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Disclaimer: 'MS Views and News' DOES NOT endorse any products or services found on this blog. It is up to you to seek advice from your healthcare provider. The intent of this blog is to provide information on various medical conditions, medications, treatments, for your personal knowledge and to keep you informed of current health-related issues. It is not a substitute for the advice of your physician. Should you or your family members have any specific medical problem, seek medical care promptly.

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Saturday, December 8, 2018

VIDEO: Multiple Sclerosis Bladder Issues: Three Most Common Problems

Aaron Boster MD - Published on Dec 5, 2018






In this video explain the three most common MS bladder problems, correlating them to bladder anatomy. If you want to better understand WHY people have urgency & frequency, hesitancy or BOTH, then start watching this MS educational video right now!



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Project - National Neurological Conditions Surveillance System (NNCSS)



Millions of people of all ages across the United States face the substantial and sometimes devastating consequences of neurological disorders and conditions.

In 2016, as part of the 21st Century Cures Act, Congress authorized Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to initiate development of a National Neurological Conditions Surveillance System (NNCSS). Congress has appropriated $5 million for the NNCSS as part of the FY 2019 spending bill for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

How will the NNCSS work?
The $5 million appropriated in FY 2019 will enable CDC to begin its NNCSS developmental and implementation work. This will include:
  1. Exploring data needs and identifying available data sources
  2. Determining how to build an effective system that will identify gaps in desired data and explore approaches
  3. Collaborating and communicating with partners, stakeholders, and Congress about the status and available details of the NNCSS.

With this investment, consistent with the 21st Century Cures Act, the NNCSS will collect and synthesize data to help increase understanding of neurological disorders and to support further neurologic research.

There will be three stages of the NNCSS, which CDC will carry out in association with partners and stakeholders:
  1. Demonstrations using two neurological conditions, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, to determine how we can have the biggest impact by exploring innovative methods and complex data sources, and capturing lessons learned, to determine which approaches will help efficiently extend the NNCSS to other neurological conditions
Continue reading


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Friday, December 7, 2018

Hospital Charges $123,000 for Two MS Treatments

By Jay Hancock, Kaiser Health News

Nov. 28, 2018 -- Shereese Hickson’s multiple sclerosis was flaring again. Spasms in her legs and other symptoms were getting worse.
She could still walk and take care of her son six years after doctors diagnosed the disease, which attacks the central nervous system. Earlier symptoms such as slurred speech and vision problems had resolved with treatment, but others lingered: she was tired and sometimes still fell.
This summer, a doctor switched her to Ocrevus, a drug approved in 2017 that delayed progression of the disease in clinical trials better than an older medicine did.
Genentech, a South San Francisco-based subsidiary of Swiss pharma giant Roche, makes Ocrevus. It is one of several drugs for multiple sclerosis delivered intravenously in a hospital or clinic. Such medicines have become increasingly expensive as a group, priced in many cases at well over $80,000 a year. Hospitals delivering the drugs often take a cut by upcharging the drug or adding hefty fees for the infusion clinic.
Hickson received her first two Ocrevus infusions as an outpatient two weeks apart in July and August. And then the bill came.
Patient: Shereese Hickson, 39, single mother who worked as a health aide and trained as a medical coder, living in Girard, Ohio. Because her MS has left her too disabled to work, she is now on Medicare; she also has Medicaid for backup.
Total Bill: $123,019 for two Ocrevus infusions taken as an outpatient. CareSource, Hickson’s Medicare managed-care plan, paid a discounted $28,960. Hickson got a bill for about $3,620, the balance calculated as her share by the hospital after the insurance reimbursement.

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Tysabri Seen as Superior to IFN-β in Preventing Relapses, Easing Disability in Small Study

DECEMBER 7, 2018 BY ALBERTO MOLANO

Tysabri Seen as Superior to IFN-β in Preventing Relapses, Easing Disability in Small Study


Tysabri (natalizumab) was found to be superior to interferon beta (IFN-β) in a small, 12-month study with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients, significantly decreasing their disability levels, its researchers report.
A vast majority — 90 percent — of Tysabri-treated patients experienced no relapses during the study period, while none of those taking IFN-β were relapse-free.
Tysabri is a humanized monoclonal antibody the binds to the α4β1-integrin molecule, preventing harmful immune T-cells from crossing the blood-brain barrier (which protects the brain) and damaging nerve cells. IFN-β is an immunomodulator that reduces the inflammation in the central nervous system that also damages nerve cells in MS patients. Both have been approved to treat relapsing forms of MS.
Researchers compared the clinical effectiveness of Tysabri (marketed by Biogen; monthly intravenous infusion of 300 mg) with that of IFN-β (intramuscular injections of 20 μg, three times a week) in RRMS patients being treated at a hospital in Hamadan.
CinnoVex (marketed by CinnaGen, based in Tehran) was the IFN-β-1a therapy used in this study. In the United States, IFN-β-1a is marketed as AvonexPlegridy, and Rebif.


Relapsing MS Therapy, Lemtrada, Carries Rare But Serious Risk of Stroke and Artery Tears, FDA Warns

December 2, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a safety alert, warning about a rare but life-threatening risk of stroke and artery rupture in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) being treated with Lemtrada(alemtuzumab). 
Since Lemtrada’s approval in 2014 to treat relapsing MS, 13 cases worldwide have been reported to the FDA of ischemic stroke (caused by clots) and hemorrhagic stroke (caused by bleeds) or of tears in head and neck arteries. All these cases are associated with the medicine’s use.
These symptoms were experienced shortly after patients received an intravenous infusion of the therapy — within one day of its administration in 12 people, and within three days in the remaining patient.
The FDA announced it has added a new warning about these serious risks — which could lead to permanent disability or death — to the prescribing information on the drug label and the patient Medication Guide. This information comes highlighted in a “boxed warning,” FDA’s highest warning level.
Alemtuzumab, the active ingredient of Lemtrada (marked by Sanofi Genzyme), is also approved under the brand name Campath to treat a blood cancer called B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). This medicine’s label is also being updated to include these risks.
Patients and their caregivers are strongly advised to seek emergency treatment if the patient experiences signs or symptoms of a stroke or tears in head and neck arteries.

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Bladder Training for those with need to frequently urinate

How to Train Your Bladder



If you experience a frequent urgency to urinate—perhaps due to having an enlarged prostate if you’re a man, having given birth if you’re a woman, or having an “overactive bladder”—there may be a practical DIY solution to the problem, referred to as bladder training. It may be worth a try before resorting to medication or surgical procedures.
Though evidence of effectiveness from studies is limited, bladder training is commonly done in clinical practice, with patients often reporting success.

Bladder basics

The average bladder can hold about a pint of urine. It’s common to urinate anywhere from five to eight times over a 24-hour period—though the frequency depends on how much food and fluid you consume, as well as your age and metabolism. Psychological factors also influence voiding: While some people bite their nails or eat when stressed, others urinate a lot.
As urine is produced by the kidneys, it gradually fills the bladder, causing it to expand like a balloon and the “detrusor” muscle within the bladder wall to stretch. Meanwhile, the muscles in and around the urethra (the tube through which urine passes out of the body) help dam up the bladder until there is an appropriate time and place to urinate. Pelvic floor muscles situated beneath the bladder also help keep a lid on the urethra.
But as the bladder begins to reach its capacity, signals are sent to the brain that increase the urge to urinate. Urination—which is normally under voluntary control—occurs when the detrusor muscle contracts and the urethral muscles relax.
An “overactive bladder”—a broad term used to describe a range of symptoms, including urinary urgency and sometimes leakage—occurs when the bladder contracts abnormally for various reasons, triggering a sudden and uncontrollable urge to urinate. Weak pelvic floor muscles can contribute to the problem. Many people who have leakage or accidents go to the bathroom when they don’t need to—“just in case”—but this strategy can backfire. If you often go when your bladder is not full, the bladder wall doesn’t get stretched as much, which conditions it to send out the need-to-urinate signal at a reduced volume of urine.

Go, bladder training!



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