MS Views and News Be empowered with MS views and news. To receive The MS BEACON e-Newsletter, CLICK HERE - -

Please visit our MS learning channel on YouTube, which provides hundreds of MS videos presented by MS Experts across the USA, from many of our recorded education programs. Archived here: www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews -- Additionally, please visit our Social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Important Resources for the MS community are found on the left side of this blog.

Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Saturday, April 14, 2018

Video: What is a Multiple Sclerosis Relapse (attack)?


SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews



 Produced by: Aaron Boster, MD

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Video: Multiple Sclerosis Terminology


Produced by Aaron Boster, MD


SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Friday, April 13, 2018

30 MINUTE YOGA SEQUENCE TO IMPROVE STABILITY


Yoga can be a fantastic, low-impact exercise for people with multiple sclerosis. Its relaxed nature allows us to unwind both physically and mentally at our own pace. It is particularly beneficial for people who want to exercise but prefer a less intense approach than an outside run or a gym session.
Véronique Gauthier-Simmons has practiced yoga for almost two decades to help with her relapsing-remitting MS. She was also a presenter at the 7 Steps To Overcoming MS event at the AMEX Stadium in Brighton in October 2017.
In her two-part video below she shows how yoga can help improve stability and relax the mind. All you need before starting is a blanket, a quiet space and half an hour of your day.
Watch a video and read more, by clicking here



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

MS Views and News is MAKING an IMPACT for those, affected by Multiple Sclerosis
MS Views and News provides Multiple Sclerosis education, information, 
resources and services that will benefit many affected by MS. 


SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

This Multiple Sclerosis Treatment (CLADRIBINE) Just Got Approved in United Arab Emirates



According to a story from PR Newswire, the science and tech company Merck recently announced that Mavenclad (cladribine) was recently approved for public use by the UAE Ministry of Health and Prevention for the treatment of high activity relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in adult patients. This is the first time that the treatment has been approved in the Middle Eastern/African region. The Ministry has recently implemented an accelerated approval process so that critical treatments such as Mavenclad will be available to the public faster.
Multiple sclerosis is a condition in which the myelin sheath, an insulating cover that surrounds neurons, is damaged. The damage to the myelin sheath disrupts the ability of neurons to signal to one another. This problem can result in a host of symptoms, such as changes to sensation, loss of coordination, double vision, blindness in one eye, trouble walking, problems with speech and swallowing, pain, digestive problems, and fatigue. Mental health issues such as depression may also occur. Multiple sclerosis occurs as a progressively worsening experience of symptoms or episodes of pronounced symptoms followed by periods with almost none. Although it has been classed as an autoimmune disease, what causes the immune response is unknown. Multiple sclerosis patients generally live five to ten years shorter than the general population. To learn more about multiple sclerosis, click: www.msvn.org 
Mavenclad is a short term, orally administered treatment that provides symptoms relief for a maximum of four years; the drug works by regulating the activity of B and T lymphocytes but does not result in continuous suppression of the immune system. However, patients may become temporarily more susceptible to infection while using Mavenclad. The drug was first approved for use in the EU in August 2017; however, the United States has yet to approve the medication.

Compared to many MS treatments, Mavenclad represents a convenient treatment option that does not carry many of the more dangerous side effects that other treatments can. The availability of the drug in UAE should be considered of major significance for patients there, who will now have access to a cutting edge treatment that is less likely to negatively affect their quality of life.





SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Vitamin D supplementation recommended in all children, teens

 – Vitamin D deficiency is common among children and adolescents, particularly those with chronic disease, Catherine Gordon, MD, said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Yet the precise definition of vitamin D deficiency and the healthy threshold for vitamin D levels lack universally agreed-upon standards. Generally speaking, levels of at least 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L) appear safe and reasonable for children with chronic disease, and additional research is confirming whether this range is appropriate for other pediatric groups as well. Although too much vitamin D can lead to hypercalcemia, vitamin D intoxication is very rare, said Dr. Gordon, director of the division of adolescents and transition medicine at the University of Cincinnati.
Vitamin D supplements©Kaspri/Fotolia.com
Those at the highest risk for vitamin D deficiency include people who eat an inadequate diet and/or get inadequate exposure to sunlight, including those who live in high latitudes or use sunscreen frequently. Obesity, malabsorption issues, taking anticonvulsants, and having a dark skin pigmentation are additional risk factors. Malabsorption can result from conditions such as celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, or kidney problems.
Severe vitamin D deficiency can lead to rickets, when bones have insufficient calcium and phosphorus levels, resulting in bone softening and weakening before growth plates close. If not treated with vitamin D and calcium supplementation, rickets becomes osteomalacia after the growth plates close.

CONTINUE READING






SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Why NICE Didn't Approve Roche's Ocrevus for Multiple Sclerosis

By Sarah Collins
Apr 12, 2018 | 9:38 AM

Overview
On April 5, 2018, Roche’s (RHHBY) MS (multiple sclerosis) drug Ocrevus was denied recommendation by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) in England for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS in adults.

Ocrevus was approved by the FDA for the treatment of adult patients suffering from relapsing-remitting MS or a primary progressive form of MS, which is more difficult to treat. The drug is the only approved therapy for the primary progressive form of MS and has given stiff competition to Merck’s (MRK) market-leading MS drug Rebif. Roche offered the drug at a 25% discount to Rebif. It is expected that Roche might consider a similar strategy in England and reduce the price.


Why NICE Didn't Approve Roche’s Ocrevus for Multiple Sclerosis

On April 5, 2018, Roche’s (RHHBY) MS (multiple sclerosis) drug Ocrevus was denied recommendation by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) in England for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS in adults.
Ocrevus was approved by the FDA for the treatment of adult patients suffering from relapsing-remitting MS or a primary progressive form of MS, which is more difficult to treat. The drug is the only approved therapy for the primary progressive form of MS and has given stiff competition to Merck’s (MRK) market-leading MS drug Rebif. Roche offered the drug at a 25% discount to Rebif. It is expected that Roche might consider a similar strategy in England and reduce the price.
NICE considered Ocrevus price unacceptable

According to the guidance provided by NICE, which rejected Roche’s Ocrevus 
recommendation, “The most plausible cost-effectiveness estimates for ocrelizumab compared with all relevant comparators are higher than those NICE normally considers an acceptable use of NHS resources.”

Ocrevus, however, reported strong results from its Phase 3 trial of Ocrevus for MS treatment and has captured one of the leading market positions in the competitive MS space.

According to a recent analysis, which included results from two Phase 3 clinical trials, OPERA I and OPERA II, Roche’s Ocrevus was found to be more effective than Merck’s Rebif. However, analysts recommended long-term studies to determine if Ocrevus has long-lasting benefits over Rebif.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::




SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Searching for MS Genes


Research suggests that MS occurs in individuals and in families whose genes make them susceptible to developing the disease, and that many genes contribute to MS susceptibility.


Moving MS Genetics Forward To a World Free of MS

Ending MS can’t come fast enough and one key to ending MS is our focus on genes that help make people susceptible to developing MS. Research suggests that MS occurs in individuals and in families whose genes make them susceptible, and that many genes contribute to MS susceptibility. In addition, individuals who are genetically at risk must encounter some other triggering factor or factors in their environment to actually develop MS.
Pinpointing and understanding “MS genes” is important because
• it will provide key information regarding the cause of the disease and therefore how to prevent it
• genes that are associated with MS may be targets for the development of new therapies
• if we could identify those people who have a strong genetic predisposition to the disease, we might be able to intervene at its earliest stages or prevent MS.

Ending MS: Making it happen

Click here to continue reading






SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Frequently Asked Questions: Generic and Biosimilar - Medications

What is a generic medication?

generic medication is a product that is equivalent to a brand-name medication whose patent protections have expired.

As part of the generic medication approval process, the FDA requires that generics have the same active ingredients, strength, dosage and mode of administration as the brand-name medication, and that they are manufactured according to federal quality control regulations.

Manufacturers are required to show that the generic medication delivers the same amount of active ingredients to the person’s bloodstream in the same amount of time as the brand-name product—referred to as bioequivalence

What about generic therapies for MS?






SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

What Is Glatiramer Acetate / What Is Mylan’s Glatiramer Acetate Injection?

Glatiramer acetate is a prescription medication that can be injected subcutaneously to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).
Every dose of glatiramer acetate is composed of a complex mixture of polypeptides containing four naturally occurring amino acids:
  • L-glutamate
  • L-lysine

  • L-alanine
  • L-tyrosine

Some scientists think that MS may result when the body’s immune system attacks the myelin sheath that surrounds and protects nerve cell axons.1 Although the mechanism of action of glatiramer acetate is not fully known, there is evidence that it may help reduce MS relapses by interrupting this immune system attack

What Is Mylan’s Glatiramer Acetate Injection?

Mylan’s Glatiramer Acetate Injection is an FDA-approved therapeutic equivalent to Copaxone® (glatiramer acetate injection), available in two dose strengths.
  • 40 mg/mL for 3-times-a-week injection
  • 20 mg/mL for once-daily injection

This means that Mylan’s Glatiramer Acetate Injection may be substitued for the equivalent dose of Copaxone® and may be expected to have a comparable safety and efficacy profile.
Like Copaxone®, Mylan’s Glatiramer Acetate Injection is available by prescription only, for injection under the skin

SOURCE

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Video: The MS Improvement Project

Did you know that some MS patients manifest IMPROVEMENTS to disability? It’s true, and I’m amazed that no one seems to talk about it. Well, we’re going to talk about it in THIS video! In the modern era of 2018, with our highly effective disease modifying therapies, we now see large minorities of patients (upwards of 41% of patients in some clinical trials) who manifest “confirmed disability improvements” or CDI (I’ll post a link to a CDI video I did a few months back below). CDI is defined as IMPROVING on the disability scale we use in MS (called the expanded disability status scale, or EDSS) by at least 1 point and maintained for at least 6 months. WOW! Several symptomatic therapies IMPROVE functional outcomes in MS. In this video we touch on treatments for heat sensitivity and motor fatigue, pathologic fatigue and cognitive impairments, severe spasticity and depression. There is evidence amongst all these treatment that they can improved function in some patients. I share 3 patient anecdotes from my clinic of improvements I’ve witnessed 1st hand (and I could share a hundred more but that would make one insanely long video!). I also include 2 calls to action! The 1st is for people living with MS or their loved ones. I ask that you write in the comments about YOUR experience with some form of improvements please. Share with me!! The 2nd call to action is for MS providers. I ask that you start not only asking patients “any new neurological symptoms? Anything gotten worse” but I also want you to start asking “has anything gotten better?” Since starting to ask this question in clinic I’m amazing at the exciting things I hear. There you have it, “the MS Improvement Project”. Please share you experiences, opinions, questions and your comments below!



Now, Please 
SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Mylan to Acquire the Global Marketing Rights to a Once-monthly Glatiramer Acetate Product through an Investment and Partnership with Israeli Company Mapi Pharma

Once approved, this product could represent a significant milestone for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
Mapi Pharma has completed an open-label Phase II clinical trial and is preparing to commence a pivotal Phase III clinical trial to support marketing applications
HERTFORDSHIRE, England and PITTSBURGH and NESS ZIONA, IsraelApril 10, 2018/PRNewswire/ -- Mylan N.V. (NASDAQ: MYL), one of the world's leading pharmaceutical companies, and Mapi Pharma Ltd., a fully integrated, clinical late stage biopharmaceutical company, today announced that the two companies will partner on the development and commercialization of GA Depot, a long-acting Glatiramer Acetate product. Mylan is acquiring global marketing rights to the product.
GA Depot is a proposed once-monthly injection for the treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, or RRMS. Multiple sclerosis (MS) organizations have estimated that 2.3 million individuals are living with MS worldwide. In the U.S., preliminary results of an MS prevalence study by the National MS Society estimate that nearly 1 million people are living with MS. Relapsing-remitting MS accounts for approximately 85% of initial MS diagnoses.




SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Lesion accumulation is predictive of long-term cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis.

 2018 Mar 6;21:110-116. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2018.03.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Ouellette R1Bergendal Å2Shams S3Martola J3Mainero C4Kristoffersen Wiberg M3Fredrikson S5Granberg T6.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the long-term progression of cognitive dysfunction and its neuroanatomical correlates and predictors in multiple sclerosis (MS).

METHODS:

A cohort of 37 MS patients reflecting five decades of disease duration and all subtypes was followed over 17.5 years. Matched controls were recruited at the last follow-up. Global cognitive functioning was assessed using a principal component cognitive index based on comprehensive neuropsychological testing. During the last 8.5 years of the study, brain MRI was performed to analyze normalized volumetrics of three global tissue compartments (white and gray matter, lesions) and strategic regions (corpus callosum, thalamus, hippocampus).

RESULTS:

Cognitive decline progressed continuously throughout the study paralleled by atrophy and lesion accumulation. The cognitive index partly correlated with Expanded Disability Status Scale (ρ = -0.47, p < 0.001) and was mainly associated with the lesion fraction (β = -0.48, p < 0.001) and callosal fraction (β = 0.39, p = 0.002) in multiple linear regression analysis. The lesion fraction was an independent predictor of the cognitive performance 8.5 years later (β = -0.35, p = 0.008). Symbol Digit Modalities Test was most frequently abnormal (40%), while Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test was more sensitive to detect cognitive decline.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cognitive impairment progresses continuously in MS, associated with atrophy and lesion accumulation, suggesting that interventions targeting these processes could be beneficial at all disease stages. Widespread cognitive functions are more profoundly affected, associated with lesions and corpus callosal atrophy, supporting the idea of an underlying disconnection mechanism for cognitive decline in MS.

KEYWORDS:

Assessment of cognitive disorders; MRI; Multiple sclerosis; Neuropsychological assessment

PMID:
 
29550717
 
DOI:
 
10.1016/j.msard.2018.03.002






:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Treatment of seizures for patients with multiple sclerosis

First published: July 8, 2009.
Link to full article: [Cochrane Library]

Plain language summary

Epileptic seizures occur in a relatively small number of patients with multiple sclerosis, but can have serious consequences. Because the cause of epileptic seizures in patients in MS may be different from that in other forms of epilepsy, it is uncertain whether patients with MS should be treated differently. We searched for studies on the treatment of epileptic seizures in patients with MS, but found none. Well designed studies that address this issue are needed.

Abstract

Background: Epileptic seizures occur in only a minority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), but can have serious consequences. The available literature suggests an association of seizures in MS with cortical and subcortical demyelinating lesions, which suggest that seizures in MS are probably most often symptomatic rather that idiopathic. It is currently unknown whether patients with MS should be treated differently from other patients with epileptic seizures.
Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of antiepileptic treatments in patients with MS.
Search methods: We searched for double‐blind, single‐blind or unblinded randomised controlled trials on antiepileptic treatment in patients with MS through electronic searches of The Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis Group's and Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Trials Registers, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE (From 1966 ‐ Jan 2008) and EMBASE (From 1974 ‐ Jan 2008).
Selection criteria: Double‐blind, single‐blind or unblinded randomised controlled trials on antiepileptic treatment in patients with MS.
Data collection and analysis: Searches yielded a total of 379 citations (CENTRAL: 20, MEDLINE: 264, EMBASE: 95). We perused titles and abstracts for relevance and independently excluded all 379 citations as clearly not meeting the inclusion criteria.
Main results: We found no studies meeting our inclusion criteria.
Authors' conclusions: Well‐designed randomised controlled trials are needed to guide clinical practice. Such trials should preferably contain a head‐to‐head comparison of antiepileptic drugs in patients with MS.
Editorial Group: Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the CNS Group.
Publication status: New.
Citation: Koch MW, Polman SKL, Uyttenboogaart M, De Keyser J. Treatment of seizures in multiple sclerosisCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews2009, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD007150. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007150.pub2. Link to Cochrane Library. [PubMed]
Logo of John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Copyright © 2010 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PMID: 19588420



SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

The Effectiveness and Risks of Cranial Electrical Stimulation for the Treatment of Pain, Depression, Anxiety, PTSD, and Insomnia: A Systematic Review [Internet].

Source

Washington (DC): Department of Veterans Affairs (US); 2018 Feb.
VA Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports.

Excerpt

Cranial electrical stimulation (CES) is a non-invasive method of applying low-intensity electrical current to the head. It is related to but distinct from other forms of transcranial electrical stimulation including electroconvulsive therapy, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation. The different versions of transcranial electrical stimulation vary in the placement of electrodes, the intensity of the current, and the waveform of the current. According to Guleyupoglu and colleagues, CES evolved from the concept of “electrosleep,” first investigated at the beginning of the 20th century. Most of the early research and applications occurred in Russia. Beginning in the 1960s, the concept of electrosleep became more popular in the USA. Because of the belief that the treatment did not actually induce sleep, but rather the sleep was a side effect of the relaxing effect of the current stimulation, the name was changed from “electrosleep” to “cranial electrical stimulation.” Other proposed names, which have not persisted, included “transcerebral electrotherapy” and “NeuroElectric Therapy.” The latter is noteworthy because it gave its name to an early CES device, the Neurotone 101, which was the first device approved by the FDA. All subsequent CES devices have been cleared for marketing by FDA based on the concept of claiming equivalency to the Neurotone 101. The status of cranial electrical stimulation devices and FDA regulation remains a matter of some controversy.


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
MS Views and News is MAKING an IMPACT for those, affected by Multiple Sclerosis
MS Views and News provides Multiple Sclerosis education, information, 
resources and services that will benefit many affected by MS. 


SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                       www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

6 Talking Points to Bring Up at Your Next Appointment for MS



When you have MS, it’s important to be able to communicate well with the medical professionals who are taking care of you. The questions that you have are important, and their answers can help you manage your condition.

It’s normal for everyone to forget their questions at their doctor’s appointment. Since a change in cognition can be one of the first signs of MS, you may be even more likely to forget the things you wanted to ask about. Keep a journal to write down your questions as you think of them. Try a notebook or a cellphone app.


You might have questions from your own personal experience or from something you’ve read. Log each one as it occurs to you, make a list, and leave room to write down the answers you receive.

Here are six talking points to get you started at your next appointment.
1. Anticipate what your doctor will ask you


When your doctor asks for information, the more accurate your answer, the better. Make note of what you’re asked at each appointment to see if it’s anything you should be tracking for next time. An example is your symptom severity. Your doctor will want to know if your symptoms are getting better, getting worse, or staying the same.






When you have MS, it’s important to be able to communicate well with the medical professionals who are taking care of you. The questions that you have are important, and their answers can help you manage your condition.

It’s normal for everyone to forget their questions at their doctor’s appointment. Since a change in cognition can be one of the first signs of MS, you may be even more likely to forget the things you wanted to ask about. Keep a journal to write down your questions as you think of them. Try a notebook or a cellphone app.


You might have questions from your own personal experience or from something you’ve read. Log each one as it occurs to you, make a list, and leave room to write down the answers you receive.

Here are six talking points to get you started at your next appointment.

1. Anticipate what your doctor will ask you

When your doctor asks for information, the more accurate your answer, the better. Make note of what you’re asked at each appointment to see if it’s anything you should be tracking for next time. An example is your symptom severity. Your doctor will want to know if your symptoms are getting better, getting worse, or staying the same.

2. Ask about new symptoms

  • If you have experienced something new and think it might be a symptom of MS, make note of it and write down as much detail as you can, such as:
  • when it first appeared
  • how often it happens
  • how severe it is
  • if it seems to be connected to something else

For example, new difficulties with walking might happen only occasionally and on days after you haven’t slept well. A detailed description of a gait problem can help your doctor decide on the best strategy or assistive walking device, if needed, for your situation.

3. Discuss medications and supplements


Keep track of medications you’re taking and any side effects that you may be experiencing. The same is true for any vitamins or herbal supplements you’re taking, or any significant changes to your diet.
If your doctor suggests that you try supplements such as fish oil or vitamins such as D and A, keep a record of the frequency and dose to see if any improvements coincide with the supplements. Ask your doctor first before trying anything new, because some supplements and herbal remedies can make symptoms worse or interfere with your medication.

Continue






SUBSCRIBE to our MS Learning Channel on YouTube: 
                   www.youtube.com/msviewsandnews
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::