and MS, especially the Epstein-Barr virus, also known as human herpesvirus 4.
Recent studies had also suggested a relationship between HHV6 and MS, but the findings have been controversial.
An Iranian team did a meta-analysis of studies published between October 1992 and September 2016 to see if they could shed more light on whether HHV6 and MS are connected. The found 39 studies that they considered suitable for their project.
READ MORE




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Friday, January 5, 2018

David Lyons: My Goal in 2018: Seeing Every Person With MS Active and Fit


I have made it my mission to help everyone with multiple sclerosis get fit and stay fit.
By David Lyons


As we start off a New Year, I want to help motivate and encourage you to start a new you! For those of you who are already pumped up to get in shape, stay in shape, or improve your current fitness level, I applaud your drive to succeed. But there are many who have MS who are not engaged in a fitness program, and there are those who are only applying themselves with a limited effort or who are just not doing it correctly.

I have made it my mission — no, my passion — to help everyone with MS start an exercise regimen, to educate and train them on the proper program that fits their goals, and to see them stick with it.

Now that’s a bold statement! And maybe it’s an impossible one to accomplish, since not every person with MS will follow my advice or take action with me. But nonetheless, this is my vision and my purpose: to help every individual with MS in the world get fit and stay fit!

So how can I possibly do this, you ask?

David Lyons supervises the workout of a client with MS.


Where to Find Me and Other MS Fitness Experts

First and foremost I try to reach as many as you as possible through social media and help to get great advice to you in conquering MS through fitness at our Facebook group,  MS Fitness Challenge Gym. This is a platform for us to share fitness and nutrition tips  and information. It is a group managed by trainers, nutrition counselors, and fitness professionals who either have MS themselves or have worked with MS for many years.

CLICK HERE to READ MORE




MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
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Thursday, January 4, 2018

Evolution, trends, outcomes, and economics of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in severe autoimmune diseases.


Snowden JA, et al. Blood Adv. 2017.

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has evolved for >20 years as a specific treatment of patients with autoimmune disease (AD). Using European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry data, we summarized trends and identified factors influencing activity and outcomes in patients with AD undergoing first autologous HSCT (n = 1951; median age, 37 years [3-76]) and allogeneic HSCT (n = 105; median age, 12 years [<1-62]) in 247 centers in 40 countries from 1994 to 2015. Predominant countries of activity were Italy, Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Spain, France, and Australia. National activity correlated with the Human Development Index (P = .006). For autologous HSCT, outcomes varied significantly between diseases. There was chronological improvement in progression-free survival (PFS, P < 10-5), relapse/progression (P < 10-5), and nonrelapse mortality (P = .01). Health care expenditure was associated with improved outcomes in systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis (MS). On multivariate analysis selecting adults for MS, systemic sclerosis, and Crohn disease, better PFS was associated with experience (≥23 transplants for AD, P = .001), learning (time from first HSCT for AD ≥6 years, P = .01), and Joint Accreditation Committee of the International Society for Cellular Therapy and European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation accreditation status (P = .02). Despite improved survival over time (P = .02), allogeneic HSCT use remained low and largely restricted to pediatric practice. Autologous HSCT has evolved into a treatment modality to be considered alongside other modern therapies in severe AD. Center experience, accreditation, interspecialty networking, and national socioeconomic factors are relevant for health service delivery of HSCT in AD.

PMID

 29296926 [PubMed] 

PMCID

 PMC5745133

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/29296926/?i=6&from=multiple%20sclerosis 



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5 Natural Remedies for MS Nerve Pain in the Legs and Feet

a Re-post from Healthline.com



There are many medical conditions that can cause nerve pain in the legs and feet, including chronic ones like multiple sclerosis (MS). Pain, unfortunately, is par for the course with MS. But with the right treatments — both natural and prescription — you’ll likely be able to find some relief.

Why MS causes pain

The nerve pain that people with MS experience can be caused directly by the disease or by related illnesses, such as fibromyalgia and arthritis.
When it’s a direct result of MS, the mechanism is through nerve damage. MS attacks the myelin sheath. This is the natural protective covering of your brain, spinal cord, and entire nervous system. Coupled with the development of lesions and plaques in the nervous system, this can lead to pain in the legs and throughout the body.
MS also makes movement and gait, or the process of walking, difficult. As nerve damage worsens, people with MS are likely to experience stiffness and aching.
MS pain can vary from dull and sporadic to stabbing, severe, and constant. In severe cases, small triggers like a cold breeze or uncomfortable clothing can cause pain in people with MS

At-home solutions

Managing pain usually involves a combination of multiple techniques, including prescribed medications and home remedies. Some of the following treatments may aid in pain relief: 

1. Warm compress or warm bath

According to Barbara Rodgers, a nutrition consultant who also has MS, too much heat can exacerbate symptoms. A hot bath or hot compress may make matters worse. However, warm compresses can provide comfort and relief.

2. Massage 

A massage can serve several purposes, stimulating blood flow in the body and gently relieving muscle pain and tension while promoting relaxation and a sense of well-being. For people with MS, this relaxation is important and often difficult to come by.

3. Therapy

According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, stress, depression, and anxiety can make people with MS more likely to report pain. Managing these stressors and psychological conditions can reduce the pain they once aggravated. Support groups and working with a therapist are just a few methods to lessen these psychological factors.

4. Nutritional supplements

Nerve pain can be caused and exacerbated by certain deficiencies. Your doctor can help you determine if you may be deficient in:
Your doctor can assess whether a supplement would be right for you. Rodgers also suggests Wobenzym, a supplement that’s intended to help stiffness and soreness.

5. Dietary changes

Frequently, pain and illness are related to an unhealthy diet. Rodgers says that people with MS should take a critical look at what they’re eating and consider eliminating common culprits when it comes to nerve pain. These might include corn, dairy, gluten, soy, and sugar.

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Tuesday, January 2, 2018

• MS Patients’ Handwriting Ability Correlates with Movement, Sensory and Cognitive Impairment, Study Shows

January 2, 2018
MS handwriting studyA deterioration in multiple sclerosis patients' handwriting aligns with drops in their movement, sensory and cognitive skills, a study reports.
MS includes loss of hand dexterity and finger movement control. This affects a patient's capacity to manipulate objects and coordinate hand movement, skills needed in handwriting.
Previous studies have shown that MS patients had less handwriting rhythm and control than healthy people.
This time researchers decided to compare the handwriting movements of both MS patients and healthy volunteers.
The research involved 19 MS patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls. The team asked participants to write a specific sentence on a digitizing tablet.
They discovered that the way MS patients wrote was much different than those of the controls. The patients took a lot longer to write each word and to achieve spacing between words. This led to them taking a much longer time overall to write a sentence than healthy people.
In addition, analysis of handwriting strokes showed that MS patients' writing wasn't as smooth as that of healthy people.
Researchers also found a correlation between patients’ movement abilities and cognitive status on the one hand and their handwriting ability on the other.
The team said it believed “these findings might be very useful when planning rehabilitative task-oriented interventions focused on handwriting abilities.”

In fact, rehabilitation specialists should consider evaluating “both the motor movement and the cognitive status of PwMS [patients with MS] in order to tailor the intervention."



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Monday, January 1, 2018

Canadian Study Finds Tanning Salon Sunbeds Effective for Raising Vitamin D Levels

TORONTO, Ont (November  2017) – Sunbeds with a UVB component similar to solar summer sunshine may provide an effective alternate vitamin D source during winter months, according to a new Canadian study just published in the journal Dermato Endocrinology.
People who use tanning salons, specifically sunbeds that have UVB during the winter reach physiological blood levels (>100 nmol/L) of vitamin D, the study reported. It found that participants who used typical sunbeds emitting UVB rays in the range equivalent to outdoor summer sunshine increased their vitamin D blood levels on average by 42 nmol/L. This was achieved using standard tanning exposure schedules on salon sunbeds.
“Sunbeds enable exposure to nearly 100% of skin in a controlled manner which amplifies their effectiveness for vitamin D production,” said Dr. Samantha Kimball, lead author and research director at Pure North S’Energy Foundation in Calgary, AB. “We found that you can effectively raise your vitamin D levels into the desired range without burning and following Health Canada’s recommendations. But there are risks to any type of UV exposure, whether from the sun or sunbed.”
Researchers used sunbeds located in professional sunbed salons in Canada. Previous studies showing that sunbeds trigger vitamin D production in the skin used the same kind of sunbeds, but they were conducted in laboratories. Most sunbeds emit both UVB and UVA light – similar to summer sunlight in Canada. The UV portion of summer sunshine at noon in most of Canada is about 95% UVA and 5% UVB.
Ultraviolet-B (UVB) sun exposure in summer converts cholesterol in your skin to pre-vitamin D. Wintertime sun exposure at northern latitudes in Canada (above 44⁰N) does not contain sufficient UVB to stimulate vitamin D synthesis because of the angle of the sun. Most evolutionary biologists believe skin colour evolution occurred when fairer-skinned cultures migrated further from the equator so the skin would more efficiently produce vitamin D in light-deprived parts of the world.
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MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
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Primer for those Impacted by Multiple Sclerosis

December 30,  2017
By:  Aaron Boster MD

We've created a 2 minute primer to help those impacted by Multiple Sclerosis. If you're newly diagnosed, have a loved one with MS, or searching the inter-webs for answers, then please consider watching our meme-based educational video!


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MS Views and News provides beneficial Multiple Sclerosis education, information, resources and services. 
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